My word, what a surprise!

Research among 200 employers by the firm My Family Care found that more than four out of 10 had not seen a single male employee take up the right. At 11%, only between 0.5% and 1% of male workers had taken shared parental leave and fewer than 10% reported more than 1% takeup. A further quarter of firms were not able to give a figure.

With statutory pay set at a maximum of £139.58 a week, 80% of employees surveyed said a decision to share leave would depend on finances and whether their employer paid more than obliged to.

The research found that concerns over career progression were a factor for many, with half of men saying they thought taking leave was perceived negatively at work and 55% of mothers questioned said they did not want to share their leave.

You might almost think that this sort of thing is hardwired in. Mammies want to take care of the babbies and daddies want to provide for them.

And yes, as the original instigator of the shared parental leave law in the UK I do indeed get to say that.

16 thoughts on “My word, what a surprise!”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    You might almost think that this sort of thing is hardwired in.

    You might. But then you might suggest women don’t belong in the military and get flamed for it.

    In the West, we expect men to work themselves to an early death so that their wives can shop. This is a p!ss poor arrangement for the men, but society as a whole seems to benefit so I wouldn’t complain.[1] Naturally the next step is to make it compulsory for men to take an equal amount of paternal leave.

    [1] Unlike Africa where people expect women to work, men to do nothing much and no one to be sure of who their father is. The fact the welfare state has enabled this African lifestyle to be recreated in the West clearly has nothing to do with genes.

  2. Dad took two weeks leave when each of his children were born. During one he installed central heating upstairs and during the other he installed it downstairs (between helping out mum). After that he went back to work to ensure that his family were provided for and neither of them would have had it any other way.

  3. Naturally the next step is to make it compulsory for men to take an equal amount of paternal leave.

    Of course, because giving people choice is not enough, they must be forced to do what is best for them.

  4. They don’t just believe its best for them, they know it’s best for them. Cos they know whats best for everyone.

  5. I took my 2 weeks paid paternity leave. I had a right to an extremely generous amount of unpaid leave (6 months per kid, can be taken up to their 12th birthday if I remember rightly).

    Didn’t take a single day of it.

  6. So Much For Subtlety

    abacab – “Didn’t take a single day of it.”

    You, sir, are worse than Hitler. Have you no shame? Clearly all the problems women have in modern Britain are your fault.

    We have a system where women do work they generally like for indifferent, or even no, levels of pay, while their husbands earn lots of money to enable their wives to buy what they like. The only people who are not happy with this arrangement are a small number of embittered lesbians. Why are we listening to them?

  7. “And yes, as the original instigator of the shared parental leave law in the UK I do indeed get to say that.”

    To which one might imagine a response from a shed somewhere in Norfolk:

    Reply
    Richard Murphy says:
    April 3 2016 at 11:28 pm
    Stewart

    He looks like he is borrowed a great deal from me

  8. Looking after babies is shift-work. Having both parents around at the same time all of the time is over-manning, and could lead to all sorts of domestic disputes.

    No amount of government tinkerage is going to make it easy.

  9. So Much For Subtlety

    Jack C – “Having both parents around at the same time all of the time is over-manning, and could lead to all sorts of domestic disputes.”

    Well there is a simple solution – send her back out to work.

    I don’t want to join the economy
    I don’t want to go to work
    I’d rather hang around Piccadilly Underground
    Living of the earnings of a high class lady
    I don’t want my mananger on my ar$e
    I don’t want me bollocks shot away
    I’d rather be in England
    Merry merry England
    And fornicate my f*ckin’ life away

  10. We might suspect that women of childbearing age are discriminated against in hiring and in the workplace, for fear that they’ll vanish for a year. One way to level this playing field slightly is to force men to also take 6-12 months off.

    Sledgehammer to crack a nut, of course; but it might work. As a consequence, beta males would become much more employable.

  11. I remember when they firs brought in right to paid leave, there were 3 of us in work with wives expecting at the time, none of us took the option. The reason was that the conditions for taking the leave and loss of earnings meant it was totally impractical and you were better off just taking vacation days.
    As another poster mentioned having someone come home who you can hand over the childcare to also makes more sense than both being home.
    The other issue is the breakdown of family support where grandparents used to step in to help out, still happens, but not as much as it used to.

  12. When the twins were born I took a couple of weeks of paternity leave – SWMBO needed to recover from a c-section and is a frail beast at the best of times.

    I think one week of it was paid and then I had entitlements to dip my hands into my neighbours’ pockets for a few more weeks – but took the second week as leave on principle (my choice to have kids – not my neighbours!).

    Following the birth SWMBO stayed at home to bring the kids up and I changed jobs to something that paid me more but meant longer hours etc – it was unspoken but seemed natural for me to go and provide and her to bring the critters up.

    As it is the whole thing made sense for us – she’s a morning and day person who pretty much collapses from exhaustion at about 7pm; and I get home from work at about 7pm and don’t really need more than a few hours sleep. So we could work through this on shift work with me responsible from 7pm to 2am and then making sure I get a solid 4 hours; and her responsible from 2am to 7pm.

  13. I’m happy to say since the wife and baby arrived here I haven’t been staying late at work as predicted by Steve; I’ve been stopping off at the pub on the way home instead.

  14. Bloke in Costa Rica

    The two consecutive days off I take a week is probably too long. It takes me most of Sunday (my first work day of the week) to catch up. Even when I’m nominally off I’m doing code reviews and keeping in touch with developer chats via Skype. Six months off and I might as well jack it in and do something else. Especially if it was for twenty quid a day. Who lives on that these days outside Angola?

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