Religious bodies in Kerala are doing away with displays of fireworks during temple festivals

Sounds sensible:

in the wake of the fire tragedy that killed more than 100 people at the Puttingal temple in Kollam district on Sunday.

10 thoughts on “Religious bodies in Kerala are doing away with displays of fireworks during temple festivals”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    No it doesn’t. It is just a knee-jerk reaction because they want to be seen doing something.

    Some times, most of the time perhaps, the best response is to do nothing. People want fireworks at festivals – and they are not exactly part of the Hindu tradition – then they should be allowed to have them. The most this calls for is more health and safety training. Maybe some regulations about storage.

  2. I remember Mrs Gandhi’s funeral on telly (I was Sikh as a parrot about it all I remember).

    Regardless of the politics such an occasion would have been conducted in the West with some dignity, gravitas and precision in the course of events.

    In India it was a shambolic mess with random people wandering about all over and a scruffy, aimless air about it. (This was before the rise in the West of ego-boosted political dross like Pig-Fuck and O’bumma who giggle and take selfies at funerals).

    This type of “so what” disorder (probably born of fatalism) is likely a part of the firework tragedy. So –rather than cure bad attitudes ( which is slowly happening in India) fireworks are to be banned? After probably centuries of tradition?

  3. So Much For Subtlety

    Mr Ecks – “fireworks are to be banned? After probably centuries of tradition?”

    Hey, it beats paying policemen properly and giving them a real pension. After all it is not as if the law is going to be enforced or anything is it? The Muslim world tends to ban people firing their guns at weddings. Which is why it never ever, ever happens.

  4. If you read the article, no-one is banning anything or suggesting a ban. The temples involved have merely decided that maybe it all got a bit out of hand and it might be best to lay off for a while.

    Bearing in mind that one of them laid in 50 tonnes (!!) of gunpowder for the event I think it’s fair to say common sense has prevailed.

  5. The culture needs to change.

    Indian coppers are as sloppy and shambolic as everything else over there. They would have little influence on events other than making things worse. A worldwide phenomenon that.

    Although the free market is bringing change as shambolic is not good business.

  6. In India it was a shambolic mess with random people wandering about all over and a scruffy, aimless air about it.

    I went to an Uzbek wedding like this. On the last night’s reception (it was a five day affair) a Russian and I finished a bottle of vodka before the bride and groom made it to the venue.

  7. I’ve been to a firework display in that very state. The police supervising there (both of them) were armed with bamboo sticks and nothing else. The fireworks were being let off in the street (literally – with people standing a few feet away from them). They set off a long string of Chinese crackers around a nearby park, with a gang of about ten children (ages 6-14) chasing after them a few feet behind. Having said that, the people setting up the fireworks were meticulous about safety. One of them earlier came running up to one of my colleagues who was smoking and demanded he put out the cigarette before allowing us entering the park.

  8. Odd how many religious festivals seem to end in carnage due to some completely foreseeable tragedy (eg crushes in Saudi Arabia, enormous explosions or fires in India, etc).

    You would think it might take an edge off religious belief.

  9. So Much For Subtlety

    Rob – “Odd how many religious festivals seem to end in carnage due to some completely foreseeable tragedy (eg crushes in Saudi Arabia, enormous explosions or fires in India, etc). You would think it might take an edge off religious belief.”

    That is an amazingly dim comment. Many religious festivals are the largest gatherings of human beings on the planet. India’s Kumbha Mela is enormous – in 2013 some 120 million people attended with the biggest day attracting 30 million. Which is a pretty good sized country. Anyone would have problems. But what is unusual is that they don’t have that many.

    Compare with Football events. Vastly smaller crowds. More common to have deaths.

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