Yep, and wouldn’t it be great

But much more is at stake than euros. The world will consider a “Grexit” as a devastating blow for EU monetary cooperation and the European project.

Reality intruding on an idiot project. Such a shame, eh?

8 thoughts on “Yep, and wouldn’t it be great”

  1. “Greece’s people must be at the centre of such a settlement. They did not cause this crisis and remain the victims of successive Greek governments, who have protected vested interests and the Greek clientelist system at their expense.”

    I loved this bit. We all remember the “Greek people” voting for sensible low-spend parties, only to have successive governments cruelly deny them and protect those “vested interests” instead.

  2. I did laugh at the use of “EU monetary cooperation”: “cooperation” is what tickled my funny bone. Vee haf vays of maykink you laugh.

  3. Sub Specie AEternitatis

    “We must remember that Germany has lent approximately €80bn. This is an astonishing figure, close to a quarter of Greece’s budget for 2016.”

    Really? Greece has an annual *budget* of over 320 billion euro? That is more than their GDP! No wonder they are in trouble.

  4. Socrates and Plato dealt with this shit 2500 years ago.

    “The problem with democracy . . . .”

  5. @Rob

    ‘I loved this bit. We all remember the “Greek people” voting for sensible low-spend parties, only to have successive governments cruelly deny them and protect those “vested interests” instead.’

    This is the point at which Ironman calls you a racist and then blames it all on the Jews.

  6. Ancient philosophy: Democracy will survive until the people realize they can vote themselves money.

    Post modern philosophy: Having voted themselves the money, they are victims.

  7. “The Greek People” like most everyone else has been led down a rabbit hole of supporting the State/banking finance system predicated on national debt.

    The problem is that the only way this can be metastable is if the currency maps onto the nation, as with the pound sterling and UK, or dollar and USA. Otherwise you’re mortgaging your country to creditors and can’t get out of it by manipulating monetary policy, and Greece is providing a glorious demonstration of this right now.

    Which is why it would be fun to let Salmond and Sturgeon have their iScotland with the pound sterling, and then call in the debts, and watch their sad little faces when they realise they can’t QE their way out of it.

    The Greek people have voted much the same way as the English people or American people. What they’ve discovered is that you can’t do that if you don’t own the bank.

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