More Brexit idiocy about food

You know where this is going. Brexit feels to me like grief, and, deep in mourning, I can’t stop thinking of the loved one, and all that she brought me. Of course, it’s possible to exaggerate the effect the EU has had on our eating habits. Things would have changed anyway, in the end; British supermarkets, for better or worse, sell sushi now. But it certainly speeded things up,

No, it was sod all to do with the EU.

What happened is that we got rich and could become foodies.

40 thoughts on “More Brexit idiocy about food”

  1. Britain is notably more interested in a big variety of food styles compared to any other EU member. Any. Bit of a hint surely that Japan and of course India not in EU. Before the War there was smaller but still big variety of national restaurant types (French, Greek, Italian, Russian). Wrecked by rationing, which perversely was continued by socialists fir some time after the war.

    Also one of Wilson’s successes in EEC renegotiation in 1974/5 was to allow importing cheaper food from the Commonwealth.

  2. The sheer volume of nice things attributed to EU that often predate it (or even EEC) is staggering.

  3. “As a result, it’s difficult not to see this as a door closing – a refrigerator door, behind which there sits, in my dreams, an oozing brie de Meaux, a blushing hunk of culatello, and a small bowl of salty Nardin boquerones. How much more expensive are such treats likely soon to be?”

    Well, not much because things like brie and cured meat can be produced here, or well, almost anywhere in the world. If they raise prices, the people on the Welsh border making prosciutto will take their business. Or we can have zero tariff trade with Africa and start buying it from Morocco or Kenya.

  4. But, Tim, our becoming rich was solely the result of our EU membership. Haven’t you heard: post hoc ergo propter hoc? It was the main argument put forward by the Remain campaign.

  5. Bloke in North Dorset

    WTF is this supposed to mean?

    British supermarkets, for better or worse, sell sushi now.

    Anyway, I thought the Guardian was for us all being locavores so there version of Brexit where EU members refuse to sell us anything should be a good thing.

  6. They make Camembert in Senegal. Can’t wait for the first post-Brexit shipment.

    BTW “post-Brexit” comes up on my Android spell-checker. A sign of the times.

  7. More shite from the “London nice” bubble.

    What is needed is a publicity campaign to put some energy and ambition into the denizens of the “London nasty” bubble. That is the criminals –both local and the teeming imports. A campaign to get them to stop shitting where they eat–ie stop preying on the poor people around them in their crappy areas–and go Up West (if that still applies geographically). Start preying on the well-off, brainless, sympathy-sucking, shite-soft leftist CM scum in the nice bubble.

    Apart for some action during the riots and the Rolex Raiders –very few of the very nasty scum that infest the capital city have the brains or ambition to go after the much softer and easier targets that the nice bubblers present.

    This is a big shame. It would be nice to see one lot of scum having a go at another lot of scum esp when the nice bubblers are full of leftist faux sympathy for the nasties.

  8. The Meissen Bison

    I love this game of using recondite foreign food as sophistication signalling even when it’s rather undermined by mutton-headedness on matters of how trade works.

    Moreover, as any only averagely retarded GCSE home ‘economics’ pupil will tell you, brie, whether from Meaux or Melun has no business to be oozing behind the doors of a refrigerator but should be kept on a slate shelf in the larder.

  9. Before we joined the Common Market I can remember enjoying French, Italian, Chinese, Indian, Hungarian, Greek, Turkish, and Georgian (USSR) restaurants. And my memory is distinctly patchy, so there must have been more. Oh yes; also Danish. And probably more yet.

    Whereas after joining the Common Market, the biggest growth seems to have been in American and Thai.

  10. Before we rail against this Brexit reasoning … she’s basically right.. there should be no tariffs on food. She’s not right about all the silly DOC rules but something tells me that’s what the next 2 1/2 years is going to be taken up with.

  11. The gradual recovery from post-war austerity (thanks, Stafford Cripps!) had nothing to do with it then?

  12. It would be nice to see one lot of scum having a go at another lot of scum esp when the nice bubblers are full of leftist faux sympathy for the nasties.

    When this has happened in Sweden, Norway, and Germany the lefties fall over themselves to excuse their attackers. One demented woman even lied to the police about the identity of her rapist because she didn’t want to fuel racism. These people need their own planet.

  13. TMB

    “Moreover, as any only averagely retarded GCSE home ‘economics’ pupil will tell you, brie, whether from Meaux or Melun has no business to be oozing behind the doors of a refrigerator but should be kept on a slate shelf in the larder.”

    Indeed, and there are strange people like me who like their brie and camembert positively stinky rancid and runny

  14. French supermarkets are excellent in certain ways, but are temples to narrow-minded insularity and xenophobia.

    Therefore it must be NATO and not the EU that gave us sushi and all the rest.

  15. “kept on a slate shelf in the larder”: who nowadays has a proper, north wall, ventilated larder? We had when I was a lad – it’s why my mother could get off with holding out against the fridge that the rest of us wanted.

  16. The Meissen Bison

    dearieme: well quite but if we’re going to be pretentious about food we might as well go the whole hog, n’est-ce pas?

    I feel it can’t be long before a lifestyle article appears extolling the joys of the meat safe.

  17. This is all getting rather common.

    Our larder was certainly proper, north wall and ventilated, and was in France where it should be. (Not entirely convenient as we didn’t live in France, but standards).

    Some of the more simple-minded servants might have liked a fridge, but no family members entertained vulgar, American innovations of any sort. Least of all my mother*.

    * Assuming she is my mother: we were/are so sophisticated, it wasn’t just paternity that couldn’t be guaranteed in our circle.

  18. Brexit the movie:

    Charlie Croker: There are a quarter of a million Italians in Britain and they’ll be made to suffer. Every restaurant, cafe, ice-cream parlor, gambling den and nightclub in London, Liverpool and Glasgow will be smashed

  19. TN: Sadly, NASA have no plans to build a B Ark, and neither has Elon Musk.

    Jack C: It’s a few years ago now but buying wine in a French supermarket (Géant, Auchan? can’t remember), in all the several aisles of French wine there was a very narrow section labelled Étranger, and that probably didn’t even have any Californian.

  20. TG,
    Yes, and the minimal Forrin wine shelves are kept in what must be a deliberate state of disorder.

    There was a time when I’d only buy French wine in France, on the when-in-Rome principle, but don’t buy it at all now. Non-French Calais warehouses have alternatives, and French wine quality is just too variable, (for those of us who take a Mediterranean view of wine drinking anyway). Some of it is outright disgusting.

  21. Unless it’s a specific label that you know well, buying French wine in France is largely pot luck. If you’re lucky, you can find good local produce at a good price, but if you’re unlucky it can be over-priced gut-rot (and there’s more of the latter than the former). Whereas in the UK, you have to work really hard to find something undrinkable no matter how cheap you go (if you avoid the Buckie). Our local Co-op mini-store is currently offering a very nice Garnacha for £4.99.

  22. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I suppose the fact I have Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano, buffalo-milk Mozzarella, Pecorino, Asiago, Brie, Camembert, Roquefort, Havarti, Danish Blue and Manchego (among many others) in my local supermarket is a tip-off that Costa Rica joined the EU while no-one was looking.

  23. kept on a slate shelf in the larder”: who nowadays has a proper, north wall, ventilated larder?

    Yup. Coldest room in the house. Of course, with change of use, it’s now between the dining room and the library rather than the kitchen and the dining room (and we think the now library was converted from dining to billiards the minute the mother of the then owner was moved out. She was wee Free and even more fanatical than the norm. )

    However. Will be building a wine cellar on the north side when I can get the readies together.

  24. “Unless it’s a specific label that you know well, buying French wine in France is largely pot luck.”

    I disagree. Look for the wines that received a gold medal at the Paris Concours. Not infallible, but a good guide to quality in mid-priced wines – providing you like the style.

  25. “Non-French Calais warehouses have alternatives, and French wine quality is just too variable”

    French supermarket wine is generally poor. Better to go to a cave in the region that makes it and you can taste and buy, or just go to Majestic at Calais.

  26. Notice how Rachel Cooke in her pathetic article conflates ‘Europe’ with the ‘EU’. Remainiacs do this constantly, and its very tiresome. Mass tourism improved British cuisine, not the EU.

  27. Yes, partly; but how many people read Elizabeth David? Meanwhile, from the 60s onwards, millions of Brits visited France, Italy, Spain etc, and found that foreign food was often better than British fare. Pizza, paella, chorizo, brie, camembert, olives, olive oil etc expanded their horizons.

  28. Look for the wines that received a gold medal at the Paris Concours.

    I can’t recall ever spotting such an endorsement, but it sounds like a good tip and I’ll keep my eyes open next time I’m in La France profonde (next month, as it happens). As I said, there are good value French wines, but there’s also a lot of stuff that they’d be ashamed to sell at an Esso garage.

  29. I’m really confused – I thought that eating sushi was cultural appropriation? Aren’t we meant to be only eating local food that our local area produces and is relevant to us in our area only?

    Eating sushi is cultural appropriation, as is eating Brie, as is eating Frankfurters etc etc etc.

    Toad in the hole (obviously only if made with locally grown mushroom meat, can’t be eating meat) and spotted dick (sorry, spotted pudding?) is perfectly nutritious and culturally appropriate for you pommy bastards (I’m allowed that one as you can’t be racist against English folk – I’ve checked).

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