Blimey

Bit of a shock, eh?

Singer David Bowie has died at the age of 69 following a battle with cancer.
His son director Duncan Jones confirmed the news and a statement was released on his official social media accounts.
“David Bowie died peacefully today surrounded by his family after a courageous 18-month battle with cancer,” it said.

Hadn’t even heard a whisper of this.

What I’ve always thought of as the oddity of his career (err, yes, sorry) was that I always took him to be an actor rather than a musician. He was a very talented indeed musician and in his straight acting roles not all that good an actor. But I always took every song to be “an act”, almost a three or four minute turn as if, almost, in music hall or something. Hmm, not quite expressing this quite right.

If Mariah Carey comes out and sings a song you know it’s Mariah Carey singing a song. Same with Aretha, etc. And yes, you’ll know Bowie’s voice but it’s just not the same. The songs, their arrangements, they’re, to me at least, little scenes and they often come from very different parts of the artistic or musical landscape.

No, I’m still not getting this across properly. But he just seemed to approach the whole thing in an entirely different manner. Create the character, the idea, first, then have songs that explore or explain that, rather than saying “Here’s a musical idea and here’s me doing it.”

As an example of this I’m not really aware of anyone who covered his songs. He wrote with an for others of course, but that’s different.

Hmm, anyway, Vale. For he did create some blindingly good little three and four minute scenes which is more than most of us will ever be able to boast.

86 thoughts on “Blimey”

  1. First Lemmy, now Bowie — having a birthday seems to be terminally bad for your health for rock stars this winter.

    >I’m not really aware of anyone who covered his songs.
    Nirvana covered “The Man who Sold the World”, in a version I’ve heard a few times on rock radio. All the rest the internet tells me about are “literally, who?”

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    Beyond words really. I had no idea at all either.

    Bowie is one of those people who really did benefit from the post-war world. Someone who failed his 11 Plus but still went a long way due to the world the Americans created.

  3. Only saw him live once, and it was with fucking Tin Machine.

    Mind you, I’ve only ever been a greatest hits kind of fan.

  4. Gutted. A true star.

    And it was more than 3 or 4 minute acts, Tim. It was whole swathes of personalities.

    Shows how much you know about art.

  5. Can only repeat what others have said. Genius. Absolute sodding genius.

    A bit of a miracle he made it through the 70s with Iggy and Lou Reed.

    So many great songs, but even with the golden early 70s stuff my favourite is Heroes played at blistering (and I mean blood outing from the ear drums) volume.

  6. Arnald, that’s exactly the point I’m trying to make. That there were many of them is quite my point. Swathes of them indeed, in a manner that few to no other musicians do. Which is why I’m saying more of an actor: simply because that is what he did.

  7. For me, Bowie is a strange one. Some of his work I really quite like, others I just can’t stand. Particularly the period where his voice started to become a self-parody (similar to the way Dylan’s did), sounding like someone trying to do an exaggerated Bowie voice.

  8. The left in action?

    What? Having an opinion? On a thread like this?

    It’s an insult to say he was just an actor. At least I’m on topic. You twat.

  9. Arnald, I didn’t say he was just an actor. I actually said he was an incredibly talented musician. Vastly better than you or I (yes, I did indeed make a couple of records in my youth). But that he was an actor n a sense that almost all other musicians are not.

  10. I wasn’t a fan, I’m afraid. I can’t honestly say I was a Motorhead fan either, enjoying Ace of Spades and that’s about it. I do appreciate that both were pretty good though (I’ve always been able to separate “good” with “what I like”).

    I do object to you mentioning Aretha right after Mariah Carey, though.

  11. OK Tim. You concede you’re not getting it across.

    I disagree with your interpretation that he designed his songs around a character. That’s all. Apologies for the harshness.

  12. FWIW Tim, I liked your description of ‘Bowie the Actor’. To me it explains part of what made him stand out.
    I, and many of my school mates, really loved Bowie – despite that being the 80s, and the only ‘cool’ music at school at that time was rap. Somehow his music appealed to us all – despite the musical boundaries put in place by a bunch of 13yr olds!
    Very shocked & sad that he has gone.

  13. If I was down to my last two-bob his discs wouldn’t be the ones I selected on the juke box, but the lad remains part of my cultural soundtrack.

  14. No, I get it. Kate Bush did it, to a lesser extent, injecting theatre into it. Bauhaus, hugely influenced by Bowie, were similar.

    There are few covers out there. Beck’s version of Sound and Vision is pretty good, and Bauhaus’ version of Ziggy Stardust.

    He was an OK to good screen actor. I got the feeling he got roles because he could bring in an audience and act a bit, but my guess is that people probably didn’t pay him much. Most of his films were pretty low budget, like The Hunger or The Last Temptation of Christ.

  15. Sorry that he has died. Not esp a fan but Ashes to Ashes (not trying to be ironic) was an interesting song/video.

    Another part of everybody’s life gone.

    Sorry for his family and also that he wont be producing any more songs etc. If he had lived to his 90s he would doubtless have continued to develop artistically.

  16. Just think that if only he had restricted his alcohol consumption in line with official recommendations, Bowie might – just might – have lived another couple of years.

  17. And, let’s be fair, The Man Who Fell To Earth was garbage, typical of the nihilistic poo-fountain that was New Wave science fiction.

    But he made up for it in Terry Jones and Jim Henson’s Labyrinth.

  18. I always took him to be an actor rather than a musician

    Yes, but that’s probably true of all a rock (and pop) stars. They aren’t musicians – most are musically sub-literate: they are entertainers who put on an act. Nothing wrong with that, of course; though in the main I simply don’t ‘get’ rock music, so perhaps I’m missing something.

  19. And yet he risked it all, everything, his entire reputation, his place in history, when he made that video for…

    Dancing in The Street

    With Mick Jagger.

  20. Not sure if I mentioned how much I hate The Man Who Fell To Earth, but the plot was spectacularly mongtarded.

    Alien David Bowie (which was brilliant casting, there was something elegantly offworld about him) comes to Earth to ship water back to his drought-riddled planet.

    Because this is a 70’s New Wave sci-fi flick, he wastes his time having off-putting sex and pretentious psychadelic hallucinations, so everybody ends up dead or miserable.

    But the kicker is – if your planet was thirsty, the most window-licking solution imaginable would be to do what Bowie’s character did.

    Space is full of free water. Just round up some asteroids or comets and nudge them into orbit around your planet – no need to waste stupendous amounts of energy and time shipping it up the gravity well from a planet in another star system.

    Bloody art students.

  21. AndrewC – the back story to the Dancing In The Street video is that two uncles get kicked out of a wedding reception after snorting cocaine in the toilet.

  22. “Just round up some asteroids or comets and nudge them into orbit around your planet”

    and don’t hit the wrong number on your calculator…:)

  23. Tim Newman,

    I’ve got to say, one of my first reactions was “oh good, social media is going to be rammed with “RIP David Bowie” messages from every man and his dog”. Lemmy’s about the worst case of that yet. The man was pretty much forgotten for decades, then along come all these “RIP Lemmy” people, like they’ve ever seen Hawkwind live or even own anything more than 1 single. None of these people were turning up to shows when Motorhead were playing back rooms of pubs.

    My own feeling with Bowie: I really love Suffragette City. I like Changes, Heroes, The Man Who Sold the World, but it’s a little cool and detached for my tastes. As you say, the craft is good, though. I’ve listened to more ABBA and Phil Spector stuff in the past few years than Bowie.

  24. PF – and don’t hit the wrong number on your calculator…:)

    Which they probably would, then they’d just sit there drinking and looking sad, because it’s a Nicolas Roeg film.

  25. The whole actor or singer argument seems to have been settled by a recorded interview with Bowie on BBC News minutes ago in which he said he felt entirely happy on stage playing somebody else and from that point on ” created character after character” .

  26. “no need to waste stupendous amounts of energy and time shipping it up the gravity well from a planet in another star system.”

    Presumably this decision was made on “settled science” and the deniers who questioned sending one flaky individual on such a ridiculous solution were killed in reeducation camps a few weeks before everyone else died of thirst.

  27. Theo,
    “Yes, but that’s probably true of all a rock (and pop) stars. They aren’t musicians – most are musically sub-literate”

    Rubbish. Musical literacy isn’t a pre-condition for stardom, hence The Clash say, however you couldn’t accuse Motown or Stax of lacking it.

    Neither is musical literacy a pre-condition for good music. Look at Jazz.

  28. Steve,

    I remember the cool kids telling me about The Man Who Fell to Earth, staying up to watch it and hating it. I tried it again as an adult, and still hate it.

  29. Bloke no Longer in Austria

    Covers: Philip Glass wrote a symphony based on Heroea, bloody good it is too.

    Acting: “Man Who Fell to Earth” was the fault of Nicholas Roeg – I don’t like his films. Brilliant cinematographer well dodgy director.
    I’m not sure that I’d characterise The Hunger as being low budget. It does have one of the most erotic scenes in cinema where nothing actually happens, when Ctaherine Deneuve seduces Susan Sarandon.
    Bowie also made an appearence as a ghost in the movie version of Twin Peaks.

  30. Bloke no Longer in Austria

    I forgot to mention, Peter Noone, the bloke with all those teeth covered Oh You Pretty Things.

  31. Bloke No Longer in Austria,

    Depends where you draw the line for “low budget”. It certainly wasn’t a big budget film. It was mostly shot in a studio, or with a few New York locations. Limited special effects, bit of make up. It looks great, because Tony Scott had a really good eye (the one redeeming thing about Top Gun is how great some of the flying shots are).

  32. Hmmm Tim…

    Maybe it is that he could present a Character in those three or 4 minutes of music better than an hour-long performance on a stage.

    Synergy of lyrics, music, and visuals into one, compact, layered snapshot of a personality.
    Actual bona-fide multimedia art worthy of the use of “synergy”.

  33. I’ve seen Lemmy multiple times with both Motorhead and Hawkwind, so there.

    As to Bowie, it is sad that he has died of cancer as with anyone. But I always wondered who buys his music, at least after the 1970s. Like Rod Stewart. The Ziggy Stardust thing was a thing, and Heroes is a good tune. But other than that, not much to say really.

  34. Oh, and I reckon I listen to a Bowie album at least once a week. Recently I’ve been mostly listening to Low. Before that it was Hunky Dory.

  35. The funny thing is that as a 50-year-old English man, brought up listening to music in the 70s and 80s, I wasn’t a Bowie fan until the more poppy stuff (China Girl, etc) came along. As I have got older, I started to listening to some of the earlier material; Station to Station is one of my favourites.

    I think I can understand what Tim is getting at. The best way I think of it is that Bowie was a polymath who lived the characters he sung about to an extent that was and remains unusual.

    And underneath all the oddity etc, there was a core of a very likeable, friendly south London geezer who had his feet on the ground.

    I am very saddened to hear of his passsing, and my condolences to his family, friends, and many fans.

  36. Musical literacy isn’t a pre-condition for stardom, hence The Clash say,

    Jack C

    I agree. That’s my point really: it’s entertainment rather than music. And the triumph of marketing over talent.

    Neither is musical literacy a pre-condition for good music. Look at Jazz.

    Musical literacy is a necessary — but not sufficient — condition of good music.

  37. Rob – Presumably this decision was made on “settled science” and the deniers who questioned sending one flaky individual on such a ridiculous solution were killed in reeducation camps a few weeks before everyone else died of thirst.

    You’re probably right, and it serves the bloody aliens right for trying to roll back the unique biodiversity of the drylands. Thank Gaia their plan to poison the planet with dihydrogen monoxide failed.

    The Stigler – I remember the cool kids telling me about The Man Who Fell to Earth, staying up to watch it and hating it. I tried it again as an adult, and still hate it.

    Yes, because it’s shite masquerading as profundity. The 70’s was the fountainhead of fucktarded ideas, and you see it in most of the science fiction movies of that era:

    * Soylent Green – Malthus was right!!!
    * THX1138 – THE MAN is keeping everybody down. For… reasons.
    * A Boy And His Dog – nothing in the irradiated postapocalyptic wasteland is more horrifying than small-town American life.
    * Silent Running – won’t somebody please think of the trees?
    * Rollerball – like, the corporations are all, like, little Eichmanns, man!
    * Zardoz – Just say no.

    New Wave science fiction was a hippie toddler tantrum against golden age sci-fi’s obsession with ray guns and robots and square-jawed heroes like Dan Dare or Flash Gordon doing square-jawed manly stuff in space.

    To be fair, those tropes were pretty stale by 1960, but the new wavers’ obsessions with odd sex and drugs and nihilism and anticapitalism and annoying the bourgeoisie weren’t an improvement.

    And they threw out old-fashioned ideas like having a plot, likeable protagonists, and fun.

    I absolutely despise passive protagonists, so The Man Who Fell To Earth is maddening. I had a similar feeling on seeing “Never Let Me Go”.

  38. Lovely set of fado covers on the soundtrack of ‘the life aquatic with Steve Zizzou’.

    His 70’s and early 80’s stuff was defining for 1 1/2 generations. But pretty much everything after Let’s Dance (which I don’t like, but was his most successful album) was close to unlistenable, and always hyped with the untrue ’back to his best’ crap from pr whore journalists.

    He had an unusual and fickle muse.

    Stevie Ray was dropped from the Serious Moonlight tour for demanding more money.

  39. Theo-

    Music is entertainment. If you’re not entertained, why are you listening to it? It’s an emotional experience, not an intellectual one.

    There is intellectual pleasure of course to be had in analysing and understanding musical theory and harmony, etc. But it still ought to be entertaining to listen to.

    If you forget that, you end up with jazz.

  40. The man was pretty much forgotten for decades, then along come all these “RIP Lemmy” people, like they’ve ever seen Hawkwind live or even own anything more than 1 single.

    Indeed. I was reminded of that in this post, hence I STFU. When Chuck Berry goes, however…

  41. “Musical literacy is a necessary — but not sufficient — condition of good music.”

    In which case, what do you mean by “Musical literacy”?

  42. Ian B,

    “I’ve seen Lemmy multiple times with both Motorhead and Hawkwind, so there.”

    Sure. And plenty of other people. I’m not knocking the sincere fans that were sad at his demise, just the social signalling tourists. It’s like with family funerals. I didn’t go to my aunt’s 2 years ago. My mother told me and said “I’m guessing you’re not going” and didn’t mind because she knew I didn’t know her, hadn’t seen her in 35 years (and that was my grandfather’s funeral). If we hadn’t even exchanged Christmas cards in 35 years, did we give a shit about each other? It would have felt odd for me to go.

    “As to Bowie, it is sad that he has died of cancer as with anyone. But I always wondered who buys his music, at least after the 1970s. Like Rod Stewart. The Ziggy Stardust thing was a thing, and Heroes is a good tune. But other than that, not much to say really.”

    There are fans who just keep on buying out of hope, of recapturing the earlier magic, and it’s generally foolish. When someone starts putting out mediocre stuff after their first 4 or 5 albums, it’s very unlikely to get much better. I’m never sure if it’s bottled up creativity that’s all gone, or the effect of lots of money removing incentives, or age, or families.

  43. Steve,

    Haven’t seen Rollerball for quite a few years but I remember the action scenes themselves being fucking brutal! Stuntmen definitely earnt their pay on that one.

    The only other thing I recall is James Caan looking very very stoned walking around in a turtle neck jumper.

  44. When someone starts putting out mediocre stuff after their first 4 or 5 albums, it’s very unlikely to get much better. I’m never sure if it’s bottled up creativity that’s all gone, or the effect of lots of money removing incentives, or age, or families.

    I think it’s just that most people only really have One Thing, and that one thing is initially new and exciting, but after a few albums they are either still doing the same thing, in which case they are “stale”, or they have to try doing something else, which is unlikely to be as good.

    It’s often best I think if they just do the One Great Thing then fuck off, like the Sex Pistols.

  45. Four great albums – Hunky Dory, Man Who Sold the World, Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane, some legacy for a great man

    “Neither is musical literacy a pre-condition for good music. Look at Jazz.”

    I would almost prefer to be fisted by Richard Murphy than have to endure listening to jazz – almost.

  46. TimN,

    Huh, genuinely thought Chuck B had already made the trip to the Great Ding a Ling in the sky. 89 years old!

  47. Dan – Yarp, brutal is the word.

    And – stoned or sober – James Caan was a believable tough guy leading man. He looked like he could dish out a kicking. Not too many of them in Hollywood any more.

    Leonardo DiCaprio couldn’t take on a hen party in Newcastle.

  48. “I’m never sure if it’s bottled up creativity that’s all gone, or the effect of lots of money removing incentives, or age, or families.”

    I think its money. When you’re young and poor, life’s shit. When you look back with hindsight (and money) it looks like a golden time, but the reality was it was shit. And its that shitness that gives the artistic mind something to work with. Once the $$$ roll in, and you have the big house and flash car, and plenty of drink, drugs and blondes on tap, artistically the work goes downhill. Thats not to say you can’t still be very commercially successful, but thats a result of astute career management rather than artistic creativity. Bowie probably remained creative longer than most as he didn’t actually make much money in the 70s. It wasn’t until the commercial stuff in the 80s that the money appeared, and surprise, surprise, the muse deserted him.

  49. Yeah – that scene in Godfather where he batters the scumbag who’d been slapping his sister around is still a good watch.

    Leo might be a wet but he’s never presented himself as a tough guy actor. There’s is a distinct lack of testosterone on the screen nowadays. Russell Crowe has got it I reckon, even if he’s looking a bit wheezy nowadays. Not exactly an A List star but Brendan Gleeson has ‘it’ too.

    I always though James Gandolfini managed to project hardness, even though he had to lug his gut and lisp around with him.

  50. Huh, genuinely thought Chuck B had already made the trip to the Great Ding a Ling in the sky.

    Most people are surprised he’s still alive. I remember being surprised he was still alive in the 1990s!

  51. IanB

    Music is entertainment. If you’re not entertained, why are you listening to it?

    Quite so, taking ‘entertainment’ in a broad sense. But Rock and Pop are more entertainment than music.

    It’s an emotional experience, not an intellectual one.

    It’s both, to some extent. And music that is rewarding on both levels is superior to music that is rewarding on just one. (Similarly, in poetry, Shakespeare is a greater poet than Maya Angelou, because the former is an intellectual and an emotional experience and the latter is – at best – an emotional one.)

    There is intellectual pleasure of course to be had in analysing and understanding musical theory and harmony, etc. But it still ought to be entertaining to listen to.

    I don’t disagree

    If you forget that, you end up with jazz.

    Or Schoenberg.

    Jack C

    what do you mean by “Musical literacy”?

    Musical literacy is an understanding of musical ‘language’, just as English literacy is an understanding of the English language. An adult with a vocabulary of a few hundred words and limited ability in sentence construction is sub-literate. Similarly, someone who knows only a half a dozen chords and can keep to a simple beat is musically sub-literate. That said, the musically sub-literate tend to be more entertaining than those sub-literate in English.

  52. He didn’t do much fighting in that one though – Scorsese, a man who obviously knows his onions, let the others (including Gleeson now I think about it) do most of the scrapping.

    There was that scene where he beat a tough looking boozer in a one on one pub fight, but it wasn’t totally jarring.

    Dicaprio is best playing slimy, smirky little twats. He was effin brilliant in Wolf of Wall Street. He’s got a new one out soon where he’s hunting a bear back in olden days. Give that one a miss I think. The Edge, with Al Baldwin and Tony Hopkins is unbeatable in the ‘Man vs Bear’ genre.

  53. Dicaprio is best playing slimy, smirky little twats.

    I used to think that, but I reckon he turned that around partially with The Aviator and never looked back after Shutter Island, Inception, and Django Unchained. Considering how much I hated him in the Titanic/The Beach era, I am surprised that I now consider him a genuine heavyweight actor who is one of the few I will make a point of going to the cinema to watch.

  54. Steve,

    The American New Wave was mostly a disaster, because it was about experimentation, and that came from the new, smaller, hand-held cameras bringing in a new generation of filmmakers. People made these new looking films, like Taxi Driver or Easy Rider, made some very good money, and studios just threw money at them to make more, often giving them full artistic freedom. And a lot of them lost a ton of money. Scorsese followed up Taxi Driver with a string of losses. Who knew that people didn’t want a film about a boxer who gets fat and becomes a loser? On the other hand, Rocky and Saturday Night Fever have a lot of the New Wave in them, but made boatloads of money. We think of them as being very mainstream, but only because the new wave stuff is part of the mainstream now.

  55. “The Edge, with Al Baldwin and Tony Hopkins is unbeatable in the ‘Man vs Bear’ genre.”

    Great, great film.

  56. Cinema in the 70s I think was just sort of hanging around waiting for the invention of the proper tentpole blockbuster, after its previous era of churning out all kinds of stuff ended with the rise of television.

  57. Theo,
    “Musical literacy is an understanding of musical ‘language’, just as English literacy is an understanding of the English language. An adult with a vocabulary of a few hundred words and limited ability in sentence construction is sub-literate. Similarly, someone who knows only a half a dozen chords and can keep to a simple beat is musically sub-literate. That said, the musically sub-literate tend to be more entertaining than those sub-literate in English.”

    Thanks. Nail On Head with the last sentence, and I’d agree with the rest (up to a point … re-recording music with technically better players does not guarantee an improvement). .

    However, I do think you under-estimate the talent in rock and pop music. There aren’t a great many “stars” that only know or knew a few chords. Most overnight successes did not happen overnight, and those with longevity always have something special.

    Does anyone hear like Jazz?

  58. The Stigler – you’re right. I’m not so much talking about American New Wave cinema as New Wave science fiction though.

    Though there’s a lot of crossover between the two, ‘specially in sci-fi films of that era.

    The overall sensibility was very downbeat and antiheroic.

    Interesting that George Lucas started the decade making artsy-fartsy depressathon THX 1138 and rounded it off with a stonkingly successful homage to Flash Gordon.

    Turns out that – contrary to the radical masturbation of new wave sci fi authors who derided the old guard – the public actually likes heroism, derring-do, space princesses and excitement.

    When you watch films like The Man Who Fell To Earth, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that everyone involved thought the commentary on consumerism and sex and so on was terribly clever. But it’s not.

  59. Actually I really liked The Man Who Fell to Earth when I saw it aged 16. At this time I was also a) big huge Bowie fan b) a pretentious poser and c) smoking lots of skunk. Nowadays I think I’d prefer Labyrinth.

    Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence was a decent Bowie film if memory serves.

    Nic Roeg made Walkabout and Don’t Look Now – both of which I remember liking, and neither of which I’ve seen for years.

  60. Dan – Labyrinth is, by far, the more satisfying story.

    It had everything:

    * Memorable, exciting bad guy
    * Sympathetic protagonist
    * Dramatic tension as the heroine races against time to save her baby brother
    * A plot that actually made sense within its own imagined universe
    * The Bog of Eternal Stench

    Don’t Look Now was a beautifully filmed two hour build up to a cheap jump scare.

  61. Movie I love the first time I saw them and loathed the second time I saw them, many years later-

    The Man Who Fell To Earth
    Jacob’s Ladder
    Dark Star

  62. Jack C

    “However, I do think you under-estimate the talent in rock and pop music.”

    I grant you I may have a blindspot. But so much of the genre seems to me to be over-engineered and over-produced, using a few basic chords, electronic effects and a strong beat. There is no development at all.

    “There aren’t a great many “stars” that only know or knew a few chords.”

    Oasis…

  63. Tim’s not the only one to think on those lines.

    From the Wikipedia page on Bowie:
    “Biographer David Buckley writes … “[Bowie] invented character-playing in pop, marrying theatre and popular music in one seamless, powerful whole.”

    Yes, I had to look him up because, although I’ve heard of Bowie, I couldn’t think of anything he’d actually done other than wear odd outfits. Still can’t.

  64. He wrote some great songs, produced some great performances and had a dignified retirement, respected all round and shagging one of the world’s hottest women. Not a jot less than he deserved.

    One of a few pop artists whose music a lot to me.

  65. The interview Bowie did with Paxman in 1999 was very interesting – largely backs up Timmy’s viewpoint actually. (Roughly, Bowie claims that he enjoyed the dramatic aspect of creating characters up to the 1980s when he tried to write songs for himself, to sing as himself… but doubts how successful he was at doing so.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiK7s_0tGsg

  66. I’m not a particular fan, and I don’t do maudlin celebrity grief, so I was completely unaffected for most of the day.

    And then fetching my son from school, I heard Rick Wakeman do an interview on BBC R5 where he deconstructed how Life on Mars was made, and for once I felt genuinely sad.

  67. Jeez! the emotional incontinence has been a bit much, I liked a few of his tracks but never bought any of his albums being more into prog and electronic back in the 70’s.

    Jazz is such a large umbrella , and I’ll agree free jazz is almost impossible to listen to. I like Pat Metheney, The Nice, Weather Report, Keith Jarrett, Herbie Hancock and Stanley Clarke to name a few that may, or may not be considered jazz.

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