Idiot fucking stupidity from the Mail over Apple pricing

Apple fans in the UK are once again being hit in the pocket after the tech giant announced prices for its new laptop.
The company’s latest range of notebooks were announced on Thursday, with the cheapest option coming in at £1,449 in Britain and $1,499 in the US.
The pricing means customers in the UK will pay £218 more than their American counterparts after converting the two currencies.
A 13-inch notebook with the new Touch Bar feature starts at £1,749 in the UK, compared to $1,799 in the States, making it £272 cheaper across the pond.

Well, err, um, isn’t this normal? The Mail even manages to get halfway to the answer:

The majority of American buyers will pay slightly closer to the UK price due to many states putting a sales tax on top of the price.
In New York for example, where the sales tax is 8.875 per cent, customers would only be saving £50 compared to their British counterparts.

Err, yes. US prices are quoted exclusive of sales tax, UK prices are quoted inclusive of VAT. No, they don’t manage to mention this. But Apple’s own page does:

2.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor
Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz
8GB 1866MHz memory
256GB PCIe-based SSD1
Intel Iris Graphics 540
Two Thunderbolt 3 ports
£1,449.00
Includes VAT of approx. £242.00.*

Twats.

43 thoughts on “Idiot fucking stupidity from the Mail over Apple pricing”

  1. The great thing is that UK can buy one duty free at the airport and avoid the tax. I checked with an iPad Pro and found that DIxons reduced the price by 20 quid instead of 140! Bought it in HK instead…

  2. @Mark T
    There is no duty free at UK airports. There is a chain shop named “WorldDutyFree” but one can name one’s shop what one wishes to, just like R. Murphy names his blog “Tax Research” when it is nothing of the sort.

    Since domestic, EU, EEA and non-EEA passengers are all mixed together in UK airport departures, retailers must charge a single price to all passengers, however, for those passengers who present a boarding pass for a non-EU destination, the retailer does not remit the VAT to HMRC but keeps it for itself. By doing so, it may manage to increase its revenues by perhaps half of the total VAT that would otherwise be charged, yet, overheads in airports are much higher than (loss-making) retailers with low overheads such as Amazon.

    A GBP earner buying something in Hong Kong at this point in time is silly (unless the GBP earner has savings in USD or HKD), as pricing of most goods in the UK has not yet adjusted to take into account the 15-20% fall in GBP versus the USD, therefore, the price of goods without any sales tax in HK has gone up for a GBP spender by the amount of VAT anyway and one might as well make use of the better UK credit card and consumer protections.

  3. The real story is that Apple are charging 300 quid for the Touch Bar it seems (minus whatever other extra features the expensive one has).

    They could rant about that instead, even if they’d still be wrong.

  4. The other story is that Britain is a rip-off and always has been. Why does pretty much everything cost so much less in the US? Because in the US the customers will kick up fuck and/or not buy something, whereas the British are famous for grumbling like hell but forking out anyway.

  5. Jack C,

    I really do think Apple have lost it. Apple have just released a brand new phone and a brand new Macbook Pro, and you can’t charge the phone from the Pro without an adaptor. The new high quality audio they put into the iPhone isn’t in the Pro. Headphone connector? It’s still there in the Macbook Pro, but there isn’t a lightning connector, which is the only headphone socket on the iPhone. Steve Jobs would have turned into Keyser Soze for this level of crapness.

    The biggest facepalm to me was showing emojis in the bar. This is a goddamn Macbook Pro, not a Macbook for poseurs in Starbucks. It’s what developers at Google use to write Unix code, what graphic designers run Photoshop on. And they’ve removed a bunch of things those people like, like real keys, USB ports and ethernet ports. No-one in my twitter timeline that uses Macs is at all impressed.

  6. The tone of Tim’s comments imply criticism of the Mail, a veritable national treasure.
    After supporting Oswald Mosley briefly, it has since redeemed itself post war by steadfastly screeching : if average house prices were £1 mill we’d all be millionaires.Except the low-life renter scum.And council house scum though Mrs Thatcher fixed them real good with some true blue British bribery, all the more effective for being slathered in hypocrisy .
    We’ve had fifty years of this Homeownerism Daily Mail style. Wouldn’t you think its time to try something else, something a shade more grown-up?

  7. It’s what developers at Google use to write Unix code

    Not just at Google. I’m not looking forward to using vi on one, given the lack of ESC key.

  8. My local Ford stealership here in Melbourne demands $400 AUD + GST for a single back hub/wheel bearing assembly for a 2012 Mondeo.

    The same part is 35 quid plus 30 delivery from UK EBay

    The same bunch of funts who insisted with a straight face that consumer interests would not be served if the parallel importing ban was repealed. The tax eaters in Canberra acquiesced

  9. “DBC Reed

    Wouldn’t you think its time to try something else, something a shade more grown-up?”

    Why not give it a go?

  10. The idiot stupidity is simpler than a misunderstanding over taxes. Apple don’t set a price in the UK relative to other countries. They set a price to what they think the locals will pay for it. If the locals are mugs, and they are, they will pay.

    Why, soon the Mail may notice that a semi in London costs three times as much as a semi 50 miles away! Will they be outraged? No. They will be fucking amazed and delighted.

    Surely they cannot be as stupid as this?

  11. I’m not looking forward to using vi on one, given the lack of ESC key.

    That’s hideous even on a standard keyboard. How the fuck that monstrosity has survived is amazing.

  12. I don’t know if this has been said before, but it’s no coincidence that ‘vi’ is the heart of the word ‘evil’.

  13. Rob – even Emacs fans need an Esc key. As for Vi on the new Overpriced-iPad-with-a-horrible-keyboard, I suppose you could remap the Caps Lock key. But since the new MacBook Pros have the butterfly key mechanism first seen with the 12″ MacBook, which is generally disliked even by fanbois, now might be a good time to wean oneself off macOS/OS X and revert to something sensible for getting work done, such as Linux, provided it’ll run the software you need.

    Interesting that no news is emanating from Cupertino about their other computers, i.e. the Pro, iMac and Mini, all of which are looking extremely tired. Their heart just isn’t in it any more; Mac revenues are dwarfed by what they make from phones.

  14. Thomas Fuller,

    Take a look at Thinkpads. Solid, excellent machines and they’re well regarded for Linux support.

    And for what Linux is missing, you could easily run the rest in a Windows VM .

    My guess is the Hackintosh market is about to go crazy, though.

  15. “you can’t charge the phone from the Pro without an adaptor. ”
    I’d have presumed that was a feature. If you own both, you get the opportunity to pay extra for the accessory. At full, Apple Shop, retail of course. Because no self respecting Macperson would dream of picking up a clone on ebay. For isn’t the point of Macputing & Macfoning to do everything everybody else does at four times the cost. And, most importantly. For everyone to know it’s being done at four times the cost. Hence those “Sent from my Iphone” & “Sent from my Ipad” boasts* get appended too e-mails.

    *I do value those. As soon as I see them I know the bloke’s a cunt. Vital pre-meeting information.

  16. > After supporting Oswald Mosley briefly

    Guardian-readers always bring this up, like I’m supposed to care. A newspaper, like any other organisation, is comprised of people. All the people who supported Mosley are dead, or nearly. None of them are writing for The Mail.

    The Mail, in fact, can be relied upon to notice and call out and condemn antisemitism, everywhere, all the time, without equivocation.

    The Guardian, on the other hand, supported the USSR right up to 1987, and can be relied upon to contain antisemitism every single fucking day.

  17. @Joe Blow

    “My local Ford stealership here in Melbourne demands $400 AUD + GST for a single back hub/wheel bearing assembly for a 2012 Mondeo.

    The same part is 35 quid plus 30 delivery from UK EBay”

    The difference there is that a £35 Ebay mondeo wheel bearing will be made from a particularly soft batch of cottage cheese and will last about 20 minutes (if it holds together at all)

    A quick search at my usual supplier has a rear wheel bearing kit for a 2012 Mondeo at £175 (I can usually get a decent discount off the list price).

    Never, ever buy anything safety critical for a car from ebay

  18. The Guardian, on the other hand, supported the USSR right up to 1987, and can be relied upon to contain antisemitism every single fucking day.

    And once Ho-Chi Milne gets back, it will be right up Kim Jong Un’s rectum, again. And possibly even Maduro’s, though the Gruniard editorial team seem to have damped the man-love Jones has for the human face of the disaster.

  19. I used to be a Mac fan. Many years ago, they made better machines with a better operating system than the competition. As they became more popular, they started making overpriced crap. And their influence forced Microsoft to up their game in the OS stakes.

    I’ve had a Surface Pro for a couple of years. It is a really really damn nice machine. It’s the sort of thing Apple would have made once upon a time but don’t any more.

    The New Surface Studio looks interesting. A square aim at Apple’s core market, there. And a bloody good aim, looks like. The Dial is bloody cool. I’d be amazed if every DAW maker on the planet hasn’t already started thinking of ways to integrate it.

    Interesting thing about the Surface was the way it was derided as a flop when it first launched. Apple have built so much of their reputation around the business plan of launching a product and selling a bazillion inside a week that the entire tech industry has decided that that’s the only way to do things. Microsoft took a completely different approach: launch something quite cool, watch it to see how it does, listen to feedback, tweak, repeat. They were quite open about not caring whether the Surface made a profit in its first couple of years. They didn’t care when they had to write down a load of inventory. They didn’t abandon the project. Just kept tweaking. And now the Surface is considered a cool and desirable machine, just like a Mac. I find it has wow factor, too: when geeks see me using one, they ask to have a look.

    I’m glad Microsoft succeeded in this way — not just because I like my Surface, but because, even if I didn’t, I think it’s healthy for the industry to be reminded that a successful gadget doesn’t have to go from nothing to everywhere overnight.

  20. bloke in spain,

    Well, yes and no. The poseurs in Starbucks don’t care. They’ll buy garbage like Macbooks because they look pretty for stuff they could use a cheapo Dell for just as well.

    But the Macbook Pro is more of a serious tool. People buy them because they’re well-engineered, powerful, lightweight machines. And they’re of particular interest to people like open source developers because it’s based on BSD UNIX and they’re deploying to Linux servers. I even know people with MBPs who just run Windows on them because they like the hardware.

  21. BiW

    I can concur with your point about poseurs. I work in IT, and I haven’t recently encountered an honest operational reason why a Mac was needed for the job that a cheaper PC couldn’t do. Those things do seem to be something of a Veblen Good.

    Thinking back to my early days, it is possible that some software was only out for Macs… I think perhaps Quark or some of the Adobe stuff… but this is going way back, I can’t clearly remember. But the same Adobe products have been sold for Windows and Mac for a long time now.

    Yet we still get people insisting they absolutely must have a Mac.

  22. Squander Two,

    Yeah, Surface stuff is everywhere. A client of mine loves his pro setup – tablet for meetings, but back in the office, he plugs it in and it docks with all the stuff to make a workstation. I used to see iPads for that sort of thing, but Surface seems to be taking over.

  23. > After supporting Oswald Mosley briefly

    Guardian-readers always bring this up, like I’m supposed to care. A newspaper, like any other organisation, is comprised of people. All the people who supported Mosley are dead, or nearly. None of them are writing for The Mail.

    Would that be the same Oswald Mosley that was a fucking Labour minister under Ramsay MacDonald?

  24. I feel old. I still use a desktop that I built myself in 2008 and, like Trigger’s broom, has had most of itself upgraded since then. If you don’t need the portability then a standard desktop does a much better job than a laptop in my experience. The iPad is handy for surfing the internet, checking emails, and watching films on and not much else.

  25. Take a look at Thinkpads. Solid, excellent machines and they’re well regarded for Linux support.

    Was definitely true when IBM owned the brand. It became less true after Lenovo took over – which was when I switched from ThinkPads to Macbook Pros.

    Have Lenovo sorted out the incompatible hardware now? I see some are listed as ‘certified’ for Ubuntu 14.04LTS and RHEL7 but have no idea if those are current models.

  26. @S2/Tim Newman,

    I concur with the views on the iPad- I genuinely like the current iPad mini, but they are toys. The surface pro looks like the only serious tablet convertible out there.

    The only things I really *like* about Apple products these days is the iOS integration (texts, calls on laptop and tethering to the iPhone) and the size and battery life of the air.

    Mind you, Id take any MacBook over the Dell work has given me.

  27. Would that be the same Oswald Mosley that was a fucking Labour minister under Ramsay MacDonald?

    Yep. It’s the same selective amnesia the Left apply to the racist South in the USA – when it was racist, it was overwhelmingly Democrat.

    Young fools today just assume they are, and always have been Republicans coz Republicans are right-wing and evil, aren’t they?

  28. @ TimN
    Since I seem to have, geographically, come to rest for a while I’ve been looking at building another box myself. First one got put together in ’98 & sufficed for a dozen years at something like 30 quid a year including upgrades. And it’ll be Linux. Because it seems one only needs all this hyperfast processing capability & voluminous memory to enable the abortion that the Windows O/S has become. The load actually doing anything puts on the system is minuscule in comparison.

  29. “Would that be the same Oswald Mosley that was a fucking Labour minister under Ramsay MacDonald?”

    It was, I believe, Oswald Mosley who said “vote Labour, sleep conservative”.

    His view being that the further to the right a women’s politics, the dirtier in bed she was. My own experience does tend to support that.

  30. @ AndrewC
    So, basically, Mosely O was only after kinky sex with dominant women. I wonder if it’s possible to inherit the genes for that?

  31. Don’t knock the cheapo Dell.
    Wife’s old laptop from 1999 is a Dell, she still does some word processing on it along with photo editing from her camera.
    Nice cheapo laptop back then, can get them cheaper these days of course but the newer ones won’t run Diablo game. 🙂

  32. Dell keep their price down by constantly updating the source of the internal components depending on price. Fair enough, but it makes their quality highly variable. Take a batch of supposedly identical Dells with the same specs on paper, and some can last for years with no problem while the others need to be repaired every six months. Trouble is, it’s impossible to know when buying them which you’re going to get.

  33. Dunno about y’all, but when I use my (rather old)13″ MacBook Pro for actual work, I hook up an external keyboard, mouse and monitor. So I really wouldn’t care very much if the ESC key went missing on the machine’s keyboard.

    And the heck with six. It’s a stupid name, too, even for us Latin scholars. TextWrangler or BBEdit or (for supported languages) XCode…

  34. Good point, Squander Two.

    It also makes doing standard clone images for corporate use a pain, as the same model isn’t always the same bloody model.

    (for non-techies, it means we build the machine with OS, software and drivers once, make a file [image”] of that machine’s hard drive, then use that file to clone the same build to hundreds of identical machines, just changing the name of each clone. Saves stacks of time, allowing us to completely install a PC, or many, in just a few minutes.)

  35. Squander Two,

    “Guardian-readers always bring this up, like I’m supposed to care. A newspaper, like any other organisation, is comprised of people. All the people who supported Mosley are dead, or nearly. None of them are writing for The Mail.”

    It’s also worthy of note that the Daily Mirror also, briefly supported the Blackshirts at the same time and in 1934 said of Germany and Italy that anyone visiting “would find that the mood of the vast majority of their inhabitants was not cowed submission but confident enthusiasm.”

    We cannot see through the eyes of people 80 years ago. Faced with threats of communism (which had shown itself to be murderous for decades), and fascism, a fairly new ideology that was going to stand against it and in 1934 had done little, which option would you consider the lesser of two evils?

    It’s easy to be wise about Hitler now, that we probably should have given him a kicking when he increased the size of the army or marched into the Rhineland, but we didn’t. We’d lost a million young men in living memory in a war and no-one wanted to do it again.

  36. During the 1920s and early 1930s Mussolini was internationally admired as the man who had revived Italy. His policies were so popular that Franklin Roosevelt incorporated them almost word-for-word into his National Industrial Recovery Act. This is something else that Progressives have conveniently forgotten.

  37. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I’m surprised DBC Retard is so down on fascism. I would thought it would be right up his alley. A bit of bash the bankers (Yids, the lot of ’em, apparently), some Blut und Boden, snazzy uniforms, what’s not to like?

  38. The FT is doing something similar: you can fly to Canada with Westjet(!) and still save money! It does seem that the article has failed to account for: GST is added to the CA list price afterwards, just like US sales tax; the EU’s customs union only allows £390 worth of tax-paid goods; above £390 you pay duty+VAT on the whole (not just the bit above the allowance); and the VAT applies to the duty too (ie, price+duty). That would be the EU’s “own resources” then.

  39. – “…the Mail, a veritable national treasure.After supporting Oswald Mosley briefly…”

    A very regrettable dalliance with leftism which I’m sure we all hope is never to be repeated.

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