Spot the naked industry self interest report here

Nearly one in five (18pc) pairs pairs of prescription glasses could be putting people at risk of driving illegally or falling over, eye experts have warned, with spectacles bought online posing a heightened safety risk to consumers.

Report done by?

A damning study on the quality of glasses sold in the UK, funded by the College Optometrists, has warned prescription glasses wearers going online in search of a cheaper deal that they may be more exposed to dangers caused by poor vision.

The College (of) Optometrists being largely those who do not sell on line of course.

The major difficulty seems to be pupillary distance. And from memory it’s difficult to get a optometrist, who has just charged you for an eye test, to put the pupillary distance on the prescription.

When people order in store an optician usually measures their their pupilary distance using specialist equipment. But when glasses are purchased online the measure is usually supplied by the customer, which leads to inaccuracies.

Insist that that distance is put on the prescription, as with the other information then.

10 thoughts on “Spot the naked industry self interest report here”

  1. I get my specs online, largely because I can get two pairs I like for £50 rather than one for £200*. Getting a copy of yer prescription off a high street optician is tricky though- I’ve had them refuse in the past.

    (*how many times was I told I’d need to pay an extra £100 for super thin lenses to go with that pair of frames because of my prescription? When i did my first order on line for a similar style of specs, I didn’t bother paying the extra tenner they charged for super thin and guess what? It was all fine. High street opticians can go fuck themselves)

  2. Didn’t I read on here that in the good old days of the NHS monopoly on spectacles, the optician would refuse to give the customer the results of the eye test and the prescription because it was “their” property?

  3. John Square
    Interesting, but what do you do about fitting the specs to your head and nose? I can imagine High Street opticians being less than enthusiastic about fitting specs bought online.

  4. I’ve never been refused my prescription but have always been refused my PD. That’s when it’s handy to know a little bit of law.

    Any data (including PD) which is personally identifiable and attributable falls under the Data Protection Act and you can therefore ask for it using a subject access request which they can’t reasonably refuse. They can charge you a tenner for it but they can’t refuse.

  5. ” Interesting, but what do you do about fitting the specs to your head and nose? ”
    Wire frames, do what the optician does. Pair of pliers & a little judicious bending. Plastic frames respond to hot water.

  6. @Theo

    “Interesting, but what do you do about fitting the specs to your head and nose? I can imagine High Street opticians being less than enthusiastic about fitting specs bought online.”

    Never been a problem for me, honestly. I measured a pair of specs I’d bought from Vision express and used that data to compare against the ones on the website. Worked fine.

    Glasses Direct send you up to four pits of sample frames through the post for you to try on, if yer want, but I’ve never bothered.

    One reason why- my first order was for two pairs at a total cost of £36 quid (using an offer) and I figured that it wasn’t a significant investment i they turned out to be a bit shit or uncomfortable.

  7. Try zenni optical. Bifocal photochromic USD70 to my door (Australia).
    They tell you how to do PD (ruler and partner/mirror) although my Opthamalogist (specialist quack not Optometist or Optician) tells me it’s like colour blindness does not change as an adult.

  8. There are cheap or free smartphone apps which purport to measure your PD using the phone’s camera. Worryingly, the two I tried gave widely differing results.

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