New Zealand’s shame!

Unicef’s definition of child poverty in New Zealand is children living in households who earn less than 60% of the median national income – NZ$28,000 a year, or NZ$550 a week.

The fact that twice as many children now live below the poverty line than did in 1984 has become New Zealand’s most shameful statistic.

“We have normalised child poverty as a society – that a certain level of need in a certain part of the population is somehow OK,” said Vivien Maidaborn, executive director of Unicef New Zealand.

Oh, you mean inequality has increased a bit?

7 thoughts on “New Zealand’s shame!”

  1. Its largely down to middle class/high income families being small now than decades ago, but polynesian/low income families still often being 6/8/10 strong, even when there is a single parent.

  2. “We have normalised child poverty as a society – that a certain level of need in a certain part of the population is somehow OK,”

    Have we? Amazing. And here I thought there might be practical limits to state largesse, and moral hazard of such largesse being abused. It must be so *simple* to be a lefty campaigner.

  3. Don’t the inumerate f*ckwits grasp the concept that by pinning a definition to a percentage of an average they can never actually solve the problem?

    I suppose that’s a feature rather than a bug for the SJWs though.

  4. “Don’t the inumerate f*ckwits grasp the concept that by pinning a definition to a percentage of an average they can never actually solve the problem?”

    The measure was specifically created with that intent.

  5. Don’t the inumerate f*ckwits grasp the concept that by pinning a definition to a percentage of an average they can never actually solve the problem?

    In this case I think that the SJWs who came up with the idea of relative poverty were very intelligent as it will keep them in jobs forever. It is the media that is full of innumerate fuckwits who don’t hold the fraudulent use of the term “poverty” by organisations like Unicef up to account.

    As it is there is bugger all poverty here; a few poor people but no poverty. How much would you pay for insurance that covered you for unlimited hospital care, GP care if you are sickly or young, education, pension, housing if required, unemployment etc etc? Discount this back to a present day values and I doubt anybody born in this country isn’t a millionaire.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *