Yes, it’s economic idiocy alright

As Longrider says:

Economic Idiocy

Quite so. On the solar company closes down story:

Nearly 1,000 staff were laid off in Leicester yesterday as home insulation and solar panel provider, Mark Group, fell into administration.

Within hours Climate Energy, which describes itself as “the UK’s largest provider of energy efficiency solutions” had also closed down, announcing the news on their website.

OK, right. And Mark finds a comment underneath the original article:

Presumably British consumers will now buy Chinese imports and the British workers will go on the dole and the country loses the tax income.

Quite rightly pointing out that if it’s the subsidies that were paying those wages then we’re no worse off now, are we?

But it’s even more delicious than that. Because these were installation firms, not manufacturing firms. Installing…..Chinese panels?

12 thoughts on “Yes, it’s economic idiocy alright”

  1. I’m sorry for those thrown on the dole but glad to see the back of the firm. Parasites sucking the tit of eco-clowns who have their hands in the taxpayers wallet.

    The sooner all the solar and wind-freaks are finished the better.

  2. Quite rightly pointing out that if it’s the subsidies that were paying those wages then we’re no worse off now, are we?

    Hah! Good luck persuading Lefties on that point: they are convinced that workers paid from the public purse represent a net gain for the exchequer due to the taxes they pay.

  3. It’s always weird to me how these people will go nuclear if you suggest not letting more people into the country, or being racist towards the Chinese, or not spunking aid across the world, but how all the jobs should be given to the honkeys in England.

  4. On another forum I’m currently in an argument with a chap about electric cars. He doesn’t seem to want to admit that the current Government grant of £5,000 off the list price and no road tax isn’t sustainable in the long term.

  5. Rhyds – whats the payoff term? 5 years+? 10 years? Until the cost of car plus electricity spent matches the cost and petrol of similar sized petrol car.
    I’ve no objection to electric cars, just not a great deal for some of us.

  6. On another forum I’m currently in an argument with a chap about electric cars.

    Ask him what the best possible range is of an electric car and then ask him how long it takes to extend that range for any given journey. Then ask him if he would be prepared to queue at a petrol station for that length of time. Until that issue is solved, the government can give them away free and few people will want one.

  7. Ah the joy of feed in tariffs, or subsidises as they are more commonly known in the English language.

    I fail to see the problem. People were buying solar panels as an investment, with the government guaranteeing a return on the investment. The truth is that domestic solar panels are not an investment. They are luxury items in this country. A premium fixture and fitting in the same way an Aga stove and oven or a power shower is.

    Of course in countries with plenty of sunshine, solar systems really do make a lot of sense, especially solar thermal hot water system. Just go on holiday to Greece or Turkey. Practically every roof has one.

    Here is a thought. If all these stuck up environmental guardian reading luvvies love solar so much, why don’t they move and live in a country with plenty of sun. Like Greece.

  8. “Until that issue is solved, the government can give them away free and few people will want one.” We’d take one free, thank you, if only as an air-conditioned sitting room for use in hot, humid weather.

  9. Thinking further; if we used it as a stationary living room, we could presumably fit solar panels on it?

  10. Bloke not in Cymru

    @tim Newman
    That’s one use case and I agree electric isn’t going to work for my summer camping trips in the Rockies.

    What I would like is one as our second car, small (but enough room for 2 people and hockey kit in the back) and used for commuting, day to day stuff and odd small trip. Price and length of payback puts me off. I’ve seen quite a few tesla’s on the sea to sky highway and I suspect the fact you can drive to whistler on a full charge is one of their selling points.

  11. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I seem to remember doing a back-of-the-envelope calculation here about how long it would take to deliver the energy contained in ten gallons of petrol through an electrical cable. Unless you were bunging arc welder currents around at fairly high voltage it was a loooong time. Not too hard, so I’ll do it again. Petrol’s about 150 MJ/gallon. Moving 1.5 GJ about in anything under a few hours is a challenge. It’s about a month’s energy consumption for the average UK household. Even 200A at 300V is almost 7 hours, assuming 100% efficiency. Something of a safety hazard. If you crowbarred yourself across a source like that you’d be a crispy critter.

  12. @BlokeInCostaCoffee
    Wouldnt it be easier all round if we just used a thermal power source to cook CO2 and water into a carbon neutral synthetic hydrocarbon that could be used as a natty and easily portable store of energy?

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