You’re not helping here sunshine

On the subject of Columbus Day:

Tribal Chairman Reyn Leno of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde in Portland shared the same sentiment. “We’ve been here for hundreds of thousands of years, and we’ve been shy about telling our own story,” he said. “I think that has led the public to have a lot of interest in what we do.”

Rank ignorance of human history isn’t all that helpful.

40 thoughts on “You’re not helping here sunshine”

  1. He is helping – he is lying about how long “they” have been there to strengthen his cause. He won’t be challenged on it, as white people accept everything said by ‘indigenous’ people as absolutely true, as a number of amusing fraud cases in the past demonstrate.

    According to Wikipedia:

    “The Americas were populated by humans at least as early as 14,800 years ago,[6] though there is great uncertainty about the exact time and manner in which the Americas were populated”.

    I expect the “great uncertainty” doesn’t stretch from 14,800 years to “hundreds of thousands of years”.

  2. “The day is always a controversial one, as it glorifies a man who launched a large-scale genocide and European colonization.”

    Did he?!! He launched it? As in deliberately set it running? I don’t think so.

  3. Tribal Chairman Reyn Leno of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde in Portland shared the same sentiment. “We’ve been here for hundreds of thousands of years

    Hmmm…

    Guy looks about as Red Indian as one of Tony Soprano’s paisanos.

    So how Injun is he?

    Reynold L. Leno was born Oct. 6, 1950, the son of Orville and Ramona (McKnight) Leno. He is the grandson of David and Emma Leno and Thomas and Elvira McKnight.

    His tribal name is Dances-with-Cannoli

  4. The “Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde in Portland” haven’t been in the Americas for 14,800 years. Most likely, they showed up fairly recently. There were successive waves of migration, over thousands of years. Each one pushing the previous further south. So, way up in Oregon, his ancestors would have been relative newcomers.

  5. Are these people a real tribe? Do I need to invoke Poe’s law?

    Those pictures just looked so ….jokey…full of satire….dumb….

  6. Rob – as a cat, I approve.

    Salamander – are you suggesting there may be ulterior motives to people like Jon George claiming to be Injuns?

    Since 1996, the tribes have generated most of their income by operating the Spirit Mountain Casino in Grand Ronde near Lincoln City, Oregon. […]

    The tribes oppose the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs’ plans to build an off-reservation casino in Cascade Locks, Oregon. They spent more than $800,000 on trying to influence decisions on the issue in the 2006 primary races for Governor of Oregon.[3]

    Red Indians use every part of the dollar.

  7. Steve

    “Mrs Columbo is a big admirer of yours” as the one-eyed guy in the raincoat and the Peugeot 403 used to say.

  8. Everyone was killing each other back in the 15th century. If the native Americans had advanced as far as big ships and the same level of science that the Europe/Asia/Africa blob had reached and we hadn’t, I’m damn sure they’d have had conquistadors murdering people in Cornwall and Brittany.

    Losers whine about their forgotten history. Winners murder people in foreign lands, populate them with their own people, and then fuck the prom queen.

  9. I dunno. I get very confused with the left and this stuff. So there’s a very small number of people (Red Injuns, as was) living on a giant land mass with loads of space and another small bunch of people arrive and want to live there and share this vast continent. I thought that was good – diversity, cultural enrichment and so on?

  10. Bloke in Costa Rica

    A genetic assay reveals that the first H. sapiens to arrive in the Americas, presumably over the Bering land bridge, were displaced by successive waves of migration all the way down to Tierra del Fuego. The current crop of shaftees where previously the shafters, so they can wind their necks in. This timorous acquiescence to unscientific nonsense is pitiful. Look at how close Kennewick Man got to being reburied without any investigation, despite the fact that he bore about as much ancestral linkage with current inhabitants of the area as I do with the average guy in Chalcolithic-era Serbia.

  11. “I dunno. I get very confused with the left and this stuff. So there’s a very small number of people (Red Injuns, as was) living on a giant land mass with loads of space ”

    Probably because the “history” of the Americas is mostly propaganda.
    Let’s start with your “Red Indians”, as portrayed in a cinema near you. The Plains Indians’ lifestyle dates from shortly after the arrival of Europeans. The horse had been extinct in the Americas for several thousand years before settlers horses strayed or were stolen & got into Indian hands. The vast herds of buffalo (actualy bison – but what the heck) were ,at the time, a fairly recent phenomenon. There’s very few buffalo bones turn up in middens, before. The likeliest explanation is another animal or animals suffered a population crisis & the buffalo population expanded to fill the ecological niche. Grazing by buffalo altered the vegetation balance of the Plains. They may not have even been “Plains” before the buffalo grazed them. Pastures are dynamic, not stable.
    The forests of N. America were also a recent occurrence. A wave of disease epidemics spread out through the indigenous populations. Brought by Europeans to peoples who had no natural resistance. So the land the settlers were expanding westwards into was agricultural land, recently depopulated & allowed to return to nature.
    Something like 95% of the population of the Americas died in the two centuries following Columbus. But there also seem to have been some major dislocations around the end of the first millennium,. Particularly in Central America & the regions to north & south. Disease again? Maybe introduced by Viking voyagers? Who knows?
    Myth: The wheel was not invented in the Americas. Untrue. The principal of the wheel was well understood. They made wheeled toys for children. But the Americas lacked an indigenous draught animal. So no carts, no chariots, no use for it. Didn’t stop them building thousands of miles of paved foot-roads, though. Over some of the steepest, most difficult terrain in the world.
    In the first millenium, at least, civilisation in the Americas was at a level comparable with the east. We narrowly escaped being discovered by them.
    The Brazilian rain-forest was not a natural wilderness. It was heavily populated & probably “gardened”. The dispersion of trees doesn’t follow any likely natural pattern.

  12. The problem with history is that most of what is taught is just stories for children to make it easier to understand and that means picking out individuals and specific dates.
    I believe other parts of the America’s call it discovery day or America day.
    Also its one of the holidays that isn’t mandatory in its observation in the US and I’m sure the fact it falls on Canadian thanksgiving day isn’t a coincidence.

  13. “civilisation in the Americas was at a level comparable with the east”: no bronze, no iron; bit of a disadvantage that.

    “We narrowly escaped being discovered by them.” Most unlikely. There’s no evidence of ocean-going vessels is there? Is there any chance that Aztecs would have built ocean-going craft, crossed the Gulf of Mexico, and then the Atlantic? You might as well believe the Irish sailed on stone boats to America. (And at least the irish, or maybe the Scots, did use wooden boats to get to Iceland before the Vikings arrived.)

  14. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Peter Simple did the whole Aztecs crossing the Atlantic in stone boats to settle in Nerdley thing and agitate for council-funded ziggurats to perform human sacrifice.

  15. 14,800 years ago this guy’s immigrant ancestors killed off all the megafuanas. That’s Latin for Big Bambis.
    Bastards.

  16. “Columbus Day” was made a holiday not so much to honor Columbus but as a response to pressure from second and third generation Italian immigrants to the USA, to show they were now a part of ‘mainstream’ society. The same is true for Martin Luther King Day and blacks. If the Irish immigration had happened later St. Patrick’s Day would have been a holiday too.

  17. ““Columbus Day” was made a holiday not so much to honor Columbus but as a response to pressure from second and third generation Italian immigrants to the USA”

    Yes, exactly. Here in Illinois they made Casmir Pulaski Day a state holiday to placate the Poles who wanted their own holiday just like the Italians. Pulaski at least cam here and did something, unlike Columbus, who never set foot in what is now the USA.

  18. Well, I think everyone in the world should celebrate Columbus Day. Tomatoes, pineapples, potatoes, peppers, bananas. Imagine no chicken tikka or pizza or pommes frites or pineapple upside-down cake.

    Course, if we’re going to celebrate trade routes, we might need a Ghenghis Khan Day too.

  19. @Dearieme
    “no bronze, no iron; bit of a disadvantage that.”

    There is something remarkably weird about the civilisations of the Americas. They had copper & used it for tools. They had sophisticated metal working & understanding of alloys. So there’s no apparent reason they couldn’t have graduated to bronze & you could build an entire technological civilisation on bronze. It’s an excellent engineering metal.
    Their cultures were certainly extremely sophisticated. They had the largest cities on the planet, in their day. Europe didn’t get to a million inhabitants plus until hundreds of years later.
    Maybe it’s as simple as that lack of a draft animal. If the only way of moving the ores etc around is carrying them on their backs, the effort of bringing the constituants together is prohibitive.
    Or maybe they were wired slightly wrong in their heads. Their cultures do seem overly ritualistic. And that trait is opposed to innovation. Which could also be a wired in attribute. Depends how much you think genetics is responsible for how people think. And being descended from the relatively few individuals who made the Siberia/Alaska transit, the original inhabitants of the Americas do have a low genetic diversity.

  20. > And being descended from the relatively few individuals who made the Siberia/Alaska transit, the original inhabitants of the Americas do have a low genetic diversity.

    You’d think they’d have a big helping of sheer bloody-mindedness, though. Which is one of the major building blocks of progress.

  21. I think the may have had a more than adequate “helping of sheer bloody-mindedness”
    What with the human sacrifices ‘n that 🙂

  22. Seems to me that the civilisations which advanced furthest invented the wheel. I dont think the Incas and the Aztecs had wheels and certainly noone in Africa did. The Chinese did, as did the Indians. What did the west have that noone else did I wonder – apart from educated women? Hmmm!

  23. So Much For Subtlety

    bloke in spain – “Their cultures were certainly extremely sophisticated. They had the largest cities on the planet, in their day. Europe didn’t get to a million inhabitants plus until hundreds of years later.”

    Be careful with modern estimates. It is unlikely that they did get to a million people. It is possible that people are counting the farm land for miles around – which in Mexico was small plots in the middle of canals.

    After all, whatever people claim for, say, Cordoba under the Muslims, there is precisely no archaeological evidence for it at all. Historical accounts are rarely given under oath.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *