Well, yes, except Hitler wasn’t a President

In a statement that surprised even his critics, Mr Erdogan responded to arguments that putting political power in the hands of the presidency would not work in a “unitary state”.
He said there were other examples of its being successful. “There are already examples in the world,” he said.
“You can see it when you look at Hitler’s Germany. There are later examples in various other countries.”

Hitler, of course, was Chancellor (akin to PM) and then Fuhrer, but never President.

On the other hand, do I think Erdogan is arguing for an Enabling Act? Yes, I do…..

9 thoughts on “Well, yes, except Hitler wasn’t a President”

  1. Reminds of Yes (Prime?) Minister. From memory:
    “An Enabling Act can enable anything. In this case it will enable you to lose the next election.”

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    “You can see it when you look at Hitler’s Germany. There are later examples in various other countries.”

    Despite what the Guardian may think, people overseas do actually have different values. Hitler is a good example. In much of Asia, Hitler is widely admired. In odd places too like India.

    This website may or may not show you a picture of the Hitler Techno Bar and Cocktail Show:

    http://www.who-sucks.com/people/dining-with-hitler-in-asia-hitler-themed-bars-restaurants

    Unlike Springtime for Hitler, I don’t think they are kidding either.

    If I have a point, it is that this is likely to do quite well for Erdogan. After all, he has the Islamist vote. Now he is working on the cryto-Fascist Grey Wolf pro-Attaturk vote.

  3. SMFS:the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem was a contemporary fan of Hitlers, so Erdogan is simply being consistent in his Quran based anti-Semitism. This hasn’t dulled CallmeDave’s enthusiasm for Turkey joining the EU.

  4. Wikipedia says on the death of Paul Hindenburg Hitler assumed the office of president but not usually use the title, preferring Führer und Reichskanzler (“Leader and Reich Chancellor”).

    Not that Wikipedia is ever wrong but it agrees with my dimly remembered History A level.

  5. I love it when the naive presume that Hitler is also political kryptonite in other countries.

    In much of the Muslim world, as has already been mentioned, he’s rather popular.

  6. Fussing about titles that may happen to look the same in different languages or different countries is usually the sign of a mind becoming unhinged. It would be like saying that the Doge couldn’t be President because he wasn’t called President. Or that Stalin wasn’t an Emperor because he wasn’t called Emperor.

  7. Interesting argument. If I have my German constitutional history correct, Hitler initially left the Presidency vacant. The Office was subsiquently subsumed into the Fuhrership. So one could say he was President.

  8. If I have my German constitutional history correct, Hitler initially left the Presidency vacant. The Office was subsequently subsumed into the Fuhrership. So one could say he was President.

    It’s been a while since I did my paper on the Weimar government and the foundation of Nazism, but I believe this is correct.

    Adolf wanting to have the powers of the president, but not the person (as a potential alternate-candidate), which was why the powers were subsumed, but the office left vacant.

    That’s the whole point about a cult-of-personality, there can be no distractions and even the concept of “deputy” was vaguely worded so that various figures of the Nazi party thought that they were Hitler’s political heir at one time or another.

    In the end, it ended up being Admiral Karl Dönitz, although more by accident than by choice on anyone’s part.

    Heil Dönitz!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHnyQXyuTGY

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