So these Kansas tax cuts

Apparently everyone’s running around saying that the tax cuts haven’t worked because they created a deficit and there’s not been all that lovely economic growth that was promised.

OK.

So, where’s all that lovely economic growth that having a deficit is supposed to produce?

16 thoughts on “So these Kansas tax cuts”

  1. So Much for Subtlety

    It is the wrong sort of deficit? Leaving middle class people with the money they earned is not the right way to run a deficit. You have to throw money at lesbian bereavement officers, other social workers, children with dyslexia and the like. That is the right, economic-growth-causing way to run a deficit.

  2. @sms
    Clarification required. Are those officers to help bereaved lesbians or lesbians who are bereavement officers?

  3. So Much for Subtlety

    Steve Crook – “Clarification required. Are those officers to help bereaved lesbians or lesbians who are bereavement officers?”

    You know I have never asked. From an economic perspective it probably doesn’t matter.

    But from a more psychological or political perspective I think we can all agree that a heterosexual bereavement officer is not sufficiently empathetic or aware of what your average bereaved lesbian is feeling to do the job properly. You have to escape the heteronormative oppressive patriarchal system in its entirety before you can truly understand and sympathise. So I would say that for those reasons, they ought to know their way around the power tool section of their local hardware store.

  4. “You have to escape the heteronormative oppressive patriarchal system in its entirety”
    I remember I had a Christmas cracker joke where that was the punchline. Trouble is, I don’t remember the question that preceded it…

  5. “Trouble is, I don’t remember the question that preceded it…”

    Doesn’t really matter.

    It’s the universal answer to any and all questions.

  6. So Much for Subtlety

    Steve Crook – “I remember I had a Christmas cracker joke where that was the punchline. Trouble is, I don’t remember the question that preceded it…”

    Some people have the best Christmas office parties. I expect for the people who care about these things, it is the answer to all questions.

  7. So is the LHTD saying that a high tax – high public expenditure state in surplus is bad and a low tax- low public expenditure state in deficit is very good? This economics thing can be hard sometimes can’t it.

  8. no no no, your mind is fuddled with neoliberal consensus. Deficits only work if you RAISE taxes and then give money BACK to people – it’s COMPLETELY different to not taking the money off them in the first place. Honestly, you’d have to be some kind of sophist to compare the two.

  9. SMFS: “So I would say that for those reasons, they ought to know their way around the power tool section of their local hardware store.”

    This is wrong on so many levels.

    “Power” is inherently hierarchical and hegemonic.

    “Tools” is inherently patriarchal and phallocentric.

    “Hardware”… well,“Hard-“ is phallocentric, and
    “-ware” has connotations of commerce, hence of rampant consumerism and the destruction of our planet.

    SMFS: report to Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU for re-education.

    And I demand that the eradication of the terms “power tool” and “hardware” should, until further notice, be regarded as the most important issue in British and American politics.

  10. Lud beat me to it: spending more than you take in is the only way to have a deficit.

    From what I can find on it, it appears that the expected economic benefits take time to accrue, whereas the spending continued unabated. The gap should have been anticipated.

  11. I would advise the Left that a cold evaluation of the evidence to judge whether a policy has worked or not is a very dodgy road for them to make their first step on.

  12. From the above:

    • In March 2013, unemployment in Kansas stood at 5.5%. It has since dropped to 4.2%, tied for 14th lowest in the country.

    • From 1998-2012, Kansas ranked 38th in private-sector job growth, according Bureau of Labor Statistics data crunched by the Kansas Policy Institute. In 2013—the first year after the tax reform—the state climbed to 27th place, and in 2014 it moved to 21st, placing it in the top half of states.

    • In the second half of 2014, hourly wages in Kansas grew 3.5%, according to BLS data, far faster than the national average of 1.9%.

    Then there is the Kansas City metropolitan area, a living laboratory that straddles the border with Missouri. On Mr. Brownback’s side of the divide, the top personal income-tax rate is now 4.9%, beginning at $15,000 for single filers; in Missouri the top 6% rate starts at $9,000.

    “I just think Kansas City is a great study,” the governor says. “This is an unusual place, where you’ve got a city virtually equally divided between two states.” The results? Over the past two calendar years, private-sector jobs increased by 5.6% on the Kansas side and only 2.2% on the Missouri. In the same period hourly wages grew $1.22 on the Kansas side, compared with $0.61 on the Missouri side.’

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