News just in – Guardian leader writers are twats

Some may be tempted to dismiss Nigel Farage’s resignation on Monday as leader of Ukip as just another piece of characteristic impulsiveness. That Nigel, what a card, he’s always resigning. Did it in 2009. Didn’t last. Tried it after last year’s election. Didn’t last. Now he’s done it again this year. Always comes back though – the bookies still have him at 2/1 to lead Ukip into the 2020 election. So ignore it. It’s just Nigel. He’s not serious.

Maybe, but the context could hardly be more serious. And Mr Farage should take responsibility for a change. Britain has just voted to leave the European Union. Barely 10 days on from that historic decision, two of the people most directly responsible for winning the vote have simply walked away. Boris Johnson fronted the official leave campaign and has now thrown in the towel in the Conservative contest because he has been disowned by Michael Gove. Mr Farage fronted the lavishly funded unofficial campaign and he has quit too.

Where is any drop of moral seriousness, or any ounce of public responsibility, in that? There seems to be none in either man. Both Mr Johnson and Mr Farage were willing until less than a fortnight ago to do anything, to say anything, and to rubbish anyone who disagreed with them in the cause of leaving the EU. Yet they never once said what leaving would actually look like. They mocked anyone who expressed concerns.

Yet, having won, they simply walk away.

The model of someone in politics to achieve a task, that done to leave politics, just doesn’t seem to gain traction in Guardian minds, does it?

That most in hte trade are mere careerists is obvious, but the possibility of someone being principled seems to escape them.

47 thoughts on “News just in – Guardian leader writers are twats”

  1. News just in – Guardian leader writers are twats

    Hardly ‘news’ is it?

    The Guardian – wrong on everything, all the time.

  2. I think you’re missing the point, Tim. If they had actually achieved the task, then a well earned retirement would be entirely justified.

    The big problem is they haven’t achieved the task. All they’ve achieved is the first step. The actual task is figuring out what the heck Brexit is supposed to look like. That’s kind of important, and neither Boris nor Farage seems to have the first clue.

  3. I find the Guardian very reassuring. Whatever their line, I can rely on it. And immediately go in the opposite direction. In politics, Labour, in taxation, Ritchie, very comporting.

  4. Adam,

    What else is Farage to do? He’s not in the government, he’s not an MP. And won’t get elected to parliament.

    And Farage and Boris aren’t supposed to have a clue. That should have been something the government had a plan for, the government that called a referendum and weeks before could see it was close.

  5. Those people whining about Farage and Johnson were calling them twats and incompetents and crazy and dangerous and etc… just instants before. They should be happy now, shouldn’t they?

  6. Soarer,

    Fascinating stuff.

    “Focus groups reflected simmering resentment of foreign interference in the case of Obama”

    Haha

  7. bloke (temporarily not) in spain

    I’d imagine, if Farage’s opinions on Brexit strategies were requested he’d be quite free in sharing them, wouldn’t he Tim? But the Graun’s incapable of seeing anything as being other than a party political contest. A campaign.
    But that does seem to be the progressive default position.Everything as a campaign. Even if the campaign’s successful,that’s no reason not to carry on campaigning.
    Not unconnected with their being remunerative careers amongst campaigners, I’d hazard.

  8. Admission. (Gulp!)
    My name is John and I was a Grauniad reader for donkey’s years. Not any more.
    In my opinion it used to be a truly liberal newspaper with pretty balanced views but, in the last few years, it’s become utterly one-sided, whereby all Left good and all Right bad. The ridiculous Toynbee, with her screaming North London Socialism is the one person I’d really like to…
    Nurse! The screens!
    Thank you.

  9. No Adam, it was the Remainers who “didn’t have a clue”. And now they have lost. Just lost. Not “lost the first referendum that concentrates the nation’s minds so it can think again more seriously”. Not “lost this week’s opinion poll. Never mind, rhere’s always next week. We’ll make the right decision soon”. Not “if we march and shout and stamp our feet angrily everyone else will change their minds”.Just lost!

    Isn’t it about time the Remainers got themselves a clue about which way the world rotates?

  10. The Guardianistas can scream and shout, but Farage is right to call it quits. Although I don’t quite agree with his reasoning why.

    The thing he doesn’t address is the fact that even with forced elections because of a breakdown over Brexit, his party could never get enough seats in the House of Commons to make a difference.
    Because first-past-the-post, and the lack of actual popular representation because of it.
    There’d need to be a radical change in UK election law before anyone but the Big Two can get a serious foothold in actual government, and there lies the problem.

    You’d need a second referendum to fix this, because , face it, the current Lords and Ladies are not going to vote for something that will diminish their power base..

  11. The Guardian are aware that Farage is not an MP, is not a member of the Tory party, has no position in the current government or cabinet… right? Right?

    I swear reading The Guardian actively reduces one’s intelligence. Writing for The Guardian even more so.

  12. Grikath,

    But his party did make a difference. I’m not a fan of FPTP, but the power of 3rd parties is in being able to destroy enough votes to lose other parties seats, to force them to take actions to lessen their effects.

    The narrative of the last election was that UKIP didn’t do very well, but that’s because they forced Cameron to promise a referendum.

    It’s why you should never, ever tactically vote.

  13. Re: Grikath

    “There’d need to be a radical change in UK election law before anyone but the Big Two can get a serious foothold in actual government, and there lies the problem.”

    Well the Labour party cannot reconcile its internal conflicts, and will shatter, and it remains to be seen whether the Tory party can either. We are as they say interesting times…

  14. “The narrative of the last election was that UKIP didn’t do very well”

    Well 4m votes, more than the SNP and LIbDems combined, would suggest they were actually very successful, despite losing some votes to the Tories because of the referendum pledge. That didn’t translate into seats, yes, but thats not UKIPs fault, just the way the FPTP system works.

    Put it this way, if the Tories don’t take us out of the EU by 2020 then a lot of sitting MPs (Labour and Tory) better start packing because a fair few constituencies will turn purple.

  15. @Anon:

    “Farage and Boris aren’t supposed to have a clue. ”

    Well that’s lucky, isn’t it?

    You may find it reassuring that they have succeeded in their plan despite having no clue what their plan actually was. Forgive me if I don’t share your optimism.

  16. That leader is the usual Guardian bilge. That said, I wish Farage had remained UKIP’s leader until we knew that there wouldn’t be an early general election and article 50 had been triggered.

  17. Remember it was important not to have ‘a plan’ because the media would have focussed entirely on trashing it, trying to look for and create splits etc – something they learned from the Scottish Referendum. Instead of focussing on why we should leave the EU and admittedly the Leave Campaign were rubbish at highlighting the Sovereignty issue, Lisbon Treaty etc, the BBC et all would have spent their whole time doing what they do best, sneering and ridiculing the opposition, putting words in people’s mouths and trying to divide and rule.

  18. “You may find it reassuring that they have succeeded in their plan despite having no clue what their plan actually was. Forgive me if I don’t share your optimism.”

    Well, they didn’t think they’d need one, as the Prime Minister said he’d be staying, regardless of the result. Before he quit hours after.

  19. There’s a lovely Larsen cartoon of a dog looking up lovingly at his master, who appears to be saying; “Woof woof woof woof BONE woof woof.”

    Bit like the Grauniad except their writers’ go; “Bargle, Bargle Bargle HATE Bargle Bargle.”

    And they’re more stupid than the dog. Even a cartoon dog.

  20. Adam,
    For crying out loud, the question was In or Out.

    The elected government is responsible for what happens next. Also, and very importantly, “what happens next” can be fought over at elections.

    Gisella Stuart and Dan Hannan will not have the same view. You get that surely?

  21. Right, so we all agreed then that no-one has the first clue what Brexit actually means, and it was never the job of Boris or Farage to have any ideas along those lines.

    OK then. Glad we’ve cleared that up.

    I do find it amusing when people are in denial about having been well and truly played.

  22. Adam
    July 5, 2016 at 11:51 am

    Right, so we all agreed then that no-one has the first clue what Brexit actually means

    You may not know what it is – nut then most Ramina voters seem to have had little idea of the alternatives to the EU.

    Of course there is a plan:

    The UK will make all its own laws
    The UK will negotiate all its own trade deals
    The UK will control its own borders.

    What laws, trade deals and controls there are will depend on the government of the day (Labour, Tory, LD, Green, SNP, Coalition – whatever), elected by the voters.

    Democracy. Good, isn’t it?

  23. Adam~: What does Remain mean?

    Do we join a European army?
    How much poliutical union do we sign up for? Do we even have a choice?
    Will we agree to migrant quotas? Do we even have a choice?
    Will we be bailing our Italy’s banks? France’s? Deutsche Bank even?

    etc etc

    There’s a hell of a lot more uncertainty on the remain side if you cocksuckers just had the intellect and the honesty to admit it…

  24. Adam,
    You do see the point don’t you?

    Many on the left should be pleased. Leave means that a Corbyn government would be able to enact Corbynite policies. This is not possible at the moment (which is why the Beloved and Holy EU used to be derided as a bunch of neoliberal bastards. Up until the 22nd).

  25. Right, so we all agreed then that no-one has the first clue what Brexit actually means

    Actually, we know exactly what Brexit actually means. It means we leave the EU. Nothing more, nothing less.

    What happens after that is entirely up to the government of the day.

  26. Agree with previous posters; Farage has zero control over what Brexit looks like, given he is not a member of government or even an MP.

    To criticise him for not being around to shape Brexit is just plain stupid, and makes the people that have done so, like the Guardian and Juncker, look wilfully foolish.

    However, given the importance of the next government or two in setting the scene for the future, UKIP as a party still has relevance in keeping the main parties honest. So whoever leads it, I hope they are not a crank, even if I am not a supporter

  27. “…the lavishly funded unofficial campaign…”

    As opposed to the one that had the entire resources of the government, the EU, the bbc, the legacy media, and the whole political class behind it?

    THAT lavishly funded! No wonder they won. /sarc

  28. That most in the trade are mere careerists is obvious, but the possibility of someone being principled seems to escape them.

    Amongst the journalistic class, as with the political class, displays of integrity are often mistaken for displays of weakness.

  29. “…the lavishly funded unofficial campaign…”

    This is a classic tactic, used often by the Green lobby. Portray your opponents as rich and powerful, and don’t mention that Green groups have incomes in the hundreds of millions and a direct line to major broadcasters such as the BBC.

  30. Bloke in Germany

    John the bridge has left me with uncomfortable, carry-on-esque visions of what he might do to La Poll (and have done to him by La Poll) behind hospital screens.

    I guess at least the Fexit is a pre-emptive rejection of a peerage. He should at least have the grace to now secure a brexit majority in parliament, denounce the tory remainer who will become PM and the 75% of pro-remain MPs. Could be an interesting UKIP/Lib Dem fight if we have an early election – if not – I guess continued rule by distant, unaccountable, and not entirely democratic elites. The idea that this is some great throwing off of big government is nonsense – most brexit voters want to tax you harder, not less.

    Neither side had any clue what a post-brexit world would look like.

  31. Bloke in Germany

    It is sweetly ironic to hear kippers bleating like special snowflakes about FPTP.. After all – the alternative was soundly beaten in a referendum pretty recently. Do they want to re-run that referendum perchance?

  32. “It is sweetly ironic to hear kippers bleating like special snowflakes about FPTP”

    Could be. With the more “passionate” (vengeful) Remainers flocking to Corbyn, with the insistence that the popular vote MUST be respected, irony is not something we’re short of right now.

  33. “Right, so we all agreed then that no-one has the first clue what Brexit actually means”

    It means leaving the European Union; did you not read the ballot paper?

  34. Bloke in Germany: “It is sweetly ironic to hear kippers bleating like special snowflakes about FPTP.”

    Can you provide any links?

  35. You’re full of sauerkraut and crap Biggie. Take out that German citizenship. And make sure your arsehole is well-greased for when the RoP knocks on your door.

  36. Been busy with the burgers Larri?

    You should get your boss to bring out a new line of socialist cuisine–Fish-eye soup, boiled grass, soviet-style axle-grease burgers, Venezuelan cat fritters etc.

    And of course with humble pie for dessert. Cos all you leftist scum are going to choke to death on that.

  37. Having a bad day Larri?

    Expect many, many more of them.

    And as for Eichmann–one of your fellow socialists–you should try to keep it straight in your head that it is your gang that has murdered 150 million people.

  38. For someone who’s only trick is to say scum in five different ways, you are unsurprisingly ill-educated.

  39. “The model of someone in politics to achieve a task, that done to leave politics, just doesn’t seem to gain traction in Guardian minds, does it?that done to leave politics, just doesn’t seem to gain traction in Guardian minds, does it?

    That most in the trade are mere careerists is obvious, but the possibility of someone being principled seems to escape them.”

    But Farage hasn’t left politics. All he’s done is to resign as the leader of UKIP. He remains an MEP, which I don’t call “leaving politics”.

    If he were to resign as an MEP, that would indeed be principled. But he hasn’t, so he ain’t.

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