Surprise! Actress is financially illiterate!

I’ve never been in debt, but I certainly had financial trouble when I bought my second house. I’d just had a baby and it was when there was a Thatcherite government. I bought it on a mortgage….

Apparently a mortgage isn’t debt these days.

16 thoughts on “Surprise! Actress is financially illiterate!”

  1. Note the reference to SECOND house; presumably the first one had been bought outright.

    How the other half live ….

  2. I think she means second house in chronological terms.

    What Fathcher has to do with it is not too clear. Yes interest rates were going up back then. Which was as good for savers as it was bad for borrowers.

    No thought of course that Thatch was trying to undo the mess created by those who went before–on all sorts of levels. She didn’t succeed but at least she tried. Why people are even interested in the opinions of dim-witted slebs about anything escapes me.

  3. Strictly speaking, the mortgage is the security granted to the bank over the house rather than the loan itself. I know you enjoy pendantry here.

  4. Let’s be fair to her, she does straight up-front admit that’s she’s crap with money. Because of her background and because since being a reasonably successful actress, a lot of the money stuff has been handled by the agent(s).

    Why? Well, although Tim has (understandably – it’s what he blogs about) picked on the money side, it is a more general interview – they aren’t asking her opinion on Corbynomics (or Murphobollocks or whatever it is called this morning.) And this is female-reader bait. They tend to like this stuff.

    It’s the corollary to why perfectly serious newspapers have in-depth articles about football on the back pages. Blokes tend to like that stuff.

  5. @Fatty
    Talking of ‘pendantry’, there seems to be a standard developing on this blog to misspell the words ‘pedantry’ and ‘pedantic’.

  6. @Bart

    It’s a Polly-on-Cif related in-joke. Though I’m sure it mystifies outsiders. (It’s been common on here for years, possibly since the moment of Polly’s original comment?)

  7. I think you are still solvent if you have a house and a mortgage. So long as there is no negative equity you are not technically in debt.
    Unsecured loans = debt in common parlance.
    I wonder if she uses a credit card though?

  8. Mr Ecks

    ”What Fathcher has to do with it is not too clear.”

    It’s classic dog-whistle, ”I’m not a (hawk, spit) Tory”, virtue signalling. Classic lovey, bit ashamed of having money, right on-ness.

  9. So Much For Subtlety

    Surreptitious Evil – “It’s the corollary to why perfectly serious newspapers have in-depth articles about football on the back pages. Blokes tend to like that stuff.”

    I don ‘t recall the Telegraph having in-depth interviews with footballers. Rather it is a sign of the Telegraph’s rejection of their traditional core audience in favour of young, urban, rather silly women.

    Presumably it takes a strong editorial hand to force journalists to write what their readers are interested in, rather than what they themselves are interested in. And the Telegraph lacks that strong hand.

  10. JimW:

    Technically, yes you are, you are just solvent on a balance sheet test. You can test the proposition by not paying an instalment on your mortgage (obviously by “mortgage” I really mean “secured loan”) and seeing if the bank is allowed by the courts to bring an action for recovery of the debt.

  11. SMFS>

    “I don ‘t recall the Telegraph having in-depth interviews with footballers. Rather it is a sign of the Telegraph’s rejection of their traditional core audience”

    No, it’s a sign that your memory is going. The Telegraph often has long interviews with footballers.

  12. bloke (not) in spain

    @Fatty @ JimW

    It’s where the risk goes. With a house loan/mortgage, there’s no guarantee the security is realisable to cover the loan. So, like all debt, it’s the lender carries the risk.

  13. SMFS , the Telegraph personal finance pages are stuffed full of interviews with celebrities of all kinds, including rugby players, cricketers, actors, musicians of all genders. I don’t read them myself but they are always prominently advertised and trailed on the portal.

  14. So Much For Subtlety

    Diogenes – “the Telegraph personal finance pages are stuffed full of interviews with celebrities of all kinds, including rugby players, cricketers, actors, musicians of all genders. I don’t read them myself but they are always prominently advertised and trailed on the portal.”

    A celebrity interview is not likely to be in-depth. But sure. I can believe that. As I said, they have rejected their traditional audience of older White males who make a reasonable amount of money and got a good education. So they feel a need to do a celebrity interview instead. Not to mention their women’s section:

    Becoming a mother makes me fight harder for British milk

    Dairy farmers struggling with low milk prices have been forced to protest with ‘Milk Bucket Challenges’ and campaigns. Farmer Philippa Hall shares her fears
    13 Comments
    Airports officers are fighting to save British girls from FGM
    No school, no rules: would you sign up to the latest parenting trend?

    Their men’s section is, if anything, worse:

    Can men be feminists too, please?
    Men are constantly shot down for trying to support women’s voices. Chris Moss asks if there’s any room in feminism’s Fourth Wave for men

    Their life style sections are vile. It is starting to seep into their news and commentary sections as well.

    It is the Guardian-lite.

    My theory is that they hired a bunch of young urban girls who worked cheaply. But who refuse to write anything other than whatever takes their fancy. So the Telegraph is slowly becoming the musings of some vapid metropolitan Journalism Studies girl aged about 26 and a half.

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