This is not a book about advertising

So start buying. Its a great book, well worth buying for wives, husbands, girlfriends, boyfriends, mistresses, mother-in-laws, toy-boys, family, friends, pets, total strangers you meet in the street, or any combinations of the above. Its great for Christmas, holiday reading, birthdays, Mother’s day, Father’s day, any day.

Honestly I don’t really care why you buy it, what’s important is that you do buy it, preferably multiple copies, often!

Fortunate really, as the advertising campaign could do with a touch of work…..

14 thoughts on “This is not a book about advertising”

  1. Surreptitious Evil: Yes I just don’t get publisher’s pricing policy. They don’t seem to get the idea that demand curves slope downwards. Still really rich buggers like Tim will still be able to afford a few copies!!!

    thersa: Had missed that. Will correct. Thanks.

  2. Can a Moslem have mothers-in-laws?

    No, because there is only one law and that is Sharia.

    (Yes, I know there are the “four schools” – well, actually, seven major ones and an endless profusion of minor ones but …)

  3. Still really rich buggers like Tim will still be able to afford a few copies!!!

    1. Multiple exclamation marks are the sign of a diseased mind. But you’re an economist. So, superfluous 😉

    2. Does your publisher take payment in scandium nuggets?

  4. From Mr Tydfil’s link:

    “Grape harvesters at that time cost $100,000 to $200,000 each”

    That won’t matter much: time was, farmers used to buy their own seasonal machinery such as combine harvesters and forage harvesters. Then contractors started buying the capital intensive machinery and going farm to farm, charging by the hour. Then technology (GPS, mainly) changed and they could charge by the acre, giving them an incentive to get the fields done as fast as possible (hence the JCB Fastrac, capable of 40mph on roads) even working long into the night under spotlights. Nowadays only the largest farms buy the most expensive machinery, for the rest they hire contractors who can pay back the capital cost of the machinery in a season or two. I am sure this will be the model for grape harvesting, assuming it isn’t already.

  5. I’ve never understood what arable farmers do all year.

    Where I grew up we had mixed farming: the animals kept you busy all year long.

    But what does an East Anglian barley baron actually do? He presumably organises contractors to plough and harrow the fields, and then to sow, and eventually to reap. They spread the pesticides and herbicides too, I imagine. Presumably he might spend some time clearing his ditches, or is that done by a contractor too?

    Apart from counting his Eurosubsidies, what does he do?

  6. But what does an East Anglian barley baron actually do? He presumably organises contractors to plough and harrow the fields, and then to sow, and eventually to reap. They spread the pesticides and herbicides too, I imagine.

    Nah, contractors don’t do that stuff. Maybe some disc-harrowing and ploughing, but not so much. I don’t think they do any sowing, but I’ve been out of this world for a long time now. Harvesting, definitely: the equipment is much more expensive and transportation of the crop is necessary.

    Apart from counting his Eurosubsidies, what does he do?

    Grows the seed crops, fixes machinery. I’m not sure what happens to the land in winter if the farm is not mixed: on the mixed farm I knew, you’d stick livestock on it or plant winter vegetables (like sprouts). They’d keep you plenty busy.

  7. Here in New Zealand I had an student once who said he came from England. I asked him what this family did. They were farmers he said. What did they farm I asked. He thought for a moment and then replied, “subsidies mainly”.

    So I’m guessing your barley baron won’t be too happy with the Brexit vote. In time his Eurosubsidies will go.

  8. “I’m not sure what happens to the land in winter if the farm is not mixed”: much of the corn is sown in the autumn, so unless they are rotating crops, it’s under barley or wheat all winter.

  9. The land has to be farmed in order to attract the subsidy, the subsidy was paid to the landowner, the landowner might pass on the subsidy to the tenant but then rent will carry a premium.
    The EU is pushing to change the payments system whereby it would be the person farming who got paid.
    Big landowners (such as Muller) were in favour of Brexit for good reason.

  10. much of the corn is sown in the autumn, so unless they are rotating crops, it’s under barley or wheat all winter.

    Are you sure about that? I seem to remember it being sown in winter and spring. I might be wrong though. I was more interested in the tractors and machinery than crops and animals.

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