Rhiannon is an idiot, isn’t she?

When it comes to British living space, how small is too small? How cramped is too cramped? How poky, is, ultimately, far too poky for comfortable human habitation?

The way things are going, we could soon see. Tory housing minister Gavin Barwell has a possible answer to our housing crisis, and it involves relaxing the regulations on how cramped a flat or house can be, so that young people can afford to get on the property ladder. In the absence of any solid ideas as to what the government might do to solve our ticking time bomb of a housing situation, Barwell wants the private sector to “innovate” solutions to the crisis. Such is our obsession with owning property in this country, of course, that assisting first-time buyers in scraping together enough capital to invest in a coffin-sized “existence pod” of their own is far more of a priority than, say, instigating rent control, reining in buy-to-let baby boomers, penalising foreign investors and second-home owners who leave their properties empty, legalising squatting, building more houses (especially on green belt golf courses), and introducing legislation that makes renting out slum-like properties to poor people for extortionate rates a criminal offence.

Sigh

instigating rent control, – which reduces supply of housing – reining in buy-to-let baby boomers, – reduces supply of housing – penalising foreign investors and second-home owners who leave their properties empty, – empty properties are alerady taxed for being empty – legalising squatting, – theft is a solution to a shortage? – building more houses (especially on green belt golf courses), – idiot fucking cow, it’s the Tories who have liberalised building on greenfield sites – and introducing legislation that makes renting out slum-like properties to poor people for extortionate rates a criminal offence. – reduces supply of housing.

29 thoughts on “Rhiannon is an idiot, isn’t she?”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    In fairness, anyone who begins life with a name like Rhiannon starts with a serious handicap. Especially if she is not Welsh.

    However it is just more of the Left’s usual “this is a crisis, these are our eternal policies, therefore our policies must be the only solution to this crisis” bullsh!t they usually run. The only odd one out is building on the Green Belt. Presumably she thinks that benefits the middle classes and was not a triumph of municipal socialism.

  2. The housing crisis could be solved overnight. Many people who work have to share homes. Make all pro single parents share, it would make a million homes empty and prices would crash.
    If that is not enough make them move to empty houses in Scotland etc.
    I personally would lose financially but I wouldn’t mind for the future of the UK.

  3. Mal Reynolds (Serenity)

    “In the absence of any solid ideas as to what the government might do to solve our ticking time bomb of a housing situation, Barwell wants the private sector to “innovate” solutions to the crisis.”

    Seems like a pretty reasonable answer. Get out of the way. Stop the government artificially restricting supply. Stop the government messing around with demand. Job done.

    Then of course there are the ideas of right-thinking people like her that are so much better than that. Massively reduce supply. Massively pump demand. Nice work, moron.

    Seriously, I swear the interview to be a Guardian journalist must involve a Basic Economics 101 class. You’re hired if you completely flunk the test.

  4. Given that it’s much cheaper to buy the materials, employ the staff and hire the equipment needed to build houses than what you get for selling them, how come so few are being built where they’re needed? Is it all the regulations that have to be followed that stops it being viable?

  5. “legalising squatting”

    Only on the Guardian.

    “building more houses (especially on green belt golf courses)”

    The Green Belt is The Most Sacred Thing Ever unless there’s a chance to snub the middle classes in which case dump it.

    This ‘article’ course have been recycled from a 1970s student’s sociology essay.

  6. I’m willing to bet that she is also against the principle of the hated-by-the-left Tory bedroom tax under which additional unused rooms in social housing funded by the public via benefits incur a charge for the occupants.

  7. Legalise squatting-

    Only in the Guardian.

    Fair enough but do they own enough property to make a difference?

  8. @ Rob and Pat
    A Financial Times journalist recently confessed that some of her colleagues owned buy-to-let properties. The Guardian wants to do down a rival paper’s employees.

  9. She does look like an alien being – I have never seen the job of ‘opinion writer’ advertised for the Guardian – given the near utter imbecility of every one of their female columnists highlighted in these pages, I have to admire their scouting network – they have to cast the net wide to find someone this stupid, surely?

  10. “Or the person who ended up inhabiting the attic I viewed in north London that you couldn’t stand up straight in but which, I was assured, was very warm because it was next to the boiler.”

    But isn’t that fine if you’re living in London? Isn’t the point that you’re in a happening place and you’re spending your time working, in bars, going to see bands or shagging? If you want room to do a jigsaw and have bridge nights, move to Trowbridge.

  11. Oi! I watched Westworld last night, it was pretty good.

    With that fringe, she wouldn’t have a snowball’s, unless she’s got massive tits.

  12. Legalised squatting – otherwise known as adverse possession – is already legal. Slight changes with regards to registered property in 2003, but still legal. It’s the core part of property ownership law that prevents everything ending up owned by the Crown.

  13. “legalising squatting, – theft is a solution to a shortage?”

    Squatting is not theft. Quite the reverse, total abolition of squatting is the abolition of private property, and hence theft of everything you own by the government – although they will, if you’re lucky, give you a license to use what was formerly yours.

    Fundamentally – and this really is pretty fundamental to common law justice, it goes all the way back to Locke (at least) – it is impossible to own something unless you can also lose it. Abolish the ability to lose it, you abolish the ability to own it.

  14. “Legalised squatting – otherwise known as adverse possession – is already legal. Slight changes with regards to registered property in 2003, but still legal.”

    Only with regards to non Land Registered property, which given all property sales and transfers of title have to be compulsorily registered and have been for the last 15 years, there can’t be many bits left that aren’t registered title. If you have registered title, its pretty much impossible for a squatter to gain title unless you decide not to contest their claim. If you contest a squatters claim you will keep title.

  15. “legalising squatting, – theft is a solution to a shortage?”

    It can be, if the supply is relatively fixed and a significant amount of what is available is being held out of use.

    “reining in buy-to-let baby boomers, – reduces supply of housing”

    Not convinced. It might reduce prices by taking money out of the market, but enough to make it not worthwhile to build new housing? I can’t see it.

  16. They do seem to have problems balancing two ideas, never mind three.
    If we have unlimited immigration the we either have unlimited housebuilding or homelessness (a version of which is complained of here)
    Suggest a block on immigration to solve the housing problem and they’ll call you names.
    Suggest building on greenfields and they’ll get the vapours.

  17. @Pat
    October 6, 2016 at 1:00 pm
    “They do seem to have problems balancing two ideas, never mind three.
    If we have unlimited immigration the we either have unlimited housebuilding or homelessness (a version of which is complained of here)
    Suggest a block on immigration to solve the housing problem and they’ll call you names.
    Suggest building on greenfields and they’ll get the vapours.”
    Very true.

  18. “Suggest a block on immigration to solve the housing problem and they’ll call you names.”

    Yes, because it’s unquestionably the case that immigration has had no significant effect on the housing crisis in the SE, which is entirely caused by migration from within the UK – and in any case stopping further immigration obviously won’t solve the current shortage.

    So yes, you get called names like ‘prejudiced’ because it’s obvious the only reason to believe such inanity is because it fits your prejudices. If you stick to the actual facts, you won’t be called out for being prejudiced by the sane people discussing things sanely. (That said, you’ll still be called a racist by some nutcase whatever you say, even if it’s ‘I abhor racism in all forms’, because they’re nuts.)

  19. @ Dave
    Wrong, wrong, wrong.
    The number of persons born abroad living in the UK increased by 3 million between the 2001 census and the 2011 census. Most of them live in London and the South-East.
    How do you expect anyone (except a Guardian journalist) to believe that has no impact on the supply/demand balance for housing in London and the south-east?

  20. “When it comes to British living space, how small is too small? How cramped is too cramped? How poky, is, ultimately, far too poky for comfortable human habitation?”

    Next week, Rhiannon rails against “urban sprawl”.

  21. Bloke in Costa Rica

    You can forget all the rest of her guff. It’s the crack about golf courses that gives the game away. Here’s an experiment: fire up Google Earth. Zoom in so that, say, Berkshire is the entire width of your screen. It’s basically a big green patchwork. Now spot the golf courses. Any call to build on them rather than on the hundred times greater area of actual greenfield is just being a grasping socialist cunt. As for squatters, the legal remedy should be thus: go to B&Q and buy half a dozen pickaxe handles. Take £500 out of the cash machine. Find a likely-looking pub and make it known that there’s a job of work for some lads who don’t mind getting a bit of (someone else’s) blood on them. A ton in it for each of them. Kick the door in at 3am, beat the crusties between halfway and all the way to death. Call in Rentokil to fumigate the joint. Sorted. Way cheaper and quicker than getting a brief on the case.

  22. “it’s unquestionably the case that immigration has had no significant effect on the housing crisis in the SE”

    Odd, that. I went up to Wembley last weekend to watch the NFL. And as I walked up Wembley High Road all I could see was people from Derby, Newcastle and Hull.

    Not.

  23. @john77
    “The number of persons born abroad living in the UK increased by 3 million between the 2001 census and the 2011 census. Most of them live in London and the South-East.
    How do you expect anyone (except a Guardian journalist) to believe that has no impact on the supply/demand balance for housing in London and the south-east?”

    Amazingly many people do believe that. It is makes me despair.

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