Nope, not the same. Similar, equal, but different

The researchers discovered that the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) and the hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) act in opposite ways in males and females to influence aggression and dominance.

Because dominance and aggressiveness have been linked to stress resistance, these findings may influence the development of more effective gender-specific treatment strategies for stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

“These results begin to provide a neurochemical basis for understanding how the social brain works quite differently in males and females,” said lead researcher Elliott Albers, Professor at Georgia State University in the US.

Now just to get the SJWs to accept what every adult has always known.

16 thoughts on “Nope, not the same. Similar, equal, but different”

  1. No, not gender-specific treatment, It’s biology, so it’s SEX-specific treatment. Basing medical treatment on how you and society identify yourself and how you interact with society is not going to work. Medicine has to be based on your biology.

  2. Mr & Mrs Jack Spratt would have thought this pretty obvious without involving neurotransmitters and hormones.

  3. Jgh, well let’s stop confusing the language between sex and gender then. The vast majority of people use male and female to refer to sex. We need something else for gender.

  4. In common understanding people use gender interchangeably with sex, probably because gender sounds more polite/middleclass than the word sex.

    For those of us who are not linguists most people would struggle to understand the use of the terms masculine or feminine when applied to inanimate objects, as our romance speaking language friends do. How can a table be feminine or female? Doesn’t masculine just mean pertaining to a man (whether traits or behaviours). Within the romance languages there is not always agreement on an objects gender.

    So what do we now mean when refer to the gender of a person? A person can be masculine without being a man, a man can be feminine, but for meaning to be drawn from words do they not need to have some consistency at least in the short and have some wider application than just to the individual situation you are discussing ( I know the meaning of words can change or even reverse over time)?

    If when discussing gender when pertaining to a person the word male or man now has no obvious meaning to the outsider/onlooker in a debate then we have destroyed the language and dumbed ourselves down.

  5. Gender isn’t a feature unique to Romance languages by any means – German has neuter as well as masculine and feminine.

    I’m not sure that I quite understand the point about there not always being agreement on gender within Romance languages. Is your point that a masculine noun in one language does not translate as a masculine noun in another or that some nouns can fall into a small ‘common’ category like ‘enfant’ hich can be ‘un’ or ‘une’ depending on the sex of the child?

    A by-product of political correctness and a tendecy to be mealy-mouthed does reduce the power of expression but people tend to find new ways to express what they mean even if the impact of their words has been sadly emasculated.

  6. Yes to the noun point. So ignoring the use of gender in objects, which to me had no meaning ( though I’m sure it is all very meaningful/historic and poetic to others), gender now when referred to people seems to commicate zero information.

  7. “No, not gender-specific treatment, It’s biology, so it’s SEX-specific treatment.”

    No and yes. Gender is biology, too. But it’s a different bit of biology to your sex.

    It’s an interesting question, actually, which of the two this serotonin-aggression link actually responds to. It could be either.

  8. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Gender as a grammatical term has a quite specific meaning. In many North American languages there are far more than three genders. ‘Long, thin thing’ and ‘small, round thing’ are different genders.

  9. So seems to have an attribute the can be objectively judged, unlike feminine when referring to la table or an Olympic athelite in a dress who has his on reality TV show.

  10. “So seems to have an attribute the can be objectively judged, unlike feminine”

    “Objective” is difficult. Are words like “introvert” and “extrovert” objectively definable?

    Standard words are commonly adopted as technical jargon for new concepts when the existing language is not sufficient. The worst for doing that are mathematicians. (Obtuse angle? Square root? Imaginary? Irrational? Manifold? Metric space? Pathological curve?) Mathematics isn’t normally considered as an example of “dumbing down”, though.

  11. @ NiV
    I think that you mean “adapted” not “adopted”.
    You suppose that only the innumerate invent new words, so we leave that to them. Actually mathematicians can also invent words.
    Irrational is correctly used by used by mathematicians – some number which is not the ratio of two integers. I bet you cannot tell the difference between bow and bow except by the context unless they are spoken out loud.
    An imaginary number is one that has no physical representation and so has to be viewed in one’s imagination.
    Obtuse meaning thick

  12. “I think that you mean “adapted” not “adopted”.”

    ‘Adapted’ would imply the word was modified in the process.

    “You suppose that only the innumerate invent new words, so we leave that to them.”

    *Everyone* invents new words. It’s how the language works.

    “Irrational is correctly used by used by mathematicians – some number which is not the ratio of two integers.”

    ‘Irrational’ is from the translation into Latin of the Greek ‘alogos’ where ‘logos’ meant either ‘word’ or ‘reason’. Euclid probably meant it in the first sense – that such numbers were ‘unsayable’ or ‘unnameable’, but the translation into ‘unreasonable’ is perhaps better with hindsight.

    The word ‘ratio’ meaning the result of a division (of integers or anything else) was only invented a hundred years later, probably as a back-formation from ‘irrational’.

    “An imaginary number is one that has no physical representation and so has to be viewed in one’s imagination.”

    imaginary numbers represent ninety degree rotations (or in some situations, 180 degrees). They appear reasonably often in physics – particularly quantum mechanics, but also relativity and electromagnetism.

    But yes, when they were first so named, it was because people thought they were not real numbers (in the everyday, not mathematical sense of the word ‘real’).

    “Obtuse meaning thick”

    🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *