Idiot, idiot, absolute fucking idiot

What worries me is that junior doctors are being provoked into action by a government intent on saying that the NHS is failing and that staff won’t work for it and so market solutions that break up any notion of national pay grades must be introduced to ensure that healthcare can be provided by a broken and demoralised profession serving the interests of private capital and not patient need in the future.

Despite differences in living costs around the country, despite various different places being more or less desirable to live in, there must of course only be national pay scales.

Well, it’s an opinion.

And I worry because we know such a model – the US model that people like Jeremy Hunt are known to want – does not work.

That’s a bit of a leap. And it really is the Murphaloon’s next line. No national pay scales is equivalent to a health care system paid for by largely employer paid private insurance. no, really, it is.

How do I know this? The FT reports this morning that:

UnitedHealth, the largest US health insurer, on Thursday dealt a significant blow to President Barack Obama’s signature policy by threatening to withdraw from insurance exchanges that have helped sharply reduce the number of Americans without healthcare cover.

Why did it do that?

UnitedHealth said it was struggling to make a profit on the plans it offered through the exchanges, prompting it to scale back marketing of the products and to start a review of whether it should abandon the scheme altogether.

From that we might assume that government intervention into health care insurance pricing doesn’t work out quite as well as some thought it would. Big surprise, eh?

So the junior doctors are striking for you, for the sake of healthcare for all, and for keeping healthcare costs in the UK under control. It would be great if the mainstream media recognised that fact. But I won’t hold my breath.

And our conclusion is that junior doctors are striking for higher pay so as to make health care cheaper for us.

From which I guess we must conclude that a batch of really good hallucinogens have just hit Downham Market.

18 thoughts on “Idiot, idiot, absolute fucking idiot”

  1. What worries me is that junior doctors are being provoked into action by a government intent on saying that the NHS is failing and that staff won’t work for it and so market solutions that break up any notion of national pay grades must be introduced to ensure that healthcare can be provided by a broken and demoralised profession serving the interests of private capital and not patient need in the future.

    Looks like the full stops went on strike too.

  2. Junior doctors straight out of medical school must acquire skills and commonsense before they become useful, August intake making be ill on the NHS particularly risky to the patient. Junior doctors are on a training track to become senior doctors after which their mouths will be stuffed with gold. They will reach this level with half the experience of previous generations of consultants. Meanwhile the third world doctors who keep the system creaking over, especially in the more inhospitable parts of the UK, do not complain about being barred from progression, on the job training or the pay they receive.

  3. He’s delegated the writing to Bob Newheart’s infinite number of monkeys who, in the circumstances, are doing amazing work.

    By the time Sol sets for the last time, they might have written something that makes sense.

  4. Surely the answer is for junior doctors’ pay to be increased and GPs’ pay to be reduced to cover it?

    Has anyone suggested that to Ritchie?

  5. After months and months of junior doctors complaining on Facebook that they fear for the wellbeing of the patients, and not their own, they have decided to go on strike. Whose wellbeing again?

  6. ‘insurance exchanges that have helped sharply reduce the number of Americans without healthcare cover.’

    False. Libtards don’t need facts, they can make up their own.

  7. One of the advantages of national pay scales in that young trained people can settle in areas of low house prices and maximise their spending power doing some good in areas that need caring people. If you have regional pay scales no one will ever work in the dumpy areas .

  8. You would have thought private health care and competing providers would be better for doctors as there would be a market for their services rather than a single monolithic organisation. Maybe the conspiracy should be attached to them not the gov’t.

  9. DBCR as usual writes ridiculous rubbish. He wants a return to the impoverished 1950s, when everyone was as poor and as disadvantaged as him, apart from the Lord of the manor and the local doctor.

  10. @Reed If you have regional pay scales no one will ever work in the dumpy areas

    You appear not to have grasped how markets work. If you have regional pay rates, you can increase pay in those areas where you want people to work and reduce it where you don’t. Not too hard to understand.

  11. One of the advantages of national pay scales in that young trained people can settle in areas of low house prices and maximise their spending power doing some good in areas that need caring people. If you have regional pay scales no one will ever work in the dumpy areas .

    Yeah I bet that happens all the time. If you’re a caring person why would you be bothered about your pay scale, wouldn’t you be doing the job you really wanted to do irrespective ? That’s not a rhetorical question either, I know someone who has actually done that.

    You might like to consider that national pay scales and the restricting agreements that sometimes go with them are a disadvantage to those willing to move to a job they prefer. Again I have personal experience of that because I fell foul of such a system some thirty years ago.

  12. And of course well all know that the introduction of the NHS in 1948 killed off all UK private healthcare schemes, didn’t it.

  13. “… junior doctors are striking for higher pay…”
    That’s wrong. Hunt wants doctors to spread their working hours more evenly so as to improve evening weekend hospital care. But under the existing pay arrangement, that would be expensive, because junior doctors get paid overtime rates for evenings and weekends. So Hunt’s package eliminates overtime pay for evening and Saturday work, but increases the basic rate, in a way that he says will be cost neutral overall. If it’s cost neutral, some doctors will gain and some will lose – the ones currently working unsocial hours will have their pay cut.

    A 98% yes vote for a doctors’ strike is pretty remarkable. Hunt seems to have gone out of his way to upset the doctors by announcing the terms rather than try to negotiate them. The junior doctors are striking to stop some of them having their pay cut other than by a negotiated agreement.

    “Junior doctors straight out of medical school…”
    Yes, but “junior doctors” means all hospital doctors who aren’t consultants. That’s nearly 60% of hospital doctors.

  14. A 98% yes vote for a doctors’ strike is pretty remarkable.

    Being remarkable does rather depend on the turnout. (NB I have no idea whether the turnout in this particular strike ballot was high, or the more usual ~20%)

  15. One of the biggest bones of contention in the pending doctor’s strike was basically that Hunt sat down with 23 proposals and told then only one was negotiable. (It was something about relocation expenses which don’t even apply to most junior doctors.) the pay and hours look like they are being turned back to a way of working that actually been shown to kill more patients.

    Cutting salaries is one of the only ways they can save money, but the pill could really have been sweetened a lot more. Hunt genuinely seems not to care at all if the strike goes ahead – he will probably find the public much more sympathetic to doctors than they are to conservative politicians fiddling with the NHS.

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