But does it actually clean the air in the end?

Dutch inventors have unveiled what they called the world’s first giant outside air vacuum cleaner – a large purifying system intended to filter out toxic tiny particles from the atmosphere surrounding the machine.

“It’s a large industrial filter about eight metres long, made of steel … placed basically on top of buildings and it works like a big vacuum cleaner,” said Henk Boersen, a spokesman for the Envinity Group which unveiled the system in Amsterdam.

How much power does it use, what’s the power source and the emissions from the generation of that power?

20 thoughts on “But does it actually clean the air in the end?”

  1. “It’s a large industrial filter about eight metres long, made of steel … placed basically on top of buildings and it works like a big vacuum cleaner,” said Henk Boersen, a spokesman for the Envinity Group which unveiled the system in Amsterdam.

    Was he addressing a group of retarded children? Or environmentalists?

  2. Yes, those are the questions to ask.

    The only justification I could see would be if its use in heavily polluted areas alleviated the pollution there and the pollution was diluted elsewhere with less dangerous particles in the atmosphere.

    In any case, it is treating the symptoms.

  3. Bloke in North Dorset

    “Was he addressing a group of retarded children? Or environmentalists?”

    How do you tell the difference?

  4. Bloke in North Dorset

    “I might get one to filter out the paragliders who fly illegally over our house.”

    Do you own the airspace over your property in Aus?

  5. Isn’t this why they planted so many London plane trees? The bark captures partials and then falls off – purifying the air around it.

    Can’t they just plant some of these (or similar native sycamore / plane trees)? Much nicer looking and require less electricity.

  6. BiND,

    No, but for safety reasons there are restrictions on how close they can fly to houses and people. Also, take-off and landing areas must be licensed. There is no licensed take-off near us and they land on the beach where families are playing. We had one very seriously injured and another damaged our neighbour’s property when he crash landed. There is a licensed take-off about 45 minutes drive away, but the gits would rather fly over people’s houses and pose a risk to people on the ground.

  7. BiND:

    “Was he addressing a group of retarded children? Or environmentalists?”

    How do you tell the difference?

    As a rule the retarded children will be smaller and have smooth skin.

    However, “Syrian refugee” children (retarded or otherwise) are indistinguishable from environmentalists since both are equally tall and have beards.

  8. Whilst looking at the article Tim mentioned, I saw a link to an article headed:-

    “Air pollution more deadly in Africa than malnutrition or dirty water, study warns”

    I seriously doubt that, in fact I’d call it an outright lie, but you just know the usual suspects are going to try and deny dark people the benefit of mobility. Deadly virtue signalling.

  9. the gits would rather fly over people’s houses and pose a risk to people on the ground.

    How high are you allowed to raise antennas without a permit?

    Alternatively a few barrage balloons dotted around the neighbourhood should sort out the paragliders.

  10. Andrew M, there was a picture doing the rounds a while ago where someone had set up both ends of the air conditioning in the same room.

  11. Ian Reid

    “Air pollution more deadly in Africa than malnutrition or dirty water, study warns”

    It may well be true, if what they are talking about is the smoke from cooking fires and that cooking mostly taking place indoors. I’m an enthusiastic smoker, but, during my Africa days, I couldn’t spend longer than about five minutes inside the average hut before my eyes were watering like an onion peeler’s and my lungs were rasping. Not good for the respiratory system at all.

  12. Physics.

    Since it will lower the air pressure in the vicinity of the machine, the air it filters will instantly be replaced by more particle filled air. (That problem Nature has with vacuums.)

    Since it cannot possibly remove particles faster than they are added, and the atmosphere is loaded with them already, there will still constantly be particle filled air in the area, therefore it will have no benefit whatsoever.

    On the positve side, if they place a wind turbine in the exhausted air stream…

    As with solar and wind generated electricity, it all sounds marvellous if you ignore physics.

  13. @recusant
    They’re not talking about air from fires though. From the article:-

    “While most major environmental hazards have been improving with development gains and industrialisation, outdoor (or “ambient particulate”) air pollution from traffic, power generation and industries is increasing rapidly, especially in fast-developing countries such as Egypt, South Africa, Ethiopia and Nigeria.”

  14. Great idea, I’d like to order a couple for our houses of parliament. Back in the days when I still believed the global warming guff I experimented with a little cryogenic pump that chilled a cubic meter of air at a time down to minus 70°C at which point CO2 precipitates. The amount of particulate matter that also precipitated was an eye-opener. And we breathe this stuff.

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