You complain and I celebrate this

Forgive me if I choke on my rich tea biscuit, Theresa. I have a citizenship that I am proud of, that links me to a wider community, that guarantees me rights and freedoms, and it’s being revoked against my will.

I’m not talking about the airy concept of “global citizenship” that you poured scorn on – though given the international problems we face, and the impact our actions have around the world, some sense of fellow feeling with the rest of humanity wouldn’t go amiss. No, I’m talking about the concrete, legal citizenship that I have enjoyed since the age of 14. In 2019 it will most likely go up in smoke.

One of the reasons the 23 June referendum was a fraud is that what was posed as a simple question of “in” or “out” in fact hid a multitude of other decisions. Though it wasn’t framed this way, it served as an opportunity for a simple majority of voters (in fact, 37% of the electorate) to decide to strip the entire population of EU citizenship.

When Maastricht went through I called up the Foreign Office to ask how I could repudiate this new EU citizenship that had been foisted upon me. I was told that I couldn’t, not without repudiating my British citizenship.

You can rather easily gain another EU citizenship. I could not retain British and not have it. It’s fairer this new way around, isn’t it?

23 thoughts on “You complain and I celebrate this”

  1. David Shariatmadari is an editor and writer for the Guardian. He is currently US head of opinion, based in New York

    So a rootless cosmopolitan guardianista with a weak attachment to the UK frets that he is about to lose an artificial supra-national citizenship. Who would have guessed, particularly with his traditional British surname?

  2. Though it wasn’t framed this way, it served as an opportunity for a minority of voters (in fact, 34% of the electorate) to decide to force the entire population to have EU citizenship.

  3. I’m not being stripped of my EU citizenship. I am voluntarily, through my voting for Brexit, removing this unasked for, unwanted citizenship that I had no say in when forced to adopt it.

    People didn’t get to vote to receive it, but the electorate got a chance to keep or ditch it, it chose to ditch it, so suck it up, David.

  4. “So a rootless cosmopolitan guardianista with a weak attachment to the UK frets that he is about to lose an artificial supra-national citizenship.”

    “Rootless cosmopolitan guardianista” sums him up. There are twenty-odd countries in Europe he can move to and retain his meaningless ‘citizenship’. Surely all will be crying out for people with his skills. We also win by getting rid of a whiny cunt with a beard.

  5. So Much For Subtlety

    We won’t be able to deport a single European. As the papers are saying today. So I don’t see why they would be allowed to deport a single British person.

    Except of course the French courts are not as treasonous as Britain’s.

  6. From that article it looks like Iran is also an option. He has all these opportunities and he is still whining?

  7. Does make one wonder how tone deaf the Graun can be. Platforming such a total outlier is hardly going to opinion changing to any general audience. It’s just confirmation bias for the whining community.

  8. Rob: From that article it looks like Iran is also an option

    As a homosexual and putative ‘pantheist’, longer term Manhattan might suit him better even if his name does begin with Sharia.

  9. This whole “citizen of the world” thing is nonsense – if you were a citizen of the world, you’d be allowed to live anywhere in it.

    I say why not go further – I can proudly state that I am a citizen of the universe.

  10. The Inimitable Steve

    Theo – So a rootless cosmopolitan guardianista with a weak attachment to the UK frets that he is about to lose an artificial supra-national citizenship. Who would have guessed, particularly with his traditional British surname?

    This. I am shocked, shocked! that a Guardianista called David Sharialawkebabman feels no loyalty to Britain.

    Perhaps he should teach us all a lesson by fucking off to another country.

  11. David lost something he was proud of.
    I think i understand that emotion and its also natural to feel a sense of being cheated when you were not the author of the loss. But it’s only that emotion that enables him to make the jump calling an in out referendum a fraud. Because it’s plainly the least fraudulent things of politics of the last 50 years. All the fudging , all the politicking all the dragging the public with them, all the ever closer union, all the germans saying one thing the French t’other, all the assuming when the chips are down we’ll all behave like sheep. That was fraud on a rather large scale and it’s been pricked now.

  12. So Much For Subtlety

    The Meissen Bison – “As a homosexual and putative ‘pantheist’, longer term Manhattan might suit him better even if his name does begin with Sharia.”

    I don’t know. Moving to Tehran might not do him much good. But I can’t help feeling it would contribute significantly to the gaiety of two nations.

  13. “…its also natural to feel a sense of being cheated when you were not the author of the loss.”

    Yes, cheated. That’s how I feel when I think of the ethnically homogeneous and largely monocultural Britain of the recent past.

  14. True, gaiety would be enhanced by the discomfiture of someone who is a prick on a rather large scale as well as a bit of a fraud.

  15. Theophrastus, yes similar feeling but not quite the equivalent.
    As others say David can get back his EU citizenship, he can even campaign/ agitate (which it looks like he’s doing) for a UK IN vote in the future. And good on him if that’s what he wants
    But the monocultural experience that’s gone forever as a default.

  16. Bloke Not in North Dorset in Turkey

    “Though it wasn’t framed this way, it served as an opportunity for a minority of voters (in fact, 34% of the electorate) to decide to force the entire population to have EU citizenship.”

    Indeed, and the same happened when we had a referendum in 1975 where only 40% of the electorates voted to remain in the
    the EEC, I don’t even remember a referendum to join the EU.

    Bit of a bastard this democracy schtick when you’re on the losing end.

  17. “Bit of a bastard this democracy schtick when you’re on the losing end.”

    It’s remarkable how many public Remain supporters keep on about it, and suggesting elaborate ways of ignoring it or overriding it, when obviously if they’d won, that would clearly have settled it For Ever (with caps).

    I’m sure if Leave had lost that UKIP and some well-known Tory sceptics might have continued to press the matter somehow, with even less success than the SNP in Scotland, but it’s hard to believe it would be on anything like the current scale.

  18. He moans about 37% of the electorate making this choice for him, but what he forgets to mention is that every right that was signed away during the past four decades or so was voted on by about 640 people, or between 0.001% and 0.002% of the electorate (dependent on the population at the time).

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