Isn’t this just absolutely wonderful?

The number of Britons seeking citizenship in other EU countries has surged as a result of the Brexit vote, with some member states recording near tenfold increases on 2015 figures.

Denmark, Italy, Ireland and Sweden have all reported a spike in applications from British citizens eager to secure proper status in the EU following the 23 June vote that has set the UK on course to leave.

Across 18 European countries, at least 2,800 Britons applied for citizenship in the first eight months of 2016 – a more than 250% increase on numbers recorded in 2015. Compared with last year’s figures, numbers have surged almost tenfold in Denmark and threefold in Sweden.

Several applicants told the Guardian that it was the Brexit vote that prompted them to take action.

Those who wish to remain EU citizens can, those who do not so wish do not. This is an increase in liberty and freedom and as such is to be welcomed.

And, of course, the federasts are now self-sorting out of the UK.

91 thoughts on “Isn’t this just absolutely wonderful?”

  1. Hardly qualifies as new. 2800 is a trivial total and most will be long term residents who wish to guarantee their residency by taking action while UK is still in the EU.

  2. @Aidan, by definition all will be long-term residents who are now eligable for citizenship.

    However, the scaremongering is resutlting in this. For instance, I now have the Swiss equivalent of indefinite leave to remain. Even though my residency permit says “EU/EFTA”, legally my permit is unconditional. The only change may be that they take my fingerprints and give me a credit-card sized one like my non-euro wife has instead of the god awful paper one I have now. Oh noes.

  3. Quite a few of those will be Brits living in Britain but with a foreign parent or grandparent who can confer their nationality. Also, the Republic of Ireland will grant Irish nationality to anyone born in Northern Ireland. If anything 2800 sounds low.

  4. I’m assuming that the UK is all enlightened and stuff and allows dual citizenship? In which case they’re not actually leaving. More’s the pity.

  5. Ltw, the UK does allow dual nationality but other countries do not.

    I work in the same office English chap who has lived here in Netherlands for almost 20 years. On June 24th he went absolutely ballistic on the referendum announcement(quote: Hope you’re happy now. UK will become a third world country in 3 years unquote. To which I retorted: 3 years? Have you not been to Luton lately?) Other than his obvious socialist statist political views (which he can well afford as he is an a really good whack), he’s a decent bloke.

    He has applied for Dutch citizenship because, in his words, of Brexit. The Netherlands does not allow for dual nationality and he and his wife will relinquish their British passports.

  6. Bloke in North Dorset

    You would think nobody had lived in another EU country prior to the single market coming in to existence in 1993.

    In 1981 while serving in Celle, Germany, a good friend left the army to live with his Irish girlfriend who was already living there. He had no problems getting a job and integrating. There was a few forms to fill out and I suppose it helped that he had made an effort to learn some German.

  7. Only 2800 have applied ? I can recall breathless reports of the Irish passport office temporarily doubling their staff to accommodate the vast numbers applying post referendum.

  8. To my disgrace, my daughter is now seeking Eire citizenship. But the hoops she is being made to go through are unbelievable.

    She need s to know my first marriage (of 3) date and place of birth, as well as that one’s divorce (and it lasted 6 weeks !), my (genuinely Eire father’s details, his death date and his 2nd marriage date), and lord knows what else. Madness, or do I just say “bureaucracy” ?

  9. Mal Reynolds (Serenity)

    I will at some point be counted amongst them. I can claim Irish citizenship through my grandparents. Not really a big deal, just probably means I avoid a bit of paperwork now and again. I’m not intending to actually move out of the UK though.

  10. Wonderful analysis.

    2800 becomes several.

    That is, more than one but less than 10.

    Or, a number that my calculator expresses as 0.000000% of the population.

  11. Of course this puts me in a difficult position, because it would (living in Italy married to an Italian, and more importantly, having two italian dogs) it would actually make a lot of sense to get Italian dual citizenship but it is obviously impossible to do this without being accused of being a remoaner or a hypocrite.

    Still, could be after December 4th Italy will join us on the outside!!

  12. John Square in Greece

    I’m spending so much time in Greece at the moment it looks like I’m getting an apartment here to save on hotels. The process for getting a place sorted seems painless, and the only Brexit inconvenience to date has been the number of Greeks who are very envious of what we’ve done.

  13. Upon actually reading the article, the 2800 are just the Britons living abroad. It doesn’t count e.g. Britons in the UK applying for Irish nationality.

    But not having to read the full article is why I read Timmy’s digests in the first place.

  14. @Alan Douglas

    That sounds about right “bureaucracy gone mad”.

    I was born in Australia to British parents and have an Australian birth certificate. I grew up in the UK and have held a UK passport since about 1966. A couple of years ago I needed to renew my passport and had to supply (additionally) certified copies of my parents’ birth certificates (b1907 and 1917) and their marriage certificate.

    Bloody inconvenient when you live deep in the darkest reaches of unfashionable Tohoku.

    I am actually qualified to apply for Irish nationality as my grandmother was from Cork. She was one of the well-known Irish L’Estrange family. Or should that be O’L’Estrange? That would give me three passports. What a wheeze!

  15. What percentage of these Remains actually speak a European language? I know of one who couldn’t speak French or German, even pidgin, if his fucking life depended on it. But he’s going to leave the UK, oh yes. Ironically he must be expecting the natives to all speak Englidh to him.

  16. The ones applying to Sweden have an image of Sweden which no longer reflects reality. They’ll get a big shock, especially if they are young and female.

  17. @LTW

    “I’m assuming that the UK is all enlightened and stuff and allows dual citizenship? In which case they’re not actually leaving.”

    Rather idiotically IMO, the UK does allow dual-citizenship i.e hedging your bets.

  18. There are valid reasons for wanting a dual passport.

    Spinning them as propaganda indicates again the need for the left to be smashed.

    Tim you should put a permanent topic at the head of the blog –or a topic that makes an appearance every so often –where commenters can send in their suggestions as to how the scum of CM can be broken in this country and around the globe.

    Whinging maybe enjoyable but if we don’t get into action we may find ourselves whinging as they shut the cattle car door in our faces.

    The better use of brainpower would be to come up with ideas as to how the propagandising slime of socialism can be broken. Since they are the cause of 99% of the problems that now exist in the West and around the world ideas for effective action against them would be a boon to humanity

  19. So Much For Subtlety

    Bloke In Italy – “it would actually make a lot of sense to get Italian dual citizenship but it is obviously impossible to do this without being accused of being a remoaner or a hypocrite.”

    I assume you are not pro-Remain. Nor am I. I wouldn’t have any problems with you applying for an Italian passport. After all, some sensible views in the Italian population can only do them good.

    Although why you would want to live in Northern Somalia escapes me. And it will be.

  20. What’s funny is that a whole lot of people seem to think that you can just apply for another citizenship. Hence the whole “Nigel visits the German embassy, so we’ll speculate that he was applying for citizenship even though he’s clearly not eligable but we’re too dumb to actually google the rules”.

  21. If I was eligible for dual/multiple citizenship I’d get as many as I could. Expect American because of the draconian tax rules.

  22. To be pedantic, I doubt it is predominantly Remainers applying for another citizenship. It is more likely to be a mix of Leavers and Remainers. As it will give travel and work benefits regardless of your political views.

    And to be further pedantic, I doubt that it is very many people at all who have any hope of being able to do this. You kind of need a connection to a country to apply for citizenship. There are only so many Irish descendants, or people who’ve married a European.

    So no, it’s not generally speaking a wonderful way for Remainers to mitigate the consequences.

  23. ISTM mildly odd, that you might be so keen to allow others to join us in Blighty, that you make sure you can leave….

  24. I got dual British/Irish nationality a few years ago because I could. After the referendum result my sister, who is married to a German and lives in Germany, wanted to know how to go about doing the same because she wants to keep her British nationality and remain a EU citizen. She could take German nationality however Germany doesn’t allow dual nationality, so she sees dual British/Irish nationality as the way to go.

  25. @Dongguan John,

    “If I was eligible for dual/multiple citizenship I’d get as many as I could. Expect American because of the draconian tax rules.”

    To be pedantic, US citizenship at birth is not something you are “eligable” for – it is something you either have, or haven’t. Whether there’s documentary proof of it is another matter, but it’s not something you are eligable for and can *claim*.

  26. Dual nationality with countries that don’t allow it is interesting. E.g. If you’re already a Chinese citizen then you could apply for say UK citizenship and as UK allow dual you just don’t tell the Chinese and keep both. But, if you want to join a country that doesn’t allow both I think you need to prove you have renounced your previous country. So it better for people who are from a country that doesn’t allow it than one that does. Germans could probably get dual U.K./Germany citizenship on the quiet but not the other way around.

    Also, Germany, what the fuck? What kind of first world liberal democracy doesn’t allow dual citizenship?

  27. Abacab, yeah I heard about these inadvertent US citizens and did a little research to ensure my mother wasn’t one as her father was an American. Apparently he hadn’t lived in America enough for her to automatically be one… thank God.

  28. @Dongguan John,

    two of the little buggers in my family…

    That’ll be fun in school when it comes to explaining why they can’t have a bank account…

  29. Also, Germany, what the fuck? What kind of first world liberal democracy doesn’t allow dual citizenship?

    Holland doesn’t either (or at least didn’t when I was there). Unless you’re Turkish or Maroccan, which don’t allow renouncing citizenship and so an exception was made.

    Apparently if you kicked up enough of a fuss about the blatant discrimination that this represents they’d allow you to do the same, since it was a massive political can of worms that they wanted to keep as firmly shut as possible.

  30. Quite a few of those will be Brits living in Britain but with a foreign parent or grandparent who can confer their nationality. Also, the Republic of Ireland will grant Irish nationality to anyone born in Northern Ireland. If anything 2800 sounds low.

    Indeed. It says a lot about the Proud Oirish that their main role in Europe is one of handing out passports to people who aren’t Irish.

  31. Aidan, by definition all will be long-term residents who are now eligable for citizenship.

    Not quite: I’ve been resident in France for 3 years, I need 5 to apply for citizenship. I’m hoping a deal is thrashed out whereby I can apply for permanent residency on the spot, but we’ll see.

  32. abacab, I’ve heard of American expats in China being refused bank accounts because the banks can’t be bothered to comply with all the new US rules regarding overseas accounts of US citizens. Easier just to close down old accounts and not allow new ones than play their games or be out the US domestic market.

  33. The Netherlands does not allow for dual nationality and he and his wife will relinquish their British passports.

    Just do what people did years ago: don’t tell anyone you have two passports. True, you’ll not want to get caught with both in your possession, but why would he relinquish his British passport? Just apply for the Dutch one and keep your mouth shut.

  34. Just do what people did years ago: don’t tell anyone you have two passports. True, you’ll not want to get caught with both in your possession, but why would he relinquish his British passport? Just apply for the Dutch one and keep your mouth shut.

    The Dutch will withdraw the granted citizenship if you don’t provide proof of having ditched the earlier one within a certain time limit.

  35. “Just apply for the Dutch one and keep your mouth shut.”

    Can you do so without proof you have renounced your British citizenship?

  36. Oh, and there is nothing stopping you “proving” you have renounced your British citizenship and then marching straight back into a British embassy and applying for a passport. Unless you’ve renounced your birth certificate as well.

  37. The Dutch will withdraw the granted citizenship if you don’t provide proof of having ditched the earlier one within a certain time limit.

    As I said, what does the proof consist of? Is a British consulate going to refuse to issue you a passport on the basis of whatever you’ve done? Historically they didn’t: you just apply as per the usual process.

  38. I always assumed it would be hard to get citizenship back after you told your country to fuck off. Maybe it isn’t then.

  39. The Dutch want to see official documentation from the UK that you have relinquished citizenship.

    Yes but, as I understand it, historically you have been able to walk back into a British embassy and apply for a passport in the normal fashion citing your birthright without the British telling you “Sorry, you’ve relinquished it”. I believe they allowed people to do this because they knew some were being forced to relinquish it in order to gain another (particularly when the US didn’t allow dual-nationality). Nations are surprisingly unwilling to share information and cooperate between one another on this issue.

  40. Ah yes: the link even tells you how to resume your British nationality, and you don’t need to show documentation from your new country other than:

    “an official letter or statement from the country you’re currently a citizen or national of saying that if you hadn’t given up your British citizenship you’d have lost or failed to get your current citizenship or nationality”

    Which presumably you could get at the beginning of the process.

  41. My kids have both German and French passports. Soon to apply for UK as well, being born here and just in case. So am I with 30 odd years residency. Again, just in case.

    The French never asked about other passports, the Germans asked but also said they did not care anyway (and my kids were under instructions to say no).

    As has been said, unless you’re asked specifically to renounce (even then, you would be without passport or nationality until you get the new one, and without the certainty of gaining it so I find that doubtful), I don’t see the point of volunteering information.

  42. I remember when I was younger my Aunt had an Australian passport and a British one. She said that Australia didn’t allow dual nationality, but they only asked/checked when you applied, so let both run out, apply for a new Australian passport and you don’t have any other passport (and can honestly say so on the form). Then once you have it, you can apply for the British one.

    Wonder if the same trick would work with other places that don’t permit dual-nationality…

  43. Being an American taxpayer has five annoyances:
    1) some banks & brokerages won’t allow you to open an account;
    2) you have to submit a US tax return, even if there’s nothing to pay;
    3) if you earn more than $100,800 you have to pay tax on the excess, unless the country you’re living in already taxes more;
    4) they’ll charge you CGT if you sell your main residence (Boris Johnson was caught by this one);
    5) if you renounce your US green card or citizenship, and you have a net worth of more than $2m, you have to pay capital gains tax on all your assets as if you’d sold them on the day you left.

    Overall it’s not a vast amount of tax; but it’s a horrendous burden of paperwork.

  44. “So it better for people who are from a country that doesn’t allow it than one that does.”

    Indeed, my wife is in this situation. Our children, however, are British, so it might be hard for them to get Korean passports, although I can’t imagine that permanent residency would be an issue. They could however get Swedish citizenship through me, although it might raise an eyebrow that my passport wasn’t renewed a few years ago.

    My mother relinquished her British citizenship when she joined the Swedish diplomatic corps. The British Embassy said something like “don’t worry, if you want your citizenship back let us know and we’ll sort it”. Almost makes you proud to be British!

  45. As a Leaver I was amused to learn as a result of all the media interest in Irish passports that I too would qualify for one. My maternal grandfather was born in Ireland so I could get an Irish passport if I wanted. Might be worth doing one day, always good to have options!

  46. Germany does now allow dual citizenship (but only recently).

    I have a colleague who was born in Canada to a Welsh mother, but who has lived in Germany since he was about 6 months old. His UK passport prevented getting a German one until now.

    Hist first visit to the UK was this year, at the age of 32.

  47. I have a Scottish wife (although she was born in Canada) and a daughter who was born in the USA. If Scotland leaves the UK and joins the EU, then my daughter will have 4 potential nationalities including EU citizenship.

  48. “I always assumed it would be hard to get citizenship back after you told your country to fuck off. Maybe it isn’t then.”

    Several thousand ISIS terrorists are soon going to test that assumption in Europe.

  49. 2800 in eight months, most of whom have already decided to live outside of Britain. Compared with how many non Britons moving here?
    I’ll bet there’s more comings than goings.
    Getting desperate, aren’t they.

  50. @AndrewM,

    There’s more than 5… try FBAR (if you have more than US$10k total in financial assets outside the US, you have to report on the max amount in each account you have signatory authority over, even if it’s not your money subject to life-destroying penalties for mistakes), and the 100k exemption not counting unearned income such as pensions, which in some countries are very lightly taxed if at all. Oh, and gains in pension plans being taxed as unearned income cos they’re not taxed in the country of residence.

    And that’s just the tip of the iceberg there. An American owns 1 of 10 apartments in a block? Then the management structure of the block counts as an American corporation, subject to US reporting and taxation.

  51. @kevins

    Germany does allow dual British German citizenship. I am almost through the process myself (I did have to prove I had renounced another citizenship I used to hold) and know a number of people with both.

  52. @timnthe Germans are definitely getting information from the British authorities regardibg my citizenship application. they know things about me they couldn’t possibly have got by other means.

  53. and the 2800 numerous is too low. it’s over 300 this year just in my corner of Germany, apparently 10 times the usual rate. I wouldn’t be surprised if the figure is out by 2 orders of magnitude.

  54. The problem is that those who are leaving are, self-evidently, the really intelligent, well-informed, fundamentally brighter ones. Those of us staying behind are the dross, the thickies and under-educated bigots.

    Oh well, I’m sure we’ll muddle through somehow.

  55. @BiG

    ‘and the 2800 numerous is too low. it’s over 300 this year just in my corner of Germany, apparently 10 times the usual rate. I wouldn’t be surprised if the figure is out by 2 orders of magnitude.’

    Yoiu think 280,000 Brits are applying for foreign nationality? Tell the Guardian, and the Bremainers – that sounds like a story!

  56. Is Federast the best word to describe them? They are after all, uhm, catchers and not pitchers.

    Is there a proper word for the pederastee?

  57. BiG I wouldn’t be so sure it’s the governments sharing info. An old friend here , years ago, was told by the consulate in Guangzhou that the Chinese were ‘aware of his military service’. His military service being a year or so at some officer cadet scheme at uni. He wasn’t even in China on a proper residence permit.I doubt the UK are sharing this sort of information with the CCP.

    Seems governments while being pretty useless at improving our lives are rather good at finding out details of people living in their country.

  58. @BiG

    I’m sure my sister will be very interested to hear this, she’ll be able to get triple nationality then(?)

  59. All you need to regain (British) citizenship is:

    “an official letter or statement from the country you’re currently a citizen or national of saying that if you hadn’t given up your British citizenship you’d have lost or failed to get your current citizenship or nationality”

    Doesn’t the request for such a letter serve as notice to (in this case, the Dutch) that you are attempting to reestablish your other citizenship? On getting this request (as a Dutch official) my response would be to produce the letter, but give notice that I would need to see the same official confirmation that you had renounced your British citizenship as was originally required on grant of Dutch citizenship, and on the same time frame. The effect would be that you could (in theory) switch between the two, but not hold both at once (other than some overlap periods). I don’t know if in practice, after two or three grants and renunciations, one or the other state wold tell you to fuck off.

  60. Bloke in Germany in England

    @john galt, you fuckwit,

    Inselaffe has a nice ring to it- maybe I will adopt that.

    @KevinS,

    The more the merrier.

  61. I don’t know if in practice, after two or three grants and renunciations, one or the other state wold tell you to fuck off.

    Depends on how you (and the state) view citizenship.

    I’ve switched between phone carriers a dozen times over the last 20 years – none of them have ever been reluctant to take me back as a customer. And that’s how *I* view citizenship – the government is a service provider, not an allegiance.

    If I were jumping between countries then I could understand why any of those governments might be leery of issuing me a security clearance – but if they want my tax revenue . . .

  62. @Jim and others,

    A large percentage of UK born (dare I say it – sod it, yes) white people are eligible for an Irish passport. iirc if a great great grand parent or more recent was Irish, you qualify.

    Having one is useful if you travel to countries hostile with one another, eg Israel and MENA. Alternatively emulate journalists and have two UK passports.
    .

  63. A large percentage of UK born (dare I say it – sod it, yes) white people are eligible for an Irish passport. iirc if a great great grand parent or more recent was Irish, you qualify.

    …Swing and a miss!

    It’s actually if either of your parents or any grandparent was born in the island of Ireland (i.e. includes the 6 provinces of Northern Ireland still under British occupation).

    I know because I applied by this route years ago (i.e. it’s got nothing to do with BRExit)

    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/irish_citizenship/irish_citizenship_through_birth_or_descent.html

  64. Don’t over a 100,000 people a year leave Britain anyway and the number has been rising, so a small % difference overall

  65. Apparently 12.5% of Australian immigrants are from U.K. So for 150,000 a year in total (based on some old figures) that’s 18,000 brits leaving for Australia, Canada is most probably a few thousand on top of that as well

  66. Digging a little deeper 2012/2013 it was 11,720 brits moved to Australia so 1,000 a month, can’t blame that on brexit though

  67. All this is strange. I remember patriotism.
    Nobody traded in their country for another. And plenty died for it.

  68. All this is strange. I remember patriotism.
    Nobody traded in their country for another. And plenty died for it.

    Yes and what was the net result?

    Weak minded fools in Parliament handed us over lock, stock and barrel to Brussels in return for a few vague promises and the opportunity of a cushy job with a nice pension and expense account when voters finally got sick and tired of them and voted them out of office.

    Yes Kinnock et al – I mean you lot.

  69. Rational Anarchist,

    Australia now allows dual citizenship, probably because lots of people chose to remain permanent residents rather than lose their other citizenship. MrsBud and three of the kids are dual citizens. They had no choice, it was that or have to pay international student fees. The only thing they insist on is that they leave Aus on their Aus passports.

    I haven’t bothered, minor inconvenience in having to get re-entry visa every 5 years, but I’m not eligible for jury duty and I don’t have to pay fines for refusing to be compelled to vote.

  70. Doesn’t the request for such a letter serve as notice to (in this case, the Dutch) that you are attempting to reestablish your other citizenship?

    I reckon you’d just use the letter the Dutch sent you telling you to renounce your British citizenship at the start of the process. Either way, I don’t think the Brits would press this point too hard, they’ve usually been quite sympathetic.

  71. On the subject of dual nationalities. My wife is from Colombia and she wanted our child to have dual nationality. The Colombian consulate advised against it, because if she ever went to Colombia on holiday without me, anti child trafficking laws would mean it would be hard for them to come back unless I filled in a lot of paperwork.
    In many ways this is quite depressing, although it is good that if you live in Colombia you can’t just kidnap your kids and go to another country (which could happen here).

  72. I’m getting a Malta passport as I’m entitled, having been married to a Makta citizen for amino mum of five years.

    Some dual nationality issues are problematic. As some has said here, if you have a US passport it creates a nightmare in dealing with the IRS. Many expat Americans can’t get access to bank accounts, a situation worsened by the recent FATCA legislation that created horrendous compliance burdens on banks.

  73. “All this is strange. I remember patriotism.
    Nobody traded in their country for another. And plenty died for it.”

    True. Though they aren’t even trading it – stamping their feet and storming out of the house “forever”, but insisting on taking a key with them.

  74. I remember patriotism…

    That would be back in the good old days when the government was on the same side as the people. How can you fight for a government that’s already willingly surrendered on your behalf?

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