The beauty of windfarms – in pictures

Weird to have this run in The Guardian.

Absolutely any other manifestation of human activity in the countryside is taken as an abomination.

Here is a roundup of images from around the world celebrating the windfarms that help to power our way of life.

Powering our way of life is also an attribute of fracking rigs, oil wells, coal mines and nuclear power stations. Yet we’re not going to have a series of images in The G celebrating their beauty, are we?

Why, it’s almost as if there’s a political standard being applied to what is beautiful, isn’t it?

36 thoughts on “The beauty of windfarms – in pictures”

  1. This is all part of the Guardian set priming the pump.

    Not only do renewables save the world they are aesthetically avant-garde, beautiful etc etc…

    The left are soooooo much better at marketing and soooocial engineering.

    It is why, depstie data and evidence they have managed to lead us to where we are.

    If the high-speed train and the tidal barrier go through I put Cameron on the crony capitalist left

  2. I find there’s a majesty in the sweep of electricity pylons over dull, basic bitch English farmland. We need our own version of the Wichita Lineman to highlight their real romance and poetry.

  3. You want cutting charges rather than simple shaped charges

    This is the sort of useful advice that keeps me coming back here.

  4. I’m a big fan of the headstocks at Clipstone Colliery. I think they’re still there.. but possibly not for long. They should be listed and preserved. But fuck monuments to working class history, right?

  5. @TimN
    I have a very long term drinking buddy been sending me rig pictures since forever. Many of them with said asshole balanced on their highest point. F***g amazing things!

    Peripherally, you heard about the supermarket trolly thing? I’m told they got one standing on the bottom next the deepest ever (at the time) drilling off Brazil, somewhere. Smuggled it in in pieces in luggage, then welded it back together.

  6. Widdershins,

    http://www.pylons.org/

    You’re welcome.

    Tim,

    I’m not convinced you need to be left-wing to find wind turbines more beautiful than oil refineries. I think they’re very beautiful. And so do my daughters, who are too young to be reading any politics into it.

    Tim N’s right about offshore platforms, though. There’s one in the docks at Belfast at the mo. Magnificent. Especially when it’s lit up at night.

  7. Tim N. those new fangled rigs don’t look half as good as the old North Sea ones that had a nice big gas flare out of the top and gallons of BS&W pouring out of the side.

    Real rigs, they were. Nowadays they use the gas and water for injection. Far to PC for me.

  8. TTG,

    > They should be listed and preserved. But fuck monuments to working class history, right?

    Just try taking down Samson and Goliath in Belfast. Never going to happen.

  9. Tim N. those new fangled rigs don’t look half as good as the old North Sea ones that had a nice big gas flare out of the top and gallons of BS&W pouring out of the side.

    Indeed, they did look good but look incredibly dated (and dilapidated) now. Nowadays you only see the flare during commissioning and well cleanup. 🙁

  10. Stirling Castle looks so good, now. Maybe they could make Mont Saint Michel look decent by putting up some windmills behind it.

  11. Peripherally, you heard about the supermarket trolly thing? I’m told they got one standing on the bottom next the deepest ever (at the time) drilling off Brazil, somewhere. Smuggled it in in pieces in luggage, then welded it back together.

    Ah, that cheered me up, hope it’s true.

  12. I think I have seen paens to gas storage towers in the groan. rightly so.

    it is hardly a surprise that perceptions about function and virtue affect perceptions of beauty

  13. Ah, that cheered me up, hope it’s true.

    Dunno. There’s a few urban myths floating about, the ones from the early days in the North Sea and abroad from the mid-90s and before might have some truth to them, but these kind of japes have probably disappeared these days. For a start, it’s harder to pull off now – baggage inspections, closer supervision, better reporting, etc. – and also somebody will always go fucking apeshit. Nowadays we have governments and NGOs on our backs looking for any excuse to get rich from a lawsuit, you’d need to be so careful and anyone with any kind of initiative is rapidly being weeded out of the oil industry. Even putting a mildly humorous slide in a presentation is frowned upon with my lot.

  14. “They should be listed and preserved. But fuck monuments to working class history, right?”

    Well, the working class were traitors to their vanguard, right?

  15. I have always had a soft spot for old style windmills, although I have never worked out why they always put the sales directly in front of the front door.

  16. > I have never worked out why they always put the sales directly in front of the front door.

    Was it not that the top bit of the building could rotate to catch the wind, so the sails were only sometimes in front of the door?

  17. This from the comments

    “elmerofoz 2 May 2014

    Utterly offensive? is he kidding? no Joe, what is utterly offensive is the Catholic church’s cover-up of child rape and bashing, then make two saints.
    Wind farms are unobtrusive power producers, nothing more.

    I have been banned twice from there for trolling. What have I done that he hasn’t? (apart from taking the piss out of spelling and grammar perhaps).

  18. Well in the case of fracking rigs it would be quite hard to spot them in a panoramic photo, so what would be the point?

  19. Thanks, Squander. Makes me wonder – Are there no depths to which British eccentricity can sink?

    By the way, how come you knew about this? A member perchance?

  20. I have to admit I quite like windmills (of any variety), and I was quite keen on that newly proposed design for pylons.

    That said, a power station could/can be aesthetic, if someone puts their mind to it.

  21. I was disappointed with the new pylon design, because of how much better some of the competition entries were. They picked a practical but very dull design. Some of the others were impractical or even silly, but a couple were very practical yet stunningly beautiful.

    Although the new Icelandic design, if they do go ahead and build them — now, that’s going to be a sight to see.

    Not convincing anyone here I’m not a member, am I?

  22. Some Spanish have invented a new wind ‘turbine’, the Vortex, which looks like a thick pole – no spinning things, it generates electricity by wobbling.

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