The last Terry Pratchett novel

Well said:

I will shed a tear if I finish the book as I did when I heard the news but I’m mulling over the idea of buying it and keeping it, unread, on a shelf, so there’s always one more book

I’ve spent the last decade (I was late to the party) waiting for the next book. I’ve now read the last and there will be no more.

Sigh. An embuggerance, eh?

20 thoughts on “The last Terry Pratchett novel”

  1. Not yet read it myself as I’m building up to it with a complete reread of the Discworld from start to finish and I’m only currently up to the Fifth Elephant. I suspect emotion will openly displayed when I get there though.

  2. An embuggerance indeed. The only comfort is that before the end he was widely recognised as a great writer by many who might have been expected to dismiss him. A S Byatt stands out here, but there were many others.
    The Fifth Elephant eh! Who can forget the gloomy trousers of Uncle Vanya?
    I even persuaded my step-mother ( a senior psychoanalyst)to start reading him. She adored Maurice and His Amazing Educated Rodents and has now read most of the canon at the age of 75!

  3. A great man indeed, was lucky enough to see him give a couple of talks at Hay book festival over the years. Very funny, great with the audience.

  4. Late to the party. I’d not heard of him until he gave a talk at Warwick to launch the Science of Discworld, and it took me a few more years to start reading them in sequence. I read Unseen Academicals this summer so I still have a few yet.

  5. The world neatly divides between those who’ve read & enjoyed Pratchett & those who haven’t.
    Or those who are worth knowing & those who are best kept clear of.
    You can construe the above, any way you like.

  6. Thanks for this reminder! I’m going back to sea in a few days time and was pondering which books to download to my kindle to see me through the voyage. TP, top man and sadly missed!

  7. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I read The Colour of Magic while laid up in sick bay at school with the lurgi in late 1984 or so. I was an instant convert.

  8. The now tired cliche that genius is an overused word aptly applies here.

    An incredibly talented man, who for a long period launched a minimum of two novels a year which were, without exception, excellent.

    I very much doubt we will see his equal in my lifetime (although that might be more to do with the fact that with small children I never seem to have the time to discover a new author!)

  9. ” I never seem to have the time to discover a new author!”

    If you are interested in fantasy-style writing then I can recommend Richard J Murphy. His imagined world isn’t as internally consistent as Pratchett’s, but it does have as many laugh-out-loud moments.

  10. Terry had an article in a magazine many years ago. He referred to the churh of the cosmic confidence trick, a sect for people who have left other nutty sects. Its holy icon was a solid gold brick made of brass, you were not baptised but wet behind the ears and the motto was ‘there’s one born every minute’. Great writer.

  11. Was loaned a copy of, I think, The Colour of Magic back in the early nineties. I’ve been driving people mad with snorting and giggling out loud every damn time I pick up a discworld novel.

    He’d have earned an approving nod from Granny W.

  12. TP was amazing, and I have loved Discworld (and Strata etc.) all, but “The Long Earth” is dreadful.

    Slow plot, little character development, no dramatic tension, only a small dollop of TP’s wit (the church of the cosmic confidence trick get’s a mention) and pages upon pages of infodump.

    Not going to read the rest of the season, and if you haven’t picked it up yet, wait until you get it for 50p at the charity shop because if you don’t like it you won’t feel guilty about starting a fire with it.

  13. I have alarmed people sitting near me on ‘planes and trains by laughing out loud at Pratchett (“”Well, I can do next Tuesday”” is probably, for me, his funniest line).

    But except for “Making Money”, none of them have made me do that for some time (probably none since the Fifth Elephant). Some of the intervening ones were still good books (although the Monstrous Regiment was ploddingly dull), but they lacked the laugh out loud humour of the early ones.

    But still a great author – even if he’d only written his first dozen, it would still be an amazing output. But as someone (possibly our host) said of Raising Steam, the last real Pratchett was a few books earlier than the last one published.

  14. Jassop

    I agree with those criticisms, the most disappointing aspect being the lack of real motivation behind the whole story. It does flesh out a bit more throughout the series, but it’s still an exercise of abstract.

    Still, I liked the concept of the switch and I’ll prob get the last one out of the library when it’s there.

  15. I’ve so far go through about 1/4 of the last novel but had to stop as I couldn’t read anymore, it was too upsetting. I started back and the beginning with Colour of magic after his passing and its wonderful to see the evolution of his writing style from pastiche to satire to rounded storytellng when the plots and characterizations matured and his humanist nature really came to the fore.

  16. I started reading Pratchett after playing https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Colour_of_Magic_%28video_game%29 . I went back and read Strata and Dark Side of the Sun, as well as the first two Discworld books, before embarking on each new one (and Good Omens) within days of its release in paperback. I lost interest after Small Gods, mostly because I had become more familiar with the stories his works were parodying. On the upside, that does give me 27 Discworld books I haven’t read… Anyone got any tips for the best of the post Small Gods series?

  17. The Truth is a fabulous spoof of the newspaper industry. Best one since Scoop. Unseen Academicals was probably the last one that had the proper layerings of him. Those after that lose the richness as the Alzheimer’s took hold.

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