These people aren’t just mad they’re fascists

There has been a “shocking” rise in the salt content of food and seemingly healthy soups contain more than a portion of takeaway pizza, a study has found.
Despite dozens of firms signing up to a voluntary deal to cut salt levels, health campaigners say too many everyday foods still contain too much salt with major brands at fault.
Research from the Consensus Action on Salt and Health (Cash) found that products such as tinned tomato soup, cheddar cheese and chilled ready meals are among the worst offenders for increasing salt in recent years.

Salt. In cheese. Yep, they’re complaining about that.

Salt acts as preservative and flavour enhancer in cheese. In addition, salt has a main role in the functional properties of the cheese. Accordingly, there is a challenge in reducing salt without affecting the cheese quality. The reduction of salt was achieved through the decrease of its content used and replacement by potassium chloride. In natural cheese, these approaches adversely affected the cheese properties, particularly the characteristic flavour.

Yep, salt, in cheese:

Salt is an essential ingredient in cheese making. This article is about salt’s function in cheese making, primarily: Moisture control, rind formation, control of production of lactic acid, texture improver, microbiological control, and flavour enhancer.

They’re complaining. And their solution?

“It’s imperative that responsibility for nutrition be handed back to an independent agency where it is not affected by changes in government, ministers, political lobbying and pressure from the food industry.”
Sonia Pombo, nutritionist and campaign manager for Cash, said: “Whilst many food manufacturers initially made a concerted effort to reduce the salt in their products, others are now failing to do so and, in turn, are putting the nation’s health at risk.
“To do this, an agency independent of political control and not run by the food industry needs to set regulated targets for salt, saturated fat and sugar to give the food industry a level playing field.”

To translate that. Give us all lovely highly paid jobs in the bureaucracy, the bureaucracy which we control, which no politician nor anyone else can touch, so that we can be the sole and inviolable controllers of what people eat.

Or, you know, that fascism of being ruled by an entirely unaccountable bureaucracy.

Not sure even the Carthage option is enough to deal with these fuckers.

41 thoughts on “These people aren’t just mad they’re fascists”

  1. “an agency independent of political control and not run by the food industry”

    As you say, translated means an agency run by them.

    Cut their funding to zero.

  2. Consensus Action on Salt and Health? As in CASH.

    I see Alann B*stard is up to his old tricks again

  3. You are so right. Fuckem. I will drink, eat and smoke as much as I like. I left school a long time ago and do not need these nursery school teachers running around telling me what I can and cannot consume.

  4. Bloke in North Dorset

    LE

    I haven’t read the article so I’m guessing they’re referring to low fat cheese. As my wife explains it to me, they need to find a way to enhance flavour when they reduce fat so they increase the salt level.

    I don’t like the taste of salt so don’t tend to add much to cooking. Normally this isn’t a problem but occasionally I get an urge for it, at which point I reach for the cheese box.

    Soon all we’ll be eating is some tasteless mush.

  5. So Much For Subtlety

    Yet again it is worth pointing out that there is no strong evidence that higher levels of salt are bad for you. We did, after all, evolve with it.

    replacement by potassium chloride

    We also evolved with potassium chloride. But not so much. Does anyone seriously think that replacing one metal halide salt with another rarer metal halide salt is going to do anything useful for our health?

    It may well do something rather bad. After all, can anyone else spot the cause for concern in this sentence:

    KCl is used in medicine, scientific applications, food processing, and used to cause cardiac arrest as the third drug in the “three drug cocktail” for executions by lethal injection.

    Anyone?

  6. Salt is essential for health, and the US CDC recently concluded low-salt diets were causing far more diseases in total than the cardio vascular diseases they were targeting. Cue outrage from various CVD ‘charities’. There isn’t a correct level of salt in the diet, how much you need depends on how much you excrete via kidneys/sweating. It is the exact opposite of statins, which are now demonstrably reducing life expectancy in the target groups, even though CVD kills less of them.

    I steer well clear of docs and nutritionists, they can grasp neither logic nor science, a dangerous combination for people supposedly charged with improving health outcomes.

    Last year I visited the doc because I needed to get a vaccination, he commented I was a rare visitor in the surgery. I commented that it was because I was generally healthier when I didn’t see doctors than when I did. Completely went over his head

  7. I used to work at a Stilton factory about 12 years ago. They experimented with a low salt recipe for white stilton which failed miserably. The cheese started to go brown after just a few days during the maturation process.

    Clearly the people perpetuating the low/no salt dogma are morons.

  8. SMFS-

    You don’t understand. Salt makes food more pleasurable to eat. Pleasure is harmful. Big Food (including apparently Big Cheese) put pleasure-inducing drugs like salt in their food to seduce us, like paedophiles grooming children. If we don’t ban paedofood now, society will collapse. Anyone who supports paedofood is evil. Do you support grooming innocent children with paedofood? You monster!

  9. See, I actually am concerned about salt levels in various processed foods. And can see an argument that “something must be done” because consumer choice is a weak tool if consumers are not well informed (and the school system doesn’t do a terribly good at that).

    I appreciate that consumers have access to nutritional information on sides of packets but even if they read it, a lot of people are “number blind” or have no sense of numerical scale and proportion (this isn’t just limited to journalists, though I did see a newspaper headline about the NHS having a £40 BILLION TRANSLATION BILL annually, which amused me) and to make full use of those nutritional information sheets you need either a calculator or moderately sharp mental arithmetic skills. And preferably a set of scales, a food diary and a spreadsheet.

    I wish companies would get on and do something about it (I understand some attempts have been made, but it’s a gradual process because of technical difficulties making the recipe work still, and to stop people noticing a sudden change in taste) and don’t think it would be grossly unfair if an elected, ergo diselectable, government gave an appropriate kick up the backside.

    For all that, I read “an agency independent of political control and not run by the food industry” and my blood boiled. Good grief.

    “Please appoint me FOOD DICTATOR FOR LIFE! I promise I’ll be benign…”

    Awfully, woefully naive of them to think politicians somehow couldn’t/wouldn’t meddle. It’s the ones who agree with their core argument who’d most likely interfere the most, I suggest, because they’re folks who’d think they should be running the show instead.

  10. Ah, “processed” foods.

    So, only raw, unprepared foods are good for you. Down with recipes! What the fuck are we allowed to eat once you’ve banned processing foods? Raw fruit?

    No, too much sugar in that. Mother nature, what a bitch.

  11. By the way, everyone is aware that the balance oi potassium and sodium ions is what change the cell potentials in nerves, so you can’t actually replace one with the other in that regard, right?

  12. So Much For Subtlety

    RobW – “Potassium: Didn’t someone OD on this from eating too many bananas? Must they now be banned?”

    Well we could change the standard TW measure of radiation from a banana to a cheddar.

    It is slightly easier to OD on potassium chloride than on sodium chloride.

    Orally, potassium chloride is toxic in excess; the LD50 is around 2.5 g/kg (meaning that a lethal dose for 50% of people weighing 75 kg (165 lb) is about 190 g (6.7 ounces)). The oral toxicity of sodium chloride (table salt) is about the same, 3.75 g/kg.

    About the same? OK. If they say so. I would like to see someone eat 200 grams of KCL. Presumably the only real risk is to infants.

  13. SMFS

    I only read the headline on the banana OD story because it was obvious bollocks. Eat/drink very large quantities of anything and you will screw up so many physiological processes, that death is a possibility, long before there is a toxicity risk in many cases.

  14. This is all such utter shite – but I think we are wasting our time getting het up about it. It changes nothing and raises our blood pressure unnecessarily (when we could be doing it much more enjoyably by eating a salt sandwich, or perhaps some deep fried salt washed down with some chateau Salt).

    Very few people take much notice of this cuntishness (unfortunately my parents seem to despite my efforts but that is because they are from a generation which mistakenly believe that the government really cares about them) but most people nowadays are grown up enough to see this shit for what it is.

    Unfortunately people are not yet stroppy enough about paying these cunts’ wages. But that will come.

  15. Classic Progressive/Marxist behaviour:

    1. Demand overarching, ‘independent’ single body in charge.
    2. Infiltrate and dominate said body.

    Job done, control of the food supply.

    Rinse and repeat: education (already done), health (already done).

    The only way to beat these people is to have no authority, or authority delegated to the smallest possible unit. There aren’t enough loony marxists to infiltrate and dominate ten thousand independent schools, for example. They would have to fight ten thousand individual battles. But a National Curriculum, run by a single government department? One battle, aided by their friends already on the inside who are happy to open the castle gates for them.

  16. “Very few people take much notice of this cuntishness”

    Sadly I disagree. Media hysteria campaigns, with daily bulletins, work.

  17. So Much For Subtlety

    RobW – “I only read the headline on the banana OD story because it was obvious bollocks. Eat/drink very large quantities of anything and you will screw up so many physiological processes, that death is a possibility, long before there is a toxicity risk in many cases.”

    I think it would take a while to die of a banana overdose. They contain, according to a quick google, 358 mg of potassium per 100 g. Assuming that is all KCL. So that would be what? 60 kilograms of bananas? Without excreting any in the meantime.

    Even if you fried them and dipped them in chocolate I don’t think someone could eat a tenth of that.

    You are right – obvious b0ll0cks.

  18. Ian B

    It would be stupid to argue “natural food is good for you”, on some automatic basis, or that “processed food is bad”.

    But clearly pre-processed food removes a lot of control from the consumer. Yes, removes time and effort and fuss too, but it does mean you don’t have such a say on what inputs you’re getting other than the consume/don’t consume dichotomy. If you make your own soup you can control how much salt you put in. If you buy soup in tins, consumer choice is limited – pretty much all the brands have large quantities of salt.

    Perhaps there are technical reasons it has to be that way. If the reasons are more commercial than technical then it would be nice if the options available were a little healthier.

  19. 60 kilograms of bananas? Without excreting any in the meantime.

    That’s probably the hardest part. What are you going to do, use a cork?

    ISTR a recent example of someone swallowing contraband, and the response was to lock him in a room with a bucket, and a large pile of bananas.

  20. MyBurningEars, have you tasted Heinz soup or baked beans recently? They have obviously reduced the salt and/or sugar content. Both products are now just bland slop.

  21. “statins, which are now demonstrably reducing life expectancy in the target groups”: yeah, but they make life feel longer, what with the muddle and the pains.

  22. Food processors aren’t going to put more salt in than is necessary for the simple reason that salt costs money, unless the use of salt means that they use less of a more expensive ingredient. Economics innit?

  23. Food processors aren’t going to put more salt in than is necessary for the simple reason that salt costs money, unless the use of salt means that they use less of a more expensive ingredient.

    That’s exactly the point. In many cheap processed foods, the salt compensates for the lack of flavour in the other very cheap ingredients. They aren’t adding Maldon Sea Salt, Lakeland’s “Salt for Everything” (or even Jamie Punchable-Face’s Himalayan Pink Salt) here – they’re adding the same quality of stuff that they spread on the roads (hopefully minus the grit!)

    In some processed foods, salt is essential (cheese is just processed milk!) In others, a level of salt makes it palatable.

    In the human diet, some salt is essential. Too much salt – as noted above, too much of anything – can eff you up in different ways.

    Therefore, 3 grams per day should become the long-term target for population salt intake.

    I suspect I’ve on more than one day eaten more than that straight out of the jar (of Maldon Sea Salt).

  24. @SJW from your link

    Our pooled analysis of randomised trials of 4 weeks or more in duration shows that such a reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure both in individuals with raised blood pressure and in those with normal blood pressure. AND

    Thirty-four trials (3230 participants) were included.

    4 weeks or more, wow, that’s really convinced me that I need to change for the REST of my life. Can we guarantee that the 34 trials were all run with the same degree of rigour, if not combining them is a meaningless exercise. Then there is publication bias.

    So with the minimum of respect, go forth and multiply.

  25. SE-

    There isn’t a “quality” of salt. It’s a genuinely homogenous product, consisting of a single chemical, sodium chloride. There isn’t good salt and bad salt, artisanal salt and organic salt. There’s just salt. Salt is salt.

  26. “There’s just salt. Salt is salt.” Yet a jam-maker will tell you that sugar isn’t sugar. That’s because stuff often has traces of other stuff in it.

  27. There’s cheap salt from Tesco and expensive salt from Waitrose. There’s two types, right there.

  28. But surely as long as you use organic sea salt then it is acceptable to use as much as you like!

  29. @ SE . maldon sea salt is better in some important way? Serious question. Happy to pay more if it matters but I thought salt was salt was salt. No?

  30. But surely as long as you use organic sea salt then it is acceptable to use as much as you like!

    Organic sea salt will be exempt from regulation. A willing university department will produce a report for money to prove it is beneficial to health.

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