Not something I would be happy using

Moscow has signed an agreement with Los Angeles-based company Hyperloop One to explore building a futuristic, high-speed transportation system known as a Hyperloop in the Russian capital.

Russian engineering on something like this?

Mr. Newman? You’re with me on this that truly high end performance stuff isn’t what we’d trust being done there by them?

27 thoughts on “Not something I would be happy using”

  1. But this would be what is technically known as a “Monorail!” surely? A cunning financial device for transferring taxpayers money to politicians via an impractical transport system.

    And as an aside, how happy would you be doing maintenance in a system that can be evacuated? It’s “get it in the airlock and flush it into space” in reverse.

  2. The Russians sent people into space and back (alive); they’re perfectly capable of getting it right if they put down the vodka for a few hours.

  3. I’d not worry: the chances of this thing actually going into operation, as opposed to the funds being siphoned off and into the London real estate market, are slim.

    Russians easily have the engineering skill and technical expertise to get anything done. What they lack is the management skill and discipline to ensure the engineers get paid.

  4. @Andrew M
    They sent some people into space and back (alive). I remember reading that they sent a bunch of other rockets up that didn’t make it – before they went up they were advertised as manned, but when they failed all the news stations reported them as unmanned.

    This was some time back, so I can’t recall the details – but could probably dig them up if needed.

  5. This view that the Russians could not build this advanced engineering projects was shared by the Germans in 1941. They had a shock when their tanks met up with the KV-1s and T34s.

    Just think of the bridge linking Russia with the Crimea, the power lines took less than 6 six months to complete.

    And how do you think the Yanks get their astronauts on the international space station these days?

    Time to engage brain Tim, nurture it, cut down on the sauce.

  6. John,

    You could post a letter in Moscow as you board the Siberia express, and, after the censor has read it, it would still be delivered in Siberia before you arrived thanks to the TU 144 mail service. The capitalists have nothing similar.

  7. So Much For Subtlety

    TheJollyGreenMan – “Just think of the bridge linking Russia with the Crimea, the power lines took less than 6 six months to complete.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baikal%E2%80%93Amur_Mainline

    In September 1984, a “golden spike” was hammered into place, connecting the eastern and western sections of the BAM. The Western media was not invited to attend this historic event as Soviet officials did not want any comments about the line’s operational status. In reality, only one third of the BAM’s track was fully operational for civilians, due to military reasons.[6]

    The BAM was again declared complete in 1991. By then, the total cost to build the line was US$14 billion.
    Crisis

    Beginning in the mid-1980s, the BAM-project attracted increasing criticism for bad planning. Infrastructure and basic services like running water were often not in place when workers arrived. At least 60 boomtowns developed around the route, but nowadays a lot of these places are deserted ghost towns and unemployment in the area is high. The building of the BAM has also been criticised for its complete lack of environmental protection.[7]

    When Soviet Union was dissolved, numerous mining and industrial projects in the region were cancelled, and the BAM was greatly underutilized until the late 1990s, running at a large operational deficit.

    “And how do you think the Yanks get their astronauts on the international space station these days?”

    Actually Russia’s rockets keep exploding these days. No one knows why. Putin is threatening executions.

  8. Just think of the bridge linking Russia with the Crimea, the power lines took less than 6 six months to complete.

    This one?

    Construction financing of the bridge across the Kerch Strait from Russia to Crimea, carrying out by the Strojgasmontazh Company, has been temporarily stopped.

    Forbes reports that for the last time Strojgasmontazh received money for the bridge construction purposes from budget in December 2015. 65.4 billion rubles, planned for budget year 2016, have not been allocated yet.

    As I said, it’s not the engineering expertise that kills Russian projects it’s the (lack of) funding and management.

    Plus, 6 months to lay a subsea power cable less than 5km is hardly impressive.

  9. Commies are good with infrastructure vanity projects while the rest of the country swims in shit.

    “oooh look! We’ve got a shiny new airport but we can’t get a plane in the air on time and only 1% of the country can afford to use it.”

  10. Tim Newman,

    You stated:-
    As I said, it’s not the engineering expertise that kills Russian projects it’s the (lack of) funding and management.

    I do agree with that 100%.

    And here in UK it is the Greenies that sprag projects with their terror tactics, handcuffing themselves to trees, gates, etc.

    And when will people realise that the old Soviet union is a total different animal to Russia. In Soviet times they couldn’t feed themselves from the richest agricultural land in the world, this season Russian grain exports exceed that of the USA.

  11. Hyperloop can improve life dramatically for the 16 million people in the greater Moscow area, cutting their commute to a fraction of what it is today.

    I’m calling bollocks on this one. Less than half, perhaps even one third of my commute is by train, the rest is walking and waiting. You wouldn’t save that much time on a 5, 10 or 20 minute commute, given it will have to accelerate and decelerate at a rate which wouldn’t turn the passengers inside out.

    For short journeys I can’t see much benefit. Longer journeys, e.g. Several hundred miles, you definitely would see a significant benefit.

  12. @Dongguan John

    Vanity projects aren’t just the preserve of the commies. The EU has built many, including unused airports in Spain. And as for us there is the insanity on stilts that is HS2.

  13. Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HTT) is a group of 500 part time engineers located across the United States who collaborate through weekly teleconferences. Rather than being paid directly, members work in exchange for stock options.

    Enough said ?

    There’s no Hyperloop and won’t be one until fundamental issue with this idea, aka “how exactly do remove air from few hundred miles long pipe” is resolved.

  14. And when will people realise that the old Soviet union is a total different animal to Russia.

    I’m fairly clued up on both…

    In Soviet times they couldn’t feed themselves from the richest agricultural land in the world, this season Russian grain exports exceed that of the USA.

    Ah right. You’ve kind of undone your own point: we are talking about modern-day Russia being able to pull off complex technological projects, and you cite grain exports. True, Russia manages their primary industries better now than in the Soviet times, but their secondary and tertiary industries remain mired in the same sovok mindset which plagued them in the USSR. Add to that gangsterism and corruption and it’s a miracle anything gets done in Russia, and when it does it normally comes in at a horrendous price and is of poor quality.

  15. Don’t tell anyone but the hyperloop is not for use on Earth.

    The target pressure inside the tubes is remarkably similar to the atmosphere on Mars. Right of way is currently free on Mars. Mars has, we believe, very little seismic activity. Hyperloop is meant to connect Martian colonies, not Earth cities.

    If Musk thought he could have made it profitably on Earth he would have set up the company himself. Instead what he did was to tell the world that hyperloop is a great technology and the lemmings are doing the research for him. For this particular project all he had to do was sell the hype, hence the name.

    For those that don’t know, Musk’s goal is to have his volcano lair on Mars. If you are the type that will actually acquire a volcano lair you are also the type that wants the biggest volcano possible.

  16. Russian Engineering in the Siberian Academy of Sciences at Novosibirsk was something to admire. When I asked one exhibitor (my halting Russian helped by our translator) about the possible impact of profit margins from competition from California, he replied that California was their largest market: the Californians who were making all the publicity about their technical expertise were buying their metal substrate from Siberia!
    Russians aren’t any more stupid than the rest of us but the brilliant non-conformists who went to Silicon Valley and made $millions in the USA got sent to Siberia where they shivered in winter and sweltered in summer.

  17. @ Tim Newman
    We need to distinguish between Russian engineers, some of whom are brighter than I, and the political system in which they work (somewhat worse than the French). as I see it, your complaint reflects the political system.

  18. We need to distinguish between Russian engineers, some of whom are brighter than I, and the political system in which they work (somewhat worse than the French). as I see it, your complaint reflects the political system.

    Exactly. You could say much the same for French engineers, working under what passes for French management.

  19. A young chum has recently had his first experience of American corporate management. He’s not at all impressed: the committee meetings, the endless bloody committee meetings.

  20. john77,

    Ukraine is no longer part of Russia.

    And the Crimea is no longer part of the Ukraine.

    Wheat exports that I mentioned comes from Russia where more than 70% of the farms are now in private hands.

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