To tell the truth is a revolutionary act

Mr Cameron suggested that Mr Johnson made his decision simply in order to further his own ambition to become prime minister.

Well, obviously. Who ever thought differently?

Who thought differently about Dave and hug a husky? Or anything else he’s ever done? Or any other politician for that matter?

11 thoughts on “To tell the truth is a revolutionary act”

  1. Jeremy Corbyn…?

    Pretty sure he didn’t make decisions simply in order to further his own ambition to become prime minister.

    He never thought he had any chance of making it – and many more like him. A good constituency MP. A fair amount of them about with no delusions of grandeur.

    This is not a recommendation of Corbyn.

  2. A man who says he’s the best man to run the country may be lying, mistaken or right.
    In all cases his logical course of action is to promote himself. We can’t therefore sort them by whether they self promote.

  3. So Much For Subtlety

    Ljh – “Boris’ advantages are that he is occassionally entertaining and has never done touchyfeely photo-ops.”

    I have seen him on his bike too often for some of them not to be touchyfeely photo ops. Boris’ big advantage is that he is a serial shagger. Which suggests he doesn’t give a flying f&&k about political correctness or feminism. He is not a self loathing male.

    As much as I dislike the c*nt, if he takes a page from Trump’s book and tells the metropolitan media to suck his membrum virile I would vote for him and anyone associated with him.

  4. When younger Cameron was open with friends about his desire to become PM. For reasons of personal glory only, not ideology (and yes, there are left-wingers who go into politics for ideological reasons, but they’re even scarier).

  5. I’m not convinced that supporting Brexit is an ideal career move. The bookies are still odds-on ‘remain’, and a loser is never a popular candidate. A lot could change between now and June, it’s true, but the ‘leavers’ need to get their act together in reasonably short order.

    I suppose you could argue he’s just doing it to distinguish himself from Osborne and May, and there’s considerable support for the ‘out’ position among Tory MPs; but perhaps he genuinely believes in his position (first time for everything).

  6. So Much For Subtlety

    Chris Miller – “I’m not convinced that supporting Brexit is an ideal career move. The bookies are still odds-on ‘remain’, and a loser is never a popular candidate.”

    Boris doesn’t need to win with all British people. Just with Tory voters. And with condemnation from “Dave” and from Russell Brand, well, I am coming around to the sh!t myself:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3458309/Boris-Johnson-Jihadi-John-machine-Russell-Brand-posts-crack-pot-Facebook-rant-saying-Tory-Mayor-London-helping-grow-thousands-new-British-terrorists.html

    Remember children, when it comes to drugs, just say no.

  7. Tory is generally spelt t-r-e-a-c-h-e-r-y and in the case of Johnson he will have an eye on the wind.

    My guess is he will turn his coat on the eve of the vote.

  8. NPR(“Liberal Media Warning) seems to have a very positive view of Boris calling him “the most charismatic politician on both of the Conservative and Labour parties inside the House of Commons.” Even I know when NPR* supports you, as a politician, you are in trouble.

    *I understand it was the “guest” that made the comment but NPR very rarely has “guests” that don’t fit the narrative.

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