No, it doesn’t honey, it doesn’t

When the Calais camp closes, what will happen to its vulnerable women?
Natasha Walter
Women forced to leave their homes in this global crisis are vulnerable to rape and violence. The UK has a responsibility to protect those at its borders

The UK has a duty to protect those within its borders. France has a duty to protect those within its borders.

25 thoughts on “No, it doesn’t honey, it doesn’t”

  1. “Theresa May seems to be developing a two-tier system of asylum, in which those who are resettled straight from their home countries are seen as more deserving of refugee status than those who have made these dangerous journeys. “

    People who obey the law better regarded than those who break it? Shocker…

  2. “Our prime minister and our home secretary, uniquely in our country’s history, are both women. If they could find it in their hearts to listen to what women on the other side of fortune are passing through right now…”

    Yes, that’s the way to ensure women in positions of power are regarded as equal – make them treat other women with greater favour.

  3. How many women are in the camp? The photo illustrating the article is about the only one I can remember seeing with women in it.

    The main problem women have in the ‘migration crisis’ is being abandoned to war and poverty by their menfolk.

  4. I don’t doubt women migrants in the camp run the risk of rape and abuse. I’m just glad there are brave Western aid workers on site to protect them with their vaginas.

  5. So the UK has a duty to protect everyone who wants to go there? That’s an interesting one…

    And the fact that the camp is a) there, and b) sh1t is cos the French are perfectly happy to do the minimum so that they move on to the UK and are no longer FR’s problem.

  6. “cos the French are perfectly happy to do the minimum so that they move on to the UK and are no longer FR’s problem.”
    Strange then that the French are so assiduous in preventing, to the best of their ability, would be immigrants getting across the channel.
    It’s France where I get the car searched, regularly, at the ferry port. It’s France where I was regularly stopped & questioned, 40km back from the coast
    Dover I just drive off the ferry & head off up the Folkestone road. Never been stopped once.*

    *Although, for some inexplicable reason, being pulled over & required to get out the vehicle & pass through the metal detector became a regular feature of UK>France crossings. The car they ignored completely. Maybe they thought I might highjack the ferry & fly it to Entebe with the threat of my pocket nuclear weapon.

  7. From which men is this rape and violence coming? Can’t see the average Frenchman in Calais being down with that. Couldn’t be their own brothers, could it?

  8. And who are these women at risk of rape from? All those lovely highly trained architects and doctors that we are told refugees/economic migrants all are?

    I return to my theme that SJWs are mentally ill – they see no discrepancy between claiming a) claiming all migrants are lovely people who we should all welcome with open arms and would be an enhancement to our society, and b) migrant women in these camps are at significant risk of being raped (which I suspect is true).

    Because for the Left an argument only has to be valid for the moment at which it is said and for for the specific aim it is uttered. As long as it makes sense within those narrow parameters its good to go. Any logical extension to other matters is invalid and should ignored entirely.

    As I said, nuts, in the medical sense.

  9. Last night I woke up at about 2 o’clock and just for a change thought I’d sample ten minutes of the BBC World Service before resuming my slumbers.

    What did I hear but an oh-so-sympathetic female presenter lightly quizzing a wheelchair-bound Syrian woman who, with her entire family, had escaped the horrors of Aleppo and made it to Lesbos, having been pushed part of the way, though presumably not through the sea.

    “Yes,” thought I, “a typical case, and one the BBC does well to highlight,” as I recalled seeing all those frail, wheelchair-bound women storming security fences in eastern Europe, committing mass rape in Cologne, or felling trees across the road to halt lorries, vans and cars at Calais, which they then try to board, or, if thwarted, attack with a variety of weapons while shouting “Fuck the UK!”

    As you can imagine, I was devastated when the batteries in my bedside radio conked out and I was unable to hear any more, leaving me with no option but to turn over and go back to sleep.

  10. @bloke in spain:

    It’s France where I get the car searched, regularly, at the ferry port.

    Every time that my car has been searched (ie virtually every time at Dunkirk) it’s been by British Customs or Border Control…

  11. @BiS,

    What Pogo says. The UK controls are all on the French side, which is why you can just drive off. It’s the Brits who are pushing for more security (and possibly Eurotunnel and the ferry companies, to avoid a corporate manslaughter charge when people get killed).

    If the French were serious about the camp, they’d send the head-bashers of the CRS in to disperse it.

  12. @pogo & abacab
    I did two crossings in July/August. That’s two each way. Both France>UK crossings involved the UK Reg car, including top-box, being checked by the French. The UK border in France was purely a passport check. In a large people carrier with dark tints it could have been stuffed with illegals. Nothing landing in UK & nothing Francebound. That’s Dunkerque because home’s only 25km down the road.

  13. Why is the UK not offering citizenship, benefits and use free of cost of a palatial mansion in the Boltons SW10, to Kim Kardashian, who was subjected to a violent robbery, theft of expensive jewellery and threat of rape in France when her husband was not with her.

  14. As is so often the case, the best thing about this Guardian article is the comments. She is getting an absolute pasting!

  15. @Thomas Fuller

    Last night I woke up at about 2 o’clock and just for a change thought I’d sample ten minutes of the BBC World Service before resuming my slumbers.

    What did I hear but an oh-so-sympathetic female presenter lightly quizzing a wheelchair-bound Syrian woman who, with her entire family, had escaped the horrors of Aleppo and made it to Lesbos, having been pushed part of the way, though presumably not through the sea.

    Did she issue a grovelling apology for the cheerleading for the ‘Arab Spring’ (ha!) the BBC and particularly the BBC World Service did? It’s partly why Syria is in this fucking mess

  16. Mr Ebb: That is my thought also.

    As a counter offer to that little SOS Sarkozy’s “have-another-vote” brand of insolence, it occurs that the people of Calais and a Pale around it should vote about again joining England (or the UK –tho’ that didn’t exist the last time we had Calais).

    In return we will round-up, roust and deport back to where they came from the entire Sangette mob leaving nothing but silence and a bit of wind-whizzed litter.

    A good deal for both us and Calais as we will treat them far better than the Frogs and their peace and piece of mind will be restored. Any future marauders will know the people of Calais have carte-blanche to keep them out.

  17. Slightly OT- A few years ago when I was working for a band (who will obviously remain nameless), we were at a Wembley rehearsal studio about to embark on tour. Outside was a truck that had brought back some of our equipment from the summer festivals in Euroland. Somebody pointed out that there was liquid seeping out under the back doors, which upon investigation looked and smelled like piss. Opening the back doors, four of us (including the driver) were confronted with five African men in a rather distressed and dilapidated state. Two of our group favoured calling the immigration authorities or the police; however the driver pointed out that he would be liable for penalties up to to £2000 per illegal. So we stepped aside and let them run off towards Neasden.

    The morals of the story; the laws of unintended consequences are always in play, and incentives matter to the individual.

  18. When the camp closes what happens to the vulnerable women?

    Well, I guess the aid workers will move on to another camp?

  19. From the comments:

    The Guardian are patriots who have never given up the English Crown’s claim to the Pale of Calais.

    Class. No wonder news organisations are ditching comments.

  20. BiS

    @pogo & abacab

    I did two crossings in July/August. That’s two each way. Both France>UK crossings involved the UK Reg car, including top-box, being checked by the French. The UK border in France was purely a passport check.

    I don’t know this, but having done at least a hundred or more of these over the last two or three decades, it’s possible that to some extent they share the work load (at Calais)? The majority “perhaps seem” to be carried out by the Brits (I haven’t counted), but whenever the French do it first, the Brits generally seem to do less (except for passports)?

    Ie, I can’t (easily?) recall going through and seeing a serious full-on “double” check (though – “memory” – could easily be wrong)?

    It would make sense, if not wasting their time (and mucking with departure timetables), unless the existing threat levels had shifted upwards?

  21. Mr Ecks said:
    “the people of Calais and a Pale around it should vote about again joining England … In return we will round-up, roust and deport back to where they came from the entire Sangette mob … Any future marauders will know the people of Calais have carte-blanche to keep them out.”

    If that’s the plan, better to give Calais some sort of Crown Dependency status rather than part of the UK, so they don’t have to apply all our wet human rights laws.

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