So when do we rise up and hang them all?

But it can now be disclosed that – to the concern of Mr Pearson’s legal team – the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) supplied original CCTV depicting the alleged assault in an amended format which gave a misleading impression of the incident.

Mark Bagshaw, the defence solicitor, said: “The CCTV was served on us in a way in which had been altered.

“The few seconds when my client walked past the alleged victim had been slowed down so it looked like he had more time to commit the alleged actions than he in reality did have.
“Instead of one frame per second it was running at one frame every two seconds.”

Mr Pearson’s legal team was forced to hire a specialist CCTV forensic expert to present the CCTV at the correct speed and then create a storyboard of the incident

I really would love to see some CPS bod come out and defend this decision. Because one of two things is true here.

1) Bagshaw, and his solicitor, are lying through their teeth.

2) We need that multi person gallows and stat.

98 thoughts on “So when do we rise up and hang them all?”

  1. “The first time the alleged victim saw the CCTV was in court, and her reaction was ‘That can’t be me in the CCTV’.”

    W…T….A….F…?!?

  2. But still, we should remember that Plod is acting this way purely because of the fierce pressure from (and entryism by) Proggies of the Feminist variety. It has also been known for a long time that the CPS is infested with hardcore feminists.

  3. Ian B,

    Tim’s original post on this subject contained a link to the Daily Mail article, which clearly states:

    Police traced him through data retrieved from his Oyster travel card.

    That’s beside the point though. Plod could just as easily have plastered his photo (from the CCTV) all over the station, with the message “Have you seen this man?” and the Crimestoppers telephone number below.

    But can he now sue for defamation?

  4. I think what IanB meant was not ‘how did they trace that man’ but ‘how did they zero in on THIS MAN as their suspect/victim’.

    Especially since the actress (I won’t use the term ‘famous, she really isn’t!) didn’t pick him out of a lineup.

  5. Where do I find this leak, Julia? Having had a thesp career, I’m kind of intrigued in case it’s somebody I worked with, kind of thing.

    And just plain nosey as well, and that.

  6. It’s all over Twitter.

    She really isn’t a household name, but has been in lots of TV bit parts, films like ‘My Beautiful Launderette’ and will be in the next season of ‘Game of Thrones’.

  7. A comment from MartinWW at the very estimable annaracoon.com on the related issue of investigating the long dead:

    “which took me directly to the following section in the College of Policing :
    —————————————
    Investigative Policing:
    Investigation is a core duty of policing. Interviewing victims, witnesses and suspects is central to the success of an investigation and the highest standards need to be upheld. Forces need to develop and maintain the valuable resource of a skilled interviewer. Interviews that are conducted professionally and quality assured realise several benefits. In particular, they can:
    • direct an investigation and gather material, which in turn can lead to a prosecution or early release of an innocent person
    • support the prosecution case, thereby saving time, money and resources
    • increase public confidence in the police service, particularly with witnesses and victims of crimes who come into direct contact with the police.
    —————————————-
    The second bulleted item leapt up and hit me in the face. Surely, it is NOT for the police to support the prosecution case, but only to gather and present evidence. It is not in their remit to pass judgement, which is something en”he

  8. @LJH

    Technically, they’re supposed to help the D too. But I can tell you that if you are charged with any offence you had better i) hire a decent solicitor and barrister or (if you cannot afford that) ii) demand to see *all* undisclosed material, because they and the CPS are very ‘forgetful’ about passing on stuff like that.

  9. I have to say, the thought of being fitted up by the British police and/or justice system is frightening indeed. At least in places like Russia and Thailand you’d be fitted up for doing something they didn’t like (in which case you’d stop) and you could pay your way out. In the UK (and US) you get fitted up because your conviction would help somebody’s career slightly and there’s no paying them off.

  10. What we’d now have in an ideal world is a thorough investigation into the extent of penetration of the State, CPS, Plod and Judiciary by Feminists and associated Proggies.

    It is worth bearing in mind that Plod didn’t start this; they have been under constant pressure and institutionally obligated to treat every allegation as true and suspend all rational consideration, get the conviction rate up, and so on. Not least by the media who are now criticising them.

  11. I would like to know who she is so I can send her a tube of KY Jelly to assist her self-ministrations, as clearly she’s not getting much from third parties.

  12. And come to think of it, to be honest when we’re talking about the State, the just obeying orders defence ought to be worth some degree of mitigation, even for Nazis.

  13. Took me less than five minutes to find. My Beautiful Launderette was a great clue, JuliaM. Go to former at imdb and work through actresses with “Waterllo sex assault” in Google.

  14. Philip Scott Thomas

    Ian B,

    Not quite. She has a professional in the nearby market town now, but she still has many good friends in the village, including one who just returned from an extended visit to New Zealand.

  15. The Tele says: “The changes made in the CPS’s version of the video were critical because the case hinged on whether Mr Pearson could have committed the assault in that amount of time – and the CCTV gave the impression the window was twice as long as it was in reality.”

    This is really frightening — the case hinged merely on *whether it was possible he could have committed the assult*. It didn’t rely on eye-witnesses, video footage of him doing it, a motive, or anything like that (because nothing like that existed, all that existed was her claim that someone did it). It hinged merely on whether he had *sufficient time* to have committed a crime for which there was not the slightest evidence that he had committed.

  16. “I still want to know how he was identified.”

    I don’t know for sure, but I just presumed that they looked at the video footage of the time the assault supposedly occurred, worked out that he was the only one who could possibly have done it, traced him, and arrested him.

  17. The whole accusation is pretty weird. There’s not the usual motive you get with false accusations (ie. to get someone specific into trouble). Perhaps she’s going loopy. Or perhaps she was assaulted (by a pickpocket, perhaps, trying to distract her attention from her handbag), but somewhere else, or another time.

    Anyway, rather than put some more innocent men through a year of hell, why don’t we just select one male at random per year who can be sacrificed straight away by crazed feminists in some sort of Wicker Man contraption.

  18. Ian B

    Thanks, found her. Well that’s another sexual fantasy trashed then. Seeing a picture of her and comparing it to the mental image her voice painted for me.

  19. What really worries me is that this is routine practice and they only got caught this time because someone could afford a competent defence.

  20. And the issue of ID becomes more acute – if she didn’t pick him up out of a lineup and didn’t think that was her on the cctv what reason did the police have even for questioning him? Never mind charging him!

  21. JuliaM

    I looked at the Guardian site and could not find any story on this in any of the summaries on the main page, or in the expanded UK section.

  22. “If we had not taken the steps we had, the CCTV would have been presented to the jury at that amended speed.”

    I can see why he didn’t, but imagine if he hadn’t. They’d be up on Perverting the Course of Justice.

  23. It’s utterly fucking shameful. Start with whoever is head of the CPS. Fire them, seizing their pension rights before they go. Then charge the people who actually did it: criminal charges I mean.

  24. Googles tale of country folk plus pretty washing establishment.

    Coo. Is that what she looks like? I pictured her entirely differently on the steam wireless.

  25. How did they make this man a suspect?
    I can imagine that the Oyster computer system could produce a list of men who were probably at Waterloo at roughly the right time. That would be a list of hundreds. How did they pick from that list the one man they made the suspect?

  26. Well, unless they had some other info (which they’re not disclosing), like the guy has a history of similar assaults, then it looks like it’s just because, on the CCTV video, he’s the guy who passed closest to her in that area at that time.

  27. Ian B & Bart. I imagine they looked at the CCTV of where she said it happened and found the bloke nearest to her, followed his movements on CCTV and the exact moment he passed through a particular ticket barrier from that moment it was dead easy.

  28. Having once been inside a Stasi regional HQ the goings on in the UK, where it is increasingly easy to be the random victim of state agression, are prompting ever more frequent flashes of déjà vu.

  29. As Magnusw says, I presume they tracked his movements and matched it to the Oyster card used at the exact moment he went through a barrier (hence the mention of the Oyster card in the reporting).

  30. IanB:

    Having had a thesp career…
    February 8, 2016 at 4:33 pm

    So…sucking on the arts subsidy teat while coming on anti-state libertarian? Even for a while?

  31. The Daily Wail article I saw shows her (well, *someone*) looking back after a vaguely distinctive man passes her. Holding a backpack and a newspaper.

    Traceable, but gawd it’s flimsy. I’m guessing they used her oyster tracks to identify her on cctv as well, so they didn’t have to have her identify herself.

  32. I’m inclined to wonder whether, if a private prosecution is brought against an officer of the CPS for misconduct in public office, the CPS can take over the prosecution and drp it.

  33. ” I imagine they looked at the CCTV of where she said it happened and found the bloke nearest to her, followed his movements on CCTV and the exact moment he passed through a particular ticket barrier from that moment ”

    Yes, all fine, but when she failed to pick him out of the line-up, they’d hit a brick wall surely? Good bit of detective work for sure, but if the victim doesn’t ID the suspect you’ve identified, you don’t have a suspect, you have a random bloke who happened to walk past the alleged victim at some point. Without her IDing him, there’s zero evidence to tie him to her allegations in any way. He could be no more a suspect than any other man who had walked close to her in a very busy public place.

  34. Jim, you’re expecting ID parades to be accurate evidence. They never are, except in movies and TV shows. They help, sometimes, but human memories are crap, so ID parades are just as crap.

  35. any legal folks here? Is what the CPS did pervertng the course of justice, or does that apply only to the peasantry?

    Has anyone spotted one of our elected representatives commenting on this? I haven’t. The Hive Mind appears to have engaged radio silence.

  36. I suppose they merely showed the important part of the video in slow motion, to make it easier to follow. Apparently they left the time stamps on, so no deception was involved.

    At least, that would be the CPS explanation if they were obliged to offer one.

  37. Bloke in North Dorset

    This something about this case that we’re not being told.

    If he’d had a record of sexual offences it’s a pound to a piece of shit that it would have been leaked and that would have been all over the Guardian.

    I suspect it’s something to do with her.

  38. “Yes, all fine, but when she failed to pick him out of the line-up, they’d hit a brick wall surely? Good bit of detective work for sure, but if the victim doesn’t ID the suspect you’ve identified, you don’t have a suspect, you have a random bloke who happened to walk past the alleged victim at some point. Without her IDing him, there’s zero evidence to tie him to her allegations in any way. He could be no more a suspect than any other man who had walked close to her in a very busy public place.”

    Yes, as I said earlier, there seems to be absolutely zero evidence to suppor this case.

  39. So Much For Subtlety

    Rob – “The CPS are now rigging the evidence to get a political conviction. Progressivism, eh?”

    It sure looks like they did with the Stephen Lawrence murder too. Modern Britain is not what it was.

    (Although, you know, may be it is, they are just doing it less competently)

  40. So Much For Subtlety

    I think we have found the person what really done it:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3437646/Liam-Neeson-reveals-s-romantically-involved-incredibly-famous-woman-continues-best-following-death-wife-Natasha-Richardson.html

    If anyone could get in and out in that time …. well, it would be Mr Neeson to be honest. God that film where he is on the plane with a terrorist is dull.

    However I bet if he was placed in the line up the nut job would have picked him.

  41. So Much For Subtlety

    In other news, the mother of the Austrian ten year old says she regrets telling him that migrants need our help.

  42. Yeah, I thought that letting them into the country was going to f*ck our kids in the arse, but I didn’t expect it to happen quite so quickly or literally.

  43. I’m going to go with my earlier theory about a woman whose allure has faded needing the attention, and the police fawning over her due to her semi-celebrity status.

  44. Bart said:
    “I can imagine that the Oyster computer system could produce a list of men who were probably at Waterloo at roughly the right time.”

    A good reason for keeping with the unregistered ones, to avoid being fitted up merely because they can prove you were in the general area.

  45. “I’m going to go with my earlier theory about a woman whose allure has faded needing the attention, and the police fawning over her due to her semi-celebrity status.”

    Hard to tell with this one. Perhaps she’s going a bit ga-ga. And given the incompetence of the the police and CPS it’s entirely possible that she was attacked somewhere, but they’ve got the wrong place and/or time.

  46. They’ve just introduced transit cards in Vancouver and unfortunately you can only see transaction history if you register it.
    No transaction history makes claiming tax credit for using transit tricky and the damn thing (millions over and years late) has so far managed to overcharge me about 20% of the time which is tricky to prove without a transaction history. Having spoken to others while anecdotal the overcharging seems to becoming an issue.

  47. No deception was involved? I don’t see that as the appropriate test. The appropriate test is twofold. First, was there a reasonable prospect of conviction, given the full scope of the video in the possession of the CPS? Second, did the CPS disclose this additional material (which it must do, if it assists D)?

  48. I presume they tracked his movements and matched it to the Oyster card used at the exact moment he went through a barrier (hence the mention of the Oyster card in the reporting).

    Pretty much, which is why I have an unregistered Oyster card for my occasional trips to London (usually to get to Heathrow) and only ever top it up using cash.

    After all, who really wants to be caught up in a police investigation when they go on a fishing trip because some lonely dried up Z-list Sleb feels she needs a little attention so makes up some bullshit accusation to ruin some guys life.

    It may not happen everyday, but it happens often enough to take reasonable precautions against this sought of bullshit.

  49. Pretty much, which is why I have an unregistered Oyster card for my occasional trips to London (usually to get to Heathrow) and only ever top it up using cash.

    And as I said on the other thread, we were assured when the Oyster card came in that civil liberties would not be an issue because the card would only be used to facilitate travel.

  50. Btw, the lawyer’s stock phrase is, you don’t know what’s really happened unless you’ve heard all the evidence. Like it or not, it is noteworthy that the jury still took 90 minutes to acquit. The swiftest acquittal I’ve ever known was six minutes.

  51. Btw, the lawyer’s stock phrase is, you don’t know what’s really happened unless you’ve heard all the evidence. Like it or not, it is noteworthy that the jury still took 90 minutes to acquit. The swiftest acquittal I’ve ever known was six minutes.

    But we don’t know, indeed can never really know what deliberations went on in the jury room can we?

    All it takes is one juror to come the old “no smoke without fire” bullshit and you’re there a while. While those who comment in this place tend to be a pretty cynical bunch there are still a lot of conservatives out there who trust the police and judicial services such as the UK’s Crown Prosecution Service and don’t realise how politicized and out of touch they are.

    So no, taking 90-minutes to come to a verdict even in these circumstances doesn’t surprise me.

  52. I’m mildly surprised that the judge didn’t just throw it out and tear a strip off the prosecution. He Knows What’s Good For Him?

  53. So Much For Subtlety

    If she is going to star in The Game of Thrones, I can foresee some problems.

    “I was raped officer. He was large, green and scaly”

    “I was raped officer. By a mildly Gay eunuch and a very short drunk”

    “I was raped officer. By the Queen and her slightly less deranged brother”

    “I was raped officer. By an albino direwolf possessed by the spirit of Jon Snow”

    You hardly know where to start. But let’s look on the bright side, perhaps it is method acting – preparation for her new role. After all, how many female characters in the painfully politically correct George R. R. Martin’s world *haven’t* been raped?

  54. I’m mildly surprised that the judge didn’t just throw it out and tear a strip off the prosecution. He Knows What’s Good For Him?

    Because the judiciary are as corrupted by the same mentality as the CPS and know which side their bread and more importantly their judicial pensions are buttered.

    Making an example of the CPS is not a good career move for a judge.

  55. Like it or not, it is noteworthy that the jury still took 90 minutes to acquit. The swiftest acquittal I’ve ever known was six minutes.

    Without giving away too much of what was discussed in the jury room, the one time I’ve done jury service the accused was obviously guilty as sin but we still took 30+ minutes to make sure we were all happy we’d reached the correct decision. Maybe decisions to convict tend to take longer for that reason?

    And besides, if the jury had come straight back in again then the usual suspects would be jumping up and down screeching about a mistrial.

  56. @SBML: I know ID parades aren’t that accurate. But without an ID from the victim there was ZERO evidence that this particular man did anything other than walk past the ‘victim’. Why this man and not any of the multiple others she passed in a very busy station?

  57. While those who comment in this place tend to be a pretty cynical bunch there are still a lot of conservatives out there who trust the police and judicial services such as the UK’s Crown Prosecution Service and don’t realise how politicized and out of touch they are.

    There’s a lot of SJWs who do as well, provided the police and CPS are reinforcing the narrative.

  58. The Tele says: “The changes made in the CPS’s version of the video were critical because the case hinged on whether Mr Pearson could have committed the assault in that amount of time – and the CCTV gave the impression the window was twice as long as it was in reality.”

    If Kafka was still alive, he’d be making documentaries.

  59. There’s a lot of SJWs who do as well, provided the police and CPS are reinforcing the narrative.

    The notional Left and Right are pretty similar in this regard; they support the authorities when the authorities are seen to be agreeing with them, rant against them when not. Greenies attacked scientists until suddenly “the Science” was beyond doubt because it supported Global Warming.

    Likewise crusty conservatives and the BBC, etc, who only went off it when they decided it had stopped promoting conservative values.

  60. The notional Left and Right are pretty similar in this regard; they support the authorities when the authorities are seen to be agreeing with them, rant against them when not.

    Indeed, there is barely a principle to be seen among the whole lot of them. Most complaints about something are more often than not complaints that the wrong people are doing something, or something is being done to the wrong people, not that the thing itself in principle is wrong.

  61. I disagree that it would be a bad career move for a judge to tear a strip off the CPS. It in fact happens all the time, which in turn tells you all you need to know about the impunity of the CPS.

    Plus there is in fact a mechanism – the so-called ‘submission of no case to answer’ – which enables a judge to kick the prosecution out at the close of the Crown’s case. The judge can do this of his own motion, or on the application of defence counsel. If there is literally no evidence (which is vanishingly unusual), it’s a no-brainer: the case is kicked-out.

    The more I think about this, the more it sounds like there was some evidence.

    None of which is intended to detract from the overall thrust of comments about the awfulness of the CPS, and some of the reasons for it. Like everyone else, I am mystified why someone thought it would be a good idea to redact the video in this way and it would not at all surprise me to hear that, once it became clear to prosecuting counsel that the missing video was as enlightening as is apparently the case, he then had a ‘difficult’ conversation with his instructing CPS dimwit who instructed him to plough on regardless.

  62. Plus there is in fact a mechanism – the so-called ‘submission of no case to answer’ – which enables a judge to kick the prosecution out at the close of the Crown’s case. The judge can do this of his own motion, or on the application of defence counsel. If there is literally no evidence (which is vanishingly unusual), it’s a no-brainer: the case is kicked-out.

    I heard about one of these recently, but I’ll be damned if I can remember what it was. Quite high profile IIRC.

  63. So Much For Subtlety

    Tim Newman – “And as I said on the other thread, we were assured when the Oyster card came in that civil liberties would not be an issue because the card would only be used to facilitate travel.”

    In “Hoisted with their own petard” news:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3438339/Met-police-riot-squad-disbanded-officers-fiddled-overtime.html

    A source told the newspaper: ‘Details from the Oyster cards are electronically stored and apparently showed officers were on their way home while claiming overtime for being at work.

    ‘There was concern about a particular team and discrepancies in their overtime claims. That led to investigations into other teams. It’s an embarrassment to the force.’

  64. So Much For Subtlety

    And as I keep banging on about, we are in the process of centralizing all medical records. If this is what they do with your Oyster Card, what will they do when they can read your medical records?

  65. Tim N, submissions of no case to answer – called in the trade ‘half-time’ submissions – are very common. But it is very unusual for them to be made on the basis of there being no evidence, or at least no evidence of a vital ingredient of the offence charged. More common by far is that a half-time submission is made on the grounds that the evidence is contradictory, tenuous, or some such. Half-time submissions made on this basis are almost two-a-penny, and the stock in-trade of defence advocates.

  66. Henry Crun

    Re the BBC audio, obviously we’re only listening to one side, but I’m struggling to understand how the CPS can in any way be regarded as fit for purpose after listening to that? 100% incompetent – or is it actually worse than that?

  67. “I’m struggling to understand how the CPS can in any way be regarded as fit for purpose after listening to that? 100% incompetent – or is it actually worse than that?”

    In my view its quite easy to see what happened – the CPS receive this case, the victim is a famous(ish), non-white woman. Regardless of the evidence, they know that if they throw this out, all hell is going to break loose. They know what their mates in the BBC and the Guardian etc will do with the ‘facts’ – ‘Famous actress sexually assaulted in broad daylight and the CPS are calling her a liar and refusing to prosecute!!!!’. It could easily (from their perspective) have turned into another Stephen Lawrence type cause celebre. So they decided the best course of action was an arse saving one. Prosecute the guy regardless of the facts, the fallout if the case is thrown out/he is acquitted will have less impact on their careers than if they refuse to prosecute in the first place.

    The threw the defendant under the bus, to save their own careers.

  68. JIm

    Interesting, which one can only really interpret as “worse than that” – what you are describing is wilful dishonesty or corruption?

  69. On the previous post about this Eddy described the CPS decision making process as they will go ahead with a prosecution if they think the chances are 50:50.

    I know this isn’t what Eddy meant but it made me think the CPS just toss a coin.

    Based on this 2008 BBC webpage it appear to be a mix of having a 50:50 chance of success and being in the public interest. Given the evidence disclosed so far I cannot see the prosecution having been in the public interest. I’ll stick with my coin toss theory.

  70. Given the evidence disclosed so far I cannot see the prosecution having been in the public interest.

    I’ve come to the conclusion that what is in the public interest as far as the Crown Prosecution Service under both Keir Starmer and more radically under Alison Saunders is concerned is far from what the “man on the Clapham omnibus” would describe as the public interest.

    Personally, I would describe the “public interest” being pursued by the CPS as being largely about attempting to turn radical feminist doctrine on “rape culture” into a reality by turning a blind eye to false accusations by women and persecuting men vindictively and probably even vexatiously purely for media headlines.

    Justice is not being served here, it is an exercise in arbitrary prosecution without reasonable possibility of redress.

    Alison Saunders should be fired and the CPS gutted to remove bias.

  71. What Jim and John Galt said.

    Plod are caught between multiple stools. Meanwhile, still the focus fails to fall on the ideological extremists who have engineered this situation.

  72. Don’t forget the De Freitas case would still be fresh in the CPS’s collective memory. That happened in 2013/14, this one in early 2015. The CPS got it in the neck from the usual suspects for ‘not believing the rape victim’ in that one despite there being no more evidence of the allegations in that case than this. So when this one hit the CPS in tray, arseholes suddenly tightened up.

    Also note the somewhat different CPS approach in this case:

    http://www.wimbledonguardian.co.uk/news/14233033.Case_dropped__Two_16_year_olds_face_no_further_action_over_charges_of_multiple_rapes__knife_possession_and_assault/

    (H/T JuliaM)

  73. “Why this man and not any of the multiple others she passed in a very busy station?”

    One hopes it was because she could define the precise spot where it happened and the video shows he was the one and only man who passed here exactly at that spot.

    One fears it might be because this man used a registered Oyster card that could be traced, whereas other men in the same crowd went on and used anonymous Oyster cards.

  74. One fears it might be because this man used a registered Oyster card that could be traced, whereas other men in the same crowd went on and used anonymous Oyster cards.

    …and there but for the grace of god and my anonymous Oyster card go I.

    Up Next: Metropolitan Police demand all Oyster cards be registered to reduce mass outbreak of sexual hysteria among 60-year old BEM women actresses.

  75. @Bart:”One hopes it was because she could define the precise spot where it happened and the video shows he was the one and only man who passed here exactly at that spot.”

    Fair enough. But they then put said man in a line up and she fails to pick him out. Not only that, they never show her the footage to confirm if this is the actual spot it all happened, and the man shown in the footage was her assailant. We don’t even know that the victim agrees that the man shown in the footage was her alleged assailant. She never saw the footage until the trial, and then failed to recognise herself, let alone any assailant.

    The whole thing is insane from start to finish.

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