Jezzbollah will succeed through brainwashing!

The model for a leftwing resurgence? Evangelical Christianity
George Monbiot

Corbyn’s survival requires a sustained grassroots movement. I share none of its core beliefs, but evangelism shows me how this might best be done

So, don’t let inconvenient information reach the faithful, insist upon blind obedience to the dictates of the beard in the sky and above all, don’t let anyone question anything.

Should work, worked for millennia already, hasn’t it?

12 thoughts on “Jezzbollah will succeed through brainwashing!”

  1. Well they will have to continue the assault on education then as these Evangelical Christian groups seem to thrive only in places populated mostly by thickos.

  2. And do remember that (iirc and I haven’t bothered consulting Bishop Google) that tithes weren’t calculated on what you actually earned but on what the Church thought you should have earned.

    Which, apart from the ridiculously low level of the take, is a pretty good description of LHTD tax due calculations.

  3. Not a good model at all. Certainly not after the Reformation. No one group in charge–how many types of Baptist and God knows what else are there? That hardly fits with the kind of all-controlling tyranny Jezza’s gang would like.

    Also the retreat of Death into the background has weakened faith. In days gone by it was in your face 24-7. Now, it is there but to a degree such that many can pretend it isn’t going to happen to them.

    The analogy holds true for socialism and poverty. Yeah–as many on here have pointed out—altho’ the “poor” are still with us they are fat and watching TV and deciding which tattoo parlour to patronise. Not good candidates for getting all fired up about the hate-filled shite peddled by socialism.

  4. So Much For Subtlety

    Dongguan John – “Well they will have to continue the assault on education then as these Evangelical Christian groups seem to thrive only in places populated mostly by thickos.”

    In America the Upper Middle class are more likely to be Church-going believers than the working class.

    I am willing to bet the same is true in the UK.

  5. The analogy fails because religion is a market, and democracy isn’t. I know someone that has a church with about a dozen people going to it. They’re quite orthodox as in, they’re pro-Easter but don’t do anything for Christmas (because it’s pagan) and it runs just fine. Government isn’t like that. You need 35%+ of the population that likes you.

    And the problem with the Guardianistas is that people don’t. And their fucking ignorance and arrogance is their undoing. If someone is anywhere on the right, they’re either a top hat wearing toff who is self-interested in crushing the poor, or one of the poor darling poor that are being crushed and don’t even know it.

  6. SMFS,

    “In America the Upper Middle class are more likely to be Church-going believers than the working class.

    I am willing to bet the same is true in the UK.”

    Is that true in the US?

    The big thing about churchgoing in the UK is that there’s quite a strong rural vs town thing, and that’s about the social dimension of going to church.

  7. Has anyone *really* not heard of the Salvation Army?
    @ SE
    I don’t where that idiotic idea from but it certainly wasn’t from a Christian

  8. @ The Stigler
    You’re a bit out-of-date. That was true in the nineteenth century.
    @ SMFS
    There is a tendency for the upper-middle-class in social, not monetary, terms to be more church-going – doctors, teachers, nurses, classical musicians, actuaries are more common that estate agents, publicans, pop musicians, accountants – but to what extent is that a consequence of the careers chosen by Christians?

  9. “doctors, teachers, nurses, classical musicians, actuaries …”: that’s an interesting list. Three professions reminded of death daily, one that plays music written by the dead, and one that probably routinely wishes death on many of its young charges.

  10. @ dearieme
    🙂
    I’d never looked at it like that – I had noticed the moral standards differential – partly because I don’t think about death daily: I know more investment actuaries than mortality underwriters. You may have a point.

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