So let’s track how much EU money these people get then.

Letter in The Guardian:

Only inside the European Union can the UK help fight global poverty

Hmm.

Michael Anderson
CEO, Children’s Investment Fund Foundation
Valerie Amos
Former UN undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief coordinator
Owen Barder
Director of the Center for Global Development In Europe
Tanya Barron
CEO, Plan International
Mark Malloch Brown
Former UN deputy general secretary
Andrew Cahn
Chair of WWF
Rose Caldwell
Executive director, Concern Worldwide
Margaret Casely-Hayford
Chair of board of trustees of Action Aid UK
Paul Collier
Economist, University of Oxford
Brendan Gormley
Former CEO of the Disaster Emergency Committee
John Holmes
Former UN undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief coordinator
David Hulme
President of the Development Studies Association
Richard Jolly
Former assistant secretary-general of the UN
Frank Judd
Former director of Oxfam and VSO
Melissa Leach
Director, Institute of Development Studies
Simon Maxwell
Former director of the Overseas Development Institute and former president of the Development Studies Association of the UK and Ireland
Daleep Mukarji
Former CEO Christian Aid
Simon O’Connell
Executive director, Mercy Corps Europe
Ann Pettifor
Director of policy research in macroeconomics, co-founder and former Director of Jubilee 2000
Martin Tisne
Investment partner, Omidyar Network
Kevin Watkins
Director, Overseas Development Institute
Rob Williams
CEO, Warchild
Jasmine Whitbread
Former CEO of Save the Children
Professor Myles Wickstead
Visiting professor (international relations), King’s College London

So, how many of those get EU money? That is, is this just a group of little piggies squealing that the EU teat might be taken away?

Owen Barder’s new CGD Europe doesn’t seem to list donors. Mercy Corps Europe gets £3 million from the Commission and £8 million from ECHO, whatever that is.

If anyone’s got the time be interesting to see how much cash the EU splashed to get that letter.

WWF: € 600,000 minimum

Action Aid: £5 million (ECHO).

17 thoughts on “So let’s track how much EU money these people get then.”

  1. ECHO is the European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office.

    Worth noting that the aid budgets of Norway and the UK are vastly greater as a % of GDP than those of other European nations.

  2. So, been in contact with the Brexit peeps. They have no spare staff at all. Anyone want to do the legwork on this one?

  3. Worth noting that the aid budgets of Norway and the UK are vastly greater as a % of GDP than those of other European nations.

    Sorry, we’re talking about fighting global poverty. What do aid budgets have to do with anything?

  4. irrespective of everything else, this is an example of what Chris Dillow calls counter-advocacy. likely to have opposite to intended effect.

  5. It just makes so much sense. Instead of the UK giving directly to countries and causes we should gift via Brussels so that some money can be skimmed off to pay for the eager beavers of the EU. We cannot gift aid without having a broader picture and understanding that we also have a duty to keep unemployment in Belgium down.

  6. Since 2007:

    Plan International have received over 70 million euros.
    WWF have received at least 95 million euros.
    Save the Children have received over 400 million euros.
    Christian Aid have received about 48 million euros.
    Oxfam has received around 550 million euros.

    I have gathered these figures from the European Financial Transparency System. I have not looked closely at each individual grant to see how much came from the EU and how much came from the member state concerned but that information is available.(Called the Co-Financing rate – the percentage of the figure that came from the EU)

  7. I should also add that in the results from the EU FTS the headline figure for a grant is sometimes split between several recipients.

  8. Bloke in North Dorset

    The best way to help poor countries is trade if we’re outside the EU and all its tariffs and regulations it makes it much easier to trade with those countries.

    It also has the added benefit of missing out those twats in the middle.

  9. “Sorry, we’re talking about fighting global poverty. What do aid budgets have to do with anything?”

    It’s simply trickle down economics. The aid money ends up in the pockets of wealthy individuals like those listed. In theory those people buy stuff with that money providing jobs such as the security needed for local warlords to protect the golden statues which let the poors know about their excellent benevolent leadership. And something involving cheese.

  10. I pretended to my Facebook friends that I was sitting on the fence in the EU referendum. But what, I asked, are the postie arguments for the EU? Right on cue they provide sack-of-shit letters to the Guardian claiming the EU is responsible for peace in Europe (NATO doesn’t come into it), only in the EU can we eat properly (apparently restaurateurs won’t open their doors and accept our money if we’re not in the EU) and now poor people.around the world won’t accept our aid if it doesn’t come with a free EU llastic flag.

    This is bollocks. If the case case for the EU can’t be made without the most outrageous claims then the case is surely lost.

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