Err, yes, this is rather the point

A formerly powerful ally of Vladimir Putin who was unexpectedly ousted from his job last year has warned other members of the president’s inner circle that they could be next.
Vladimir Yakunin, who has known Mr Putin for decades and for ten years headed Russia’s vast rail monopoly, warned that no member of Russia’s elite could be entirely safe until Mr Putin establishes a “ruling class like Russia had during Tsarist times.”
“This circle will continue to rotate,” Mr Yakunin said in an interview with Bloomberg. “Remember what happened to Boris Berezovsky and Vladimir Gusinsky,” he added, referring to two post-Soviet oligarchs who lost their empires and were forced into exile after Mr Putin came to power in 2000.

The Monarch always rather likes to keep the barons on their toes.

14 thoughts on “Err, yes, this is rather the point”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    The Monarch always rather likes to keep the barons on their toes.

    Richard Pipes has a good chapter or two on why the Russian autocrat was never like Western monarchs. One of the main differences being that Western aristocrats held their lands in their own right. Russian nobles merely held them at the whim of the Tsar and on condition of service.

    The nice thing about modern history is how much it agrees with long held prejudices. The Russians cannot transcend their history. They want to knuckle under the knout. They were unhappy until Putin obliged them.

  2. By comparison, our ruling elite has made itself much more bulletproof by avoiding allegiance to a single individual or family, instead basing their position to allegiance to a more abstracted State machinery. It’s questionable which is better for the average pleb.

    Concentrated power is actually easier to displace, since you know where it is and whom you need to get rid of, for instance.

  3. “It’s questionable which is better for the average pleb.”

    Is it really. So you think it’s a toss up between living in Britain or Russia do you?

  4. Ironman-

    Hans Herman Hoppe has argued that a monarchy is ultimately better than a democracy, in that monarchs generally want to preserve the nation for their descendants, whereas the time preference of a democratic politician is very high and all they care about is getting away with whatever they are doing for a few years even if that is ruinous further down the road.

    CS Lewis and GK Chesterton both made good arguments that a corrupt government is better than an honest one, since the former can be circumvented whereas there is nowhere to hide from the latter one.

    Even in Britain one can make a reasonable case that the lower orders had more freedom under monarchy than democracy.

    Putin at least appears to care about Russia. Our leaders don’t. They want to destroy us.

    In other words, your usual fatuous line of demanding answers to simplistic questions doesn’t really address the deeper issues.

  5. Ian B: Concentrated power is actually easier to displace, since you know where it is and whom you need to get rid of, for instance.

    True, but being so exposed and threatened, it often takes extravagant steps to remain unassailable.

  6. Ian B: Concentrated power is actually easier to displace, since you know where it is and whom you need to get rid of, for instance.

    Unfortunately it is also easier to seize, which is one reason why the Left want everything run centrally – one organisation to infiltrate and subvert.

    If you want to control education, which is easier for a small group of fanatics – capturing a department of State or thousands of individual schools?

  7. True, but that’s why the Western Left have got it just right by placing the power in the Institutions rather than specific individuals, I think.

  8. “Putin at least appears to care about Russia. Our leaders don’t. They want to destroy us.”

    Again, oh really? Putin cares about Russia, meaning cares about Russians, does he? He is better than our leaders is he? So life is better for Russians (excluding those now living in the UK of course) than it is for us is it?

    Could you send me a list of your medications so I too can get as happy as you obviously are.

  9. Hmmmm…

    So Former Privileged Bloke warns Currently Privileged Blokes the local kingpin of Priviliged Blokes can and will exercise his prerogative of absolute power if you step outside the lines too much.

    Quelle surprise.

  10. sackcloth and ashes

    ”Ian B: Concentrated power is actually easier to displace, since you know where it is and whom you need to get rid of, for instance’.

    True, but being so exposed and threatened, it often takes extravagant steps to remain unassailable’.

    And then of course, any revolutionaries who happen to be successful end up (mis)ruling in exactly the same way.

  11. Because good kings don’t live forever, and democracy is far better at managing transfers of power in a peaceful and stable way.

  12. “Can anyone tell me why life under a good king isn’t not better than life under a poor democracy?”

    You’re a spoof right? U.S. Democrats don’t actually think shit like that do they?

  13. Hans Herman Hoppe has argued that a monarchy is ultimately better than a democracy, in that monarchs generally want to preserve the nation for their descendants,

    Yes. They wish to preserve it for their descendants to further pillage for personal benefit. They don’t wish to preserve it for the good of the people.

    Any person who is very successful, like say Rupert Murdoch is a major threat. There will be a struggle for power, and either the over-mighty subject is ruined or he will become the power behind the throne. Until the next struggle.

    Any person who actually reads history will know that stable autocratic monarchies are actually quite rare. It relies on the monarch, by luck, being capable. And also at the same time not distracted by personal adventures.

    Hard luck if you get incompetents with designs above their abilities (Kaiser Wilhelm II, for example).

    Inherited monarchy is a stupid system. Abandoned pretty much anywhere anyone gets the opportunity.

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