Bit of a problem for the Curajus State here

Then there is Theresa May of whom we discovered a willingness to pursue a policy that is without an evidential basis, which she’s likely to lose in the Lords, and maybe even the Commons, and whose appeal is to a very narrow group who were always likely to vote for herparty anyway. This reveals that politicians are irrational human beings with limited intellectual capacity and subject to a lack of discernment that distinguishes what’s right for us in particular from what is right for society at large like too many if the rest of us.

This is, recall, the man who wants those irrational human beings of limited intellectual capacity subject to a lack of discernment to have ever greater power over and control of our lives.

Methinks the man might simply be a cock.

33 thoughts on “Bit of a problem for the Curajus State here”

  1. I would say it’s a case of Murphy Jumping the shark but he did that the better part of 6 years ago (at least) – I do think his stress levels will most likely cause a major health issue before the end of the year, which while not wishing ill on anyone might be best for all concerned, not least his family….

  2. He really is going ga-ga.

    From postings on how Grammar Schools had a bad effect on his life (er, it was Ritchie that was successful(*), the twin who became a local radio DJ) to praising Clinton today, while 8 years ago dismissing her as the wife of a tax haven advising male.

    (*) by his own CV

  3. I’m predicting a sort of figurative Mr Creosote explosion – Murphy’s monstrous ego can’t keep expanding at the rate it has been without consequences.

    And on that blog, I see PSR posted a comment along the lines of “Now I’m not racist but”

    “Ms Kuenssberg would be better off working at Hello! magazine in my view and the quicker she makes that move the better.

    And I’m no misogynist by the way”

  4. “This reveals that politicians are irrational human beings with limited intellectual capacity and subject to a lack of discernment”

    Splutter

  5. “Limited intellectual capacity” – is that because he thinks his own is infinite, whereas it’s just too limited to see the implications of its own output?

  6. Noel

    I think I recall a thread, about the time of the referendum, where the great Murph was extolling the virtues of the EU – having excoriated their actions viz-a-viz Greece only weeks before – where he seemed to claim that he had witnessed the harmful effects of the 11 plus exam and somehow linking this into the peace that the EU had conferred over the continent of Europe since its formation. Rocco Siffredi pointed out the Kosovo war and various incursions by Russia into the Ukraine only to be dismissed by the great Murphmeister saying that Kosovo was not part of the EU at the time.

    Cognitive dissonance is his normal state of affairs. Why should variations in the level of his dissonance presage any disaster? His mind can contain multitudes of totally incompatible viewpoints at all times.

  7. @Ken

    “Grammar schools are popular.

    Not sure whether they are good – evidence is mixed.”

    Jawohl, but surely it doesn’t matter whether they are any good (and wouldn’t it vary by school anyway?)- if its what people want, why not give it to them?

  8. ‘Cameron has just resigned as an MP.’

    Epic sulk. We took the fucker’s ball off him and now he’s going home.

  9. John Square

    The MPs are there not to deliver what people want, but to represent the people and deliver good government. If we did what the people wanted, we’d have capital punishment. A government should be trying to make the most of the resources it uses. The analysis of whether grammar schools are good is based on an analysis of many grammar schools taken together.

    The negative case can be seen here:

    http://blogs.ft.com/ftdata/2013/01/28/grammar-school-myths/

    But, Chris Cook is actually controlling for factors that might be endogenous to the choice of grammar vs. comp:

    http://educationdatalab.org.uk/2015/08/do-grammar-schools-boost-the-performance-of-primary-schools/

    Which is to say that primary school performance is better as a result of being in a grammar area. Evidence is mixed. FWIW the IFS is against

    https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/8469

  10. Ken: If we did what the people wanted, we’d have capital punishment.

    That’s fascinating on two counts. First that you appear to be visiting from the green benches which is brave and second that you seem to consider the people’s support for capital punishment to be entirely aberrant.

    Taking the two things together, my guess is that you must be either David Lamy or Owen Smith.

  11. ‘If we did what the people wanted, we’d have capital punishment.’

    The only thing worse than rule by the masses of the mob is rule by a minority-sized mob with guns and jails to back them up.

    I’m personally against capital punishment, but I’m not aware of any obvious reason why my particular view of what is right should hold sway over my fellows. I actually have quite a lot of faith in my fellows, to be honest – not as individuals, but en masse. And once a minority votes down the majority – where do you stop? Brexit is doomed, for starters.

    I’m aware of argumentum ad mob rule, but it used to be that we could rely (to an extent) on politicians to act in something a bit like the national interest. But things have changed. Profumo fucked off and did charity work for the rest of his life – Vaz is already wangling for a way back to the trough.

    Now that it’s basically almost entirely about what they and their chosen special interest groups can screw out of the rest of us it really amounts to nothing better than mob rule. At least if I’m part of the mob I get a say.

  12. Bloke in Costa Rica

    No, he passed them and went to a grammar school. His twin (brother? sister?) did not. So that is the source of the bitterness about it.

    In fairness, you’d see the starkness of it all when one twin gets in, the other doesn’t, and that sets them on different paths in life. But that’s life.

  13. “In fairness, you’d see the starkness of it all when one twin gets in, the other doesn’t, and that sets them on different paths in life. But that’s life.”

    Luckily that problem doesn’t occur under the current selective system. Daddy buys an expensive house in an area with a very good school, so both twins are now eligible. None of that unfair “he’s not bright enough” nonsense.

  14. @Ken

    Others have said it, but:
    “The MPs are there not to deliver what people want, but to represent the people and deliver good government.”

    I accept that mob rule is one end of the scale, but the will of the people should be represented through parliament.

    If you take capital punishment as an eg, if that’s what the electorate want, they should get it. Ensuring it is applied rationally, with checks and balances is the ‘job’, if you like

  15. “By all accounts the twin is passably normal. So maybe that’s an argument against grammars.”

    Or an argument in favour of the good twin/evil twin theory.

  16. Capital punishment is a huge problem. Who trusts the Curajus State enough to give the tossers power over life and death? Not me.

  17. Bloke in North Dorset

    “Then there is Theresa May of whom we discovered a willingness to pursue a policy that is without an evidential basis,”

    This from a man who’s blog is an evidence, data and citation free zone. Is he trying to give us a new definition of chutzpah?

    MPs are representatives not delegates, that’s our defence against mob rule.

  18. @ BC
    The argument over Capital punishment in the UK is not over the “right” of the Corajus State to execute anyone failing to adhere to today’s version of the party line but over whether a small minority of murderers should be eligible for a relatively humane form of execution to prevent them killing again. It was demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt during the period of “suspension” of capital punishment that the death sentence was an effective deterrent (statistically significant at the 0.00001% level) – and the increase in the number of innocent people being killed in the narrowly defined category of “capital murder” in four years was several times the number of guilty murderers executed in the previous seventeen years (when I looked data was not available for periods prior to 1951). [There were no innocent men executed in that period- DNA evidence refuted the claim that Hanratty was innocent].
    You are entitled to hold the view that no murderers should be executed, and to fear the brutality and disregard for justice of a communist dictatorship, but I think that we should also care about the far greater number of innocents murdered thanks to Woy Jenkins – oh, I take it for granted that the Curajus State wouldn’t wait until they could give me a show trial in case I told the truth in front of the cameras.

  19. @BC

    We used to think the justice system held sway over the establishment of guilt, with the jury making the decision.
    But the Stephen Lawrence case seems to have ended that.
    So I’m inclined to agree with you.

  20. BC – “Capital punishment is a huge problem. Who trusts the Curajus State enough to give the tossers power over life and death? Not me.”

    You may not have noticed it but the State does have power over life and death. Policemen have guns. Or at least are backed up by people with guns. They have batons. They can and do shoot or beat people to death. All the time. Security guards are increasingly moving in that way as well. It is impossible to change this situation. The world is full of bad people and if you walk into the Natural History museum and persistently remove a dinosaur leg you can reasonably expect to die.

    The question is whether or not the state should be allowed to execute after a jury has thought about it. As opposed to beating some random man to death because he was carrying a table leg or something.

  21. bloke in spain – “We used to think the justice system held sway over the establishment of guilt, with the jury making the decision. But the Stephen Lawrence case seems to have ended that. So I’m inclined to agree with you.”

    Indeed. The accused men could not be picked out of a line up. They could not be convicted the first time. Or the second time. They were bugged and secretly filmed for over a year but not a single incriminating statement was produced. Although it was made clear they did not like Black people when the footage was leaked to pollute the jury pool. It was only after the law was changed and the Daily Mail’s hate campaign – and the police switched labs to a commercial operation – that “microscopic” pieces of blood were “found” years after the event.

    There is no reason to think the thugs in prison for his murder did it.

    However the problem is the SJWs who run the legal system. This is what we get instead of capital punishment. We need to get rid of the fainting sisters who are screwing things up and put the system back in the hands of people capable of rational and sustained thought.

  22. ‘We need to get rid of the fainting sisters who are screwing things up and put the system back in the hands of people capable of rational and sustained thought.’

    Needs to be emblazoned across the entrance to Parliament, and given some of Tim’s later posts about ‘the need for a feminist internet’ and the obvious calamities caused by radical feminism, do we need to examine the 1918 Representation of The Peoples Act and qualify the franchise. And indeed, I would argue many men on the political Left are not fit to have the vote either….

  23. I’m a Heinlein fan. The book Starship Troopers – to get the vote people had to earn it. By service.
    Long and maybe dangerous service – but once they had finished their term of service they darn well knew what they had paid for the right to vote.

    There are worse systems of deciding who should vote. We don’t even have all adults age 18+ here in the UK.

  24. I hear all of the arguments in favour of capital punishment and, in many cases, I would shoot the fucker myself, but …….

  25. And SMFS, I enjoy your contributions, generally, but you can be quite patronising. Some of us do notice the obvious things you point out. We might think that the fact that they can kill us doesn’t justify their ‘right’ to do so.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *