Ritchie’s political analysis

In the event of a narrow remain win:

Agree a broad programme of reforms to be demanded from the EU

If remain win we’ve no power to demand anything at all. Twat.

38 thoughts on “Ritchie’s political analysis”

  1. Bloke in North Dorset

    And if we don’t get his reforms will he then demand another referendum or even that Parliament just goes for out? Because if he doesn’t then there’s no point in even starting negotiations.

  2. The Meissen Bison

    I was disappointed earlier by the splendid Van_Patten’s backing Owen Jones over Richard Murphy in the cretinous moron stakes.

    Personally, I think Richard Murphy is at least a nose ahead but that aside, at least Jones looks like his mum still buys his clothes while Murphy has the appearance of someone who goes through the bin behind the outsize shop.

  3. “Agree to pretend to present a broad programme of reforms to be demanded from the EU, then dropped later when it all dies down”

    Amended for clarity.

  4. Tim

    It’s worth reading the PDF from his ‘Why I’m voting Remain’ blog – it’s like entering a De Beers showroom in terms of gems – I reckon you’d get 10 to 15 posts out of it….

  5. They should be negotiating hard now, winning concession upon concession, if they want to persuade people to vote Remain. Negotiating after the vote is just shouting at the wind.

  6. Peter Hitchens passes on the news “Cameron, Brown, Blair and Major’ to share platform’ in last-ditch bid to keep Britain in EU.”

    I know we’re supposed to deplore the idea of public executions but I’d pay good money if this was actually a hanging.

    I’d take the kids to witness this delicious spectacle, and then we’d organise a hunt for Mandleson, with a shiny gold sovereign for the winner.

    Bury them in unhallowed ground in the same pit as the traitors Ted Heath and Lord Haw Haw.

  7. Over on TRUK, the interestingly named Joan Owens has been reminding the faithful that if, the EU really is hardcoded as neoliberal, then a vote to Remain is also a vote for neoliberalism. This seems to have prompted the unheard-of differences of opinion over there.

    Murphy’s response, that a Gove / Johnson government would be close to fascism, is ridiculously short-termist, and just doesn’t stand-up.

    He may be coming to realise that his support for the EU is goingto spike a great many of his guns in the battles ahead.

  8. Jack C,

    It’s broadly neoliberal. But it’s dim of the left not to see that the UK is even more so. Really, if they want socialism, moving to Greece or a few bits of South America seem to be the best options.

  9. TMB

    I know! I think Murphy in retrospect is less literate and articulate than Jones, and certainly lacks his intelligence. However, Jones is guaranteed to raise my hackles to an even greater than Murphy I think – the fact so many ‘luvvies’ hang on his every word, and his idiotic outpourings are considered worth more than a hill of beans is driving my dislike for him.

    Although when I think about it could be the fact that Jones banned me on Twitter (one of only 4 people to do so) merely for suggesting, after his telegraphed ‘humourous tweet to the effect that following Kim Jong-il’s death ‘Robert Mugabe’s Christmas Card List just got a little shorter’ that ‘he shouldn’t worry, he’d still be on it’ – although that’s probably questionable after his latest outburst….

  10. The Inimitable Steve

    “Cameron, Brown, Blair and Major’ to share platform’ in last-ditch bid to keep Britain in EU.”

    Lol! I hope they do: Napoleon was right.

    Unpopular politicians remind you there’s a referendum soon, dare you to vote FUCK YOU.

    seems to me that a narrow Remain vote gives us a strong negotiating position – we can always hold another referendum.

    Ha! Brilliant! I love your parody of how SJW’s think. Lovely stuff.

  11. Oh Geeze-us H!

    A Chris Worthington comments on the TRUK blog advertising the paperback edition of the Joy of Tax:

    “Great news Richard – will be added to reading list for a new final year undergraduate module”

    Where is the Fahrenheit 451 hit squad when you need them?

  12. Richard

    Quite probably. UWE therefore needs to be added to the list of higher education establishments at which one should emphatically not allow one’s child to study.

    One could investigate the individual faculties in drawing up this list, eg

    Business and Law at UWE
    Economics at City
    Accountancy at Essex
    whatever faculty Ivan Horrocks teaches at the Open Uni
    etc

    but I think it is probably safer to assume that any institution which allows fvckwits like these onto its staff anywhere, is beyond rational consideration for decent education or study.

  13. BF

    Wow – Horrocks is an engineering don at OU – amazing! Surely the security services need to be taking a close look at his activities, especially during the 80s to see whether a treason charge can be bought – might save one from being obliged to read his hate-filled screeds on a periodic basis…

  14. SJW

    Assuming you aren’t as the Inimitable Steve suggests a parody account, do you seriously believe an organisation like the EU will simply allow the threat of a referendum to extract concessions? Seriously?

  15. The Meissen Bison

    Business and Law at UWE
    Economics at City
    Accountancy at Essex
    whatever faculty Ivan Horrocks teaches at the Open Uni
    etc

    In the days when these courses were cheap(ish), there might have been some justification for going to somewhere like Bristol Poly for a few years for the fun of it.

    I suspect that the market (pbui) will sort this out for us – it must begin to dawn on folk that >£30k of student debt on fees -not including accommodation and beer- is too high a price to pay for a third class qualification taught by z-list ‘professors’ in academic also-rans.

  16. the oft mentioned 0.2 Professor doesn’t even deserve that. He teaches 1 hour a week, a total of 30 hours a year. He’s also done f all academic research since he’s been there so what the fuck is his title for?

  17. I suspect the real reason Richie is supporting Remain is because he has burnt too many bridges in the UK, where his influence is now somewhere between nought and zero, and it ain’t going anywhere between now and 2025, when he will be nearly 70.

    The only way he can get anyone to listen to him is through Europe.

  18. So Much For Subtlety

    Social Justice Warrior – “It seems to me that a narrow Remain vote gives us a strong negotiating position – we can always hold another referendum.”

    That must be one of the dumbest posts I have ever seen you make. Why would anyone grant a single concession if we have voted to remain? We have a very good example of this over in Quebec. The Separatists put the question to people in 1980. They said no. They did nothing about independence for over a decade. Then they tried a tricky question to the people in 1995. They lost again – although only narrowly. Their support has collapsed. They have managed to hold on to power but only by gerrymander or as a minority government. They don’t even have that at the moment although they might recover.

    Leaving is a threat. A threat is only a threat if you are willing to carry it out. Willing and able. The Scottish Nationalist Party can huff and puff all they like but their threat is not credible. They tried it on at the polls and they lost. Britain would be in the same position.

  19. SMFS, the Scots Nats have done pretty well out of Barnett. My impression is, although I may be wrong, the Bloc Quebecois, or whatever they’re called, also has done pretty well in securing beanos for its people.

    Bremain = we become the whingeing shake-down artists of Europe.

  20. I can confirm Ed Lud’s observation about Quebec. Taxpayers in the RoC (‘rest of Canada’) pour more money in there than you can imagine. Difficult to know whether it is to appease separatists, though, or the more traditional purpose of buying a nice solid block of seats in the House of Commons.

  21. do you seriously believe an organisation like the EU will simply allow the threat of a referendum to extract concessions?

    ‘demand’, ‘threat’, ‘extract concessions’: these are the wrong words. Cameron isn’t going to make threats. He’s going to explain to his European colleagues that he expects popular support for Brexit to continue to grow if the EU carries on as before, and that the more popular Brexit gets, the more likely there is to be another referendum.

    The EU is very keen for the UK not to leave, because that would blow a hole in its budget.

    There are some principles – free movement of labour is one – which won’t be changed. But it’s not a matter of principle that nearly 40% of the EU budget should go to farmers. If the consequence of continuing that is that the budget shrinks, realpolitik will come into play.

  22. The Canadians I know would love for Quebec to vote to secede. They’d like to see the backs of the Quebeckers and shit like Bill 101.

  23. Ted S, if we vote Remain, the rest of Europe will be longing for us to leave. If they’re not already.

    I had an interesting chat with a cultivated Polish chap a few weeks back. His view was that Europe’s last best hope is the English exceptionalism characterized by bloody-minded love of liberty. I paraphrase, but accurately.

    I hope he’s right, but have little enough of his faith.

  24. So Much For Subtlety

    Edward Lud – “the Scots Nats have done pretty well out of Barnett. My impression is, although I may be wrong, the Bloc Quebecois, or whatever they’re called, also has done pretty well in securing beanos for its people.”

    Sure but the Barnett Formula was introduced in 1978. The year before the other referendum. That is, the threat of leaving produces more cash. Actually pulling the trigger and holding a vote on it does not if the people do not vote the right way. There is no reason to give the SNP more money now and it is unlikely they will get much. The voters have spoken and they voted to Stay.

    I assume Brussels does see us as whiners like the Scots and the Quebeckers. Except we give more than we get back. Which is not true of Scotland. The solution is to leave.

  25. “threats. He’s going to explain to his European colleagues that he expects popular support for Brexit to continue to grow if the EU carries on as before, and that the more popular Brexit gets, the more likely there is to be another referendum.”

    And they will laugh and say “ja ja”.

    Is this the very definition of “soft power”?

  26. It is significantly cheaper to go to university in Quebec than British Columbia yet BC generally pays more to the federal purse than it receives, Quebec receives more than it pays in.
    The issue is you have to get the deal in place so the referendum goes the ‘right’ way, intimidate the other side into buying the result they want. This is where Cameron et al have failed, they won’t secure anything much after the vote now.

  27. So Much For Subtlety

    Social Justice Warrior – “Cameron isn’t going to make threats. He’s going to explain to his European colleagues that he expects popular support for Brexit to continue to grow if the EU carries on as before, and that the more popular Brexit gets, the more likely there is to be another referendum.”

    Cameron went to Brussels a couple of weeks ago and explained to his colleagues that he expected popular support for Brexit to continue to grow if the EU Carried on as before, and the more popular Brexit gets the more likely it is that the British would vote to leave.

    All he asked for was a couple of token press releases that would change nothing.

    They laughed at him and would not even give him a minimum of face-saving respect. They treated him like a naughty schoolboy. He came away with nothing.

    If he won and Britain voted to remain, why would they give him more? The momentum would have been gone. It would be another ten years before another vote. With no credible threat why would the people who p!ssed in his tea before suddenly start treating him with respect after?

  28. Given the EU fondness for rerunning referendums when they don’t go the way they want I wouldn’t be at allsurprised if there’s another one within the 2 years or so it would take to negotiate the exit. Of course even a .001% win for remain will be evidence of support to push ahead with the Grand Project and ever closer union.

  29. SJW

    You have a very benign view of the EU – Firstly you make a very valid point – the UK’s departure would leave the number of net contributor nations lower (although intriguingly it is much higher now than it once was) – I’m not surprised incidentally Le Pen is likely to top the poll in France – those voters must be livid that they are the second biggest net contributor – however, as SMFS pointed out, I don;t think part of the Europhile establishment would give two hoots about the financial impact – we have gone against the only permitted direction of travel – and for that we need to be punished….

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