So labour isn’t a precious resource these days, eh?

It only makes sense for the State of California to effectively eliminate the disposal of organic material by 2025 by turning it into more useful products. Moreover, processing recycleables can create 20 times as many jobs as sending material to landfills.

After more than a thousand years of burying our trash in landfills, it is time to update the use and disposal of precious resources for the 21st century.

Sigh.

25 thoughts on “So labour isn’t a precious resource these days, eh?”

  1. ‘it is time to update the use and disposal of precious resources for the 21st century.’

    Paper is not a precious resource.

    Plastic is not a precious resource.

    Aluminum is not a precious resource.

    Duh mayor is stoopid.

  2. According to one of the writers quoted in the article, recycling brings positive beyond the reuse of materials, such as inspiring people to look after the environment in other ways and giving people a nice sense of well being.

    I must be an atypical weirdo as I find separating my rubbish fucking tedious, washing the rubbish to remove food waste annoying, especially since I have finally purchased a dish washer and I have no desire to do washing up by hand any more. Further, the level of brow beating that the local council twats did to introduce the recycling initiave in my home town has produced a potent sense of environmental fatigue in me that has left me less likely to do other environmental measures.

  3. So Much For Subtlety

    Salamander – “Further, the level of brow beating that the local council twats did to introduce the recycling initiave in my home town has produced a potent sense of environmental fatigue in me that has left me less likely to do other environmental measures.”

    Time for an anti-recycling party? How can these people keep getting re-elected?

    I have just heard Cameron say he is going to devote the rest of his time to making sure so Black, Gay or disabled person will ever cry about anything ever again. How can our politics be so disconnected from reality and what the voters want?

  4. “Aluminum is not a precious resource.”

    You’d have to define “precious”. Alu is easily recycled and has commercial value as it just becomes new alu.

    The rest? Take the tin out with a magnet and bury the rest. Siphon off the methane. Wait for someone to figure out how to make new plastic from old.

  5. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I live in one of the most eco-conscious and biodiverse nations on the planet. Twice (!) a week I leave a plastic bag of unsorted rubbish outside my front door and a pantechnicon festooned with cheerful but odoriferous men comes past and takes it away, to where I neither know nor care.

  6. dearieme said:
    ““Aluminum is not a precious resource.” Yes it is; it’s concentrate of electricity.”

    But these days isn’t it mostly just a way for Iceland to export the energy from their volcanic hot springs?

  7. Ferrous metals and aluminum can be pulled out with magnetic fields, cheaper than crushing and melting tons of rock. Anything else that is chemically reducable should be recycled into energy.

  8. Bloke in North Dorset

    @Salamaner

    “I must be an atypical weirdo as I find separating my rubbish fucking tedious, washing the rubbish to remove food waste annoying,”

    In one of his books* from a few years ago Tim points out that all these little bits of energy being used do add up. It being Tim he didn’t provide any numbers (IIRC) but a quick Google and according to the beeb the average UK energy bill is around £1,250 or about £3.50 per day. If only 1p of this is caused by recycling that works out at around £100m per year.

    I’ll bet you’ll not see that in the costs of recycling calculations.

    *This reminds me I lent it to my son when he was in his teenage trot phase and haven’t got it back. Fortunately he recovered and is now quite firmly of the classic liberal mold.

  9. jgh
    October 11, 2015 at 8:12 pm

    Ferrous metals and aluminum can be pulled out with magnetic fields, cheaper than crushing and melting tons of rock. Anything else that is chemically reducable should be recycled into energy.

    ===================

    Why?

    BTW . . . magnets don’t work on aluminum on this side of the Atlantic.

  10. Bloke in North Dorset

    Funny how those who are so keen on recycling are very quick to claim ‘externalities’ on fossil fuels, but not in any way interested on them when it comes to the costs of washing and sorting the garbage. The push to ban/charge for plastic bags being a good example, they are only interested in the symbolic win, not the unseen impact.

  11. How can our politics be so disconnected from reality and what the voters want?

    Lack of competition. Who else are you going to vote for who doesn’t push the same old lefty claptrap?

    Cameron know his supporters won’t start voting Labour, so the only real threat is the UKIP. Who got tons of votes, and no seats. So he doesn’t care what Tory voters think.

    Besides, he’ll probably retire into a fat job provided by the party’s corporate donors before the next election.

  12. So Much For Subtlety

    Gamecock – “BTW . . . magnets don’t work on aluminum on this side of the Atlantic.”

    Must be coz you all don’t spell it right!

  13. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Yeah, except magnets do work on aluminium in recycling plants. Aluminium is not ferromagnetic but will experience a force when moving through a magnetic field as eddy currents are induced. This is sufficient to segregate it from insulating materials like paper and plastic.

  14. “Funny how those who are so keen on recycling are very quick to claim ‘externalities’ on fossil fuels, but not in any way interested on them when it comes to the costs of washing and sorting the garbage.”
    I wonder.
    Given pretty well everybody sluices out containers for recycling under the hot tap, there may be more energy required to heat the kilo or so of water to 90 deg than would be used in making the few grams of container. For plastics, I’d say a definite. But given relative efficiencies between home water heating & industrial processes, wouldn’t be surprised if that wasn’t true for aluminium & steel. Especially if one includes the energy needed to turn the recovered metals into industrial feedstock.

  15. I don’t bother to rinse out the recycling. If the bag starts to smell, I just take it outside and start a new one.

    I also don’t bother to check whether the plastics are “recyclable” or not: everything I’m chucking out that is plastic goes in the plastics bin. If the council wants me to segregate based on types of plastic then they can buy me a fucking mass spectrometer.

  16. I like the system in France, or at least my suburb: place all rubbish of any description in a dumpster and a truck comes by a few times per week and takes it away. It seems to work.

  17. Gamecock: magnets /do/ work on aluminium – how do you think car speedometers and magnetic levitation works? A moving magnetic field moves aluminium.

  18. Amazing isn’t, TimN?
    I can remember the conversation with a landlord, asking him the form for going down the dechetterie & getting rid of the old bed & stuff.
    “Why would you want to do that?” he said “Just put it outside & it goes.”

  19. I like the system in France…

    I was visiting my sister, who at the time lived in Folsom, California. I was used to the idea of sorting the recycling, and asked her where the blue bin, yellow bag, glass bin, etc, were. She replied “Just toss it all in the recycle bin – they sort it out later.”
    I was amazed, and asked how “they” could sort through all the different materials – she simply commented that there was a whole prison full of idle hands ‘just up the road’ where the sorting was done. I never figured out how scraps of metal or broken glass didn’t become prison-yard shivs… nobody seemed too worried about it, though.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *