Bollixy bollixy bollocks, eh?

The true effect from Chernobyl may not be known for decades.

The blast immediately killed one person. A second died in the hospital after succumbing to injuries. While the reactor burned for two weeks, discharging the largest-ever uncontrolled amount of radioactive material into the environment,

Compared with other nuclear events: The Chernobyl explosion put 400 times more radioactive material into the Earth’s atmosphere than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima; atomic weapons tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s all together are estimated to have put some 100 to 1,000 times more radioactive material into the atmosphere than the Chernobyl accident.” :This article is written in page 8(9) of “Ten years after Chernobyl:What do we really know? “of the PDF official document

And I don’t think that claiming an atomic bomb as being “controlled release” is going to work, do you?

10 thoughts on “Bollixy bollixy bollocks, eh?”

  1. I suppose if you’ve determined the amount, location and timing you can be said to be in control, n’est pas?

  2. Chernobyl, an area the size of Rhode Island, will not be radiation-free, if ever, for at least 24,000 years.

    Nothing, anywhere, is “radiation-free”. From black holes and neutron stars to a bucket of water, there is detectable radiation.

  3. So Much For Subtlety

    Depends on what you mean by controlled. Castle Bravo turned out to be a lot bigger than they were expecting. Irradiating some harmless Japanese fishermen. But it did go off when it was supposed to and in the place it was supposed to. So that was pretty controlled.

    On the other hand Plumbbob was a series of tests several of which did not go off or did not go off properly. Diablo had to be set off again after the first attempt failed. Lassen failed totally. Franklin, Newton and Charleston fizzled. Although Plumbbob is more famous for Pascal-B which may or may not have propelled a steel plate into space.

  4. Whatever Wikipedians may say, Pascal-B definitely did not propel the steel plate out of the atmosphere.

    http://nuclearweaponarchive.org/Usa/Tests/Brownlee.html

    The escape-velocity quote comes from an anecdote, not from actual data. In any case, the cover is thought to have burned in the atmosphere – compare the friction generated by multiples of escape velocity in thick air at sea level (or close) to the friction generated by re-entry (at much the same speed as escape velocity, natch) into the far, far thinner upper atmosphere.

  5. If you use explosive in the demolition of a building you do some serious calculations beforehand. You then end up with a controlled blast. The same type of calculations can be done for an atomic explosion.

  6. And there’s bound to be an ‘oops’ or two the first couple of times you try out the calculations.

  7. “And I don’t think that claiming an atomic bomb as being “controlled release” is going to work, do you?”

    Did it go off by accident?

  8. So Much For Subtlety

    Dave – “Whatever Wikipedians may say, Pascal-B definitely did not propel the steel plate out of the atmosphere.”

    Yeah. Just proves they hate Jews, right? I am not sure but I think Wikipedia probably doesn’t claim it did.

    “The escape-velocity quote comes from an anecdote, not from actual data.”

    It comes from the film footage of the test. One frame of which captured the cover in motion. It is pretty sketchy data, but data it is.

    “In any case, the cover is thought to have burned in the atmosphere – compare the friction generated by multiples of escape velocity in thick air at sea level (or close) to the friction generated by re-entry (at much the same speed as escape velocity, natch) into the far, far thinner upper atmosphere.”

    The cover being a big, heavy, flat metal object. Not the sure of thing that would be expected to survive flying through the atmosphere at escape velocity.

    However notice that you have no data to back that up. Just anecdote.

  9. “And I don’t think that claiming an atomic bomb as being “controlled release” is going to work, do you?”

    I know what you’re trying to say but yes, an atomic bomb is a controlled release of radioactive material. At fist glance it may seem counter-intuitive but the amount of material and energy that will be released is known and controlled.

    Chernobyl, by contrast, was a completely uncontrolled release – there could have been anywhere from none to the full contents of the reactors with no one able to control the amount at all.

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