This is sensible

The NHS will be “self-sufficient” within 10 years and not have to rely on foreign doctors, Jeremy Hunt will say on Tuesday.

The Health Secretary will use his speech to the Conservative Party conference to announce plans to train up to 1,500 more doctors a year in England.

Mr Hunt will end the 6,000-a-year cap on medical school students, allowing numbers to grow by as much as a quarter in 2018 and ensuring all young people with the capability to train as a doctor have the chance to do so.

No, not the anti-foreigner bit, but the lifting of the artificial cap.

Except, of course, it should have been done decades ago. When it became obvious that the women flooding into the profession where then going to go part time for decades on end.

You know, if your’re going to plan something and the staff to do it then, umm, you really ought to plan, shouldn’t you?

18 thoughts on “This is sensible”

  1. Why does it need so many doctors would be more pertinent.
    More computer diagnostics as triage, and more nurse practitioners would be a better use of resources. The only thing I use my GP for is to sign my repeat scripts when I email requests through. Everything else is discussed and dealt with by the same nurse at my surgery I see every 6 months for bloods.

  2. @Machiavelli

    Right, so when a nurse gets it wrong because they have only trained in their own subspecialty – then don’t you dare complain (well you might die but tell your children to keep their mouths shut).

    Anyway the UK is already importing lots of American physician’s assistants, who spend 2 years studying and can then do almost everything a doctor can except they need everything to be countersigned by a doctor who isn’t going to ever have time to actually check what they are doing – and they start on 50k a year.

  3. Frankly I would much rather import doctors than rely on those little British air heads who went on strike this year.

  4. John.
    “Right, so when a nurse gets it wrong because they have only trained in their own subspecialty – then don’t you dare complain.”
    Sigh. If they are only qualified to treat certain medical conditions without a doctor, then it is only those they are allowed to treat. Nurse practitioners are not generalists.
    Where is the logic in expensively teaching diagnosticians only for them to spend a lot of their time monitoring chronic conditions.

  5. If they had trained excess capacity, Britain would by now be a world-leading centre for medecine, with patients travelling from all over the world to be treated on Harley Street. Instead the private medical sector has been neutered by the NHS and its stranglehold on training. (The BMA has been fairly disgraceful here too; but the government’s job is to stand up to unions, who are but a conspiracy against the laity.)

  6. So Much For Subtlety

    The sensible solution is to send the women folk back to the kitchens and insist that medical students are male. Or at least insist that the playing field is level and boys are not discriminated against so much in schools.

    Every week the Daily Mail seems to have a story about some sexual assault or other committed by our more vibrant medicos. Why anyone thinks this is a good idea is beyond me.

  7. “Every week the Daily Mail seems to have a story about some sexual assault or other committed by our more vibrant medicos. Why anyone thinks this is a good idea is beyond me.”

    Figures in pr0n a great deal. So there must be a market for it. Or wasn’t that what you meant?

  8. “Where is the logic in expensively teaching diagnosticians only for them to spend a lot of their time monitoring chronic conditions.”

    I would bin the whole idea of “GPs” and have more specialists. Lump on your balls? You go to the cancer screening department. Something stuck up your arse? You go to the proctologist. Because when you go to your GP with a lump on your balls, all he’s going to do is refer you to the cancer screening people.

    Now, if GPs were cheaper than the cancer screening people, this would make sense. They would act as a way of screening people at lower cost. But they aren’t.

  9. “Why does it need so many doctors would be more pertinent.”

    Just look at the price. The market raises the price of things for which there is more demand than supply, to encourage people to move into that area and supply more of it. Doctors are highly paid. Part of that is the length and difficulty of the subject matter and the education, but mostly it’s because of protectionism – the BMA limit supply to raise the price, like any labour union does.

    It’s one bit of professional guild protectionism that the government has never been able to eliminate, because until now doctors and the NHS have been regarded by the voters as sacrosanct. The junior doctor’s strike has eroded their popularity somewhat, enabling this move (possibly – we’ll have to see if Jeremy Rhyming-Slang gets away with it).

    Yes, it’s good. Yes, it should have been done decades ago. But there’s a valid reason why it wasn’t.

  10. “Mr Hunt will end the 6,000-a-year cap on medical school students”: this will come as a relief to those universities that based their financial plans on growth in research student numbers, and then found that the required number of candidates had not come forward.

    Mind you, all government manpower planning fails, and I expect this will be no exception.

  11. I’ve been saying this for years. It’s unsustainable to predicate out healthcare system on sucking in talent from other countries crippling their healthcare systems in the process, we should be training all and every person in this country that wants to.

    I’m particularly annoyed today as I’ve just been turned down for an Engineering Masters, in a country that is screaming out demanding engineers and screaming for immigrants to fill the vacancies while an one and the samer time refusing to take on the natives queueing up at the door want to do engineering.

  12. ‘When it became obvious that the women flooding into the profession where then going to go part time for decades on end.’

    Dunno about that. But I have heard that women doctors tend into specialties like dermatology and pediatrics. The higher the percentage of women as doctors results in shortages in some specialties.

  13. Bloke in Costa Rica

    We’d do well to take doctors off their pedestal altogether. They’re skilled professionals, to be sure, but so what? I could do without hearing any more impertinent yapping from that Gilmore character, for a start. ‘Oo’s ‘e fink ‘e is, God?

  14. “They’re skilled professionals, to be sure”

    I’m beginning to have my doubts, particularly about GPs. I reckon with an internet link a reasonably intelligent person could diagnose about as accurately, possibly better.

  15. “internet link a reasonably intelligent person could diagnose about as accurately, possibly better.”
    Easy to say.
    But all ailments start small -and often imitate other ailments or are overlapped by other complaints.
    Even more important -most people want face to face – for the ability to judge on both sides.
    Especially how will anyone look up mental disorders or epilepsy – in one you may be mad and the other unconcious.
    Etc.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *