So here’s a question

Just what is it that we cannot do as members of the EU but can outside?

Incandescent light bulbs.
Gender discrimination in insurance.
Free trade with non-EU
Abolish CAP
Abolish CFP
Any bloody size vacuum cleaner we want

And so on and on. We’re trying to create a definitive list of what we’ll be newly free to do. Your ideas please!

113 thoughts on “So here’s a question”

  1. But with government and the civil service infested with petty, greeny, lefty, controlling bureaucrats they’ll be trying to stop us doing all this.

  2. State aid.

    Either ban it or do lots of it, but let’s make up our minds either way. Current situation is that is it banned unless you find a clever lawyer to find a loophole.

    It is the equivalent of tax avoidance for the state – same mind set.

  3. Hire a Swiss-registered car in Switzerland and drive it into France, Italy, Germany etc. (seriously – the EU has banned EU residents from hiring a Swiss registered car and driving them into the EU under some obscure customs provision).

  4. Abolish VAT on domestic fuel. I remember a year or so back the Lefty media screaming about energy company ‘profiteering’ on a rate of 4% while saying nothing about the State raking in 5%.

  5. Completely ignore the opinions and fatuous utterances of:

    Martin Schulz
    Guy Verhofstadt
    Jean-Claude Juncker
    Angel Merkel
    Donald Tusk

    (Others may care to expand on this most agreeable list!)

  6. Reenact the battle of Trafalgar with foreign fishermen.
    Buy a kettle that dims the lights when you switch it on.

  7. Use boric acid to deal with silverfish (Borates Directive). I suspect this may have been behind the mysterious withdrawal and reformulation of Euthymol toothpaste a couple of years back.

  8. Tel: “But with government and the civil service infested with petty, greeny, lefty, controlling bureaucrats they’ll be trying to stop us doing all this.”

    But without 27 other teams of shite backing them up–they will fail to do so.

    Getting out of the EU was just round one of the battle.

  9. Please can I have proper creosote back, glyphosate spared, lindane restored and that bloody silly cut-out on lawn mowers removed.

    Also, while still in horticultural mode, an end to the cursed common seed catalogue.

    Actually, pretty much anything related to consumer protection which has only promoted an entitlement to be thick and careless.

  10. Yes. dredge rivers and stop so much flooding.
    [dredging not technically banned, just that gravel must be disposed if as hazardous waste, instead of sold to garden centers as was.

  11. Where to start!
    We could determine our own VAT rates, providing low or 0 rates to things we might want to encourage and high rates to those we might want to discourage.
    We could stop the use of live animals in cIrcuses.
    We could determine our own priority water pollutants instead of doing what Germany wants.
    We could use a more rational approach to landfill.
    We could adopt a more sustainable approach to the combustion of sewage sludge in power stations. i.e not treating power stations as industrial waste incinerators.
    We could use a more sensible definition of ‘waste’ to promote reuse of industrial byproducts.

  12. Get back some of the chemicals that treat timber – if you buy ‘treated’ timber these days it might as well have been soaked in green water for all the good the ‘preservative’ does. Fence posts rot in the ground within 5 years, when they used to last 15-20 years. All because the EU banned the chemicals that actually worked.

  13. I would have said “beef fat in banknotes” but apparently that masterful bit of trolling doesn’t require Brexit first.

  14. I’d like to see a Belgian interpretation of the food hygiene regulations introduced over here though – in particular raw beef and unpasteurised dairy products.

  15. Declare illegal any earnings by a politician from the EU (pensions, cash for public support, etc).

    Or if that is too harsh, force them to say “I am paid by the EU to say this” at the start of every sentence.

  16. Bloke in North Dorset

    Hold our MPs to account for every law and regulation they enact instead of letting them hide behind Brussels.

  17. A few years ago when the EU updated the standard for safety footwear testing (EN ISO 20344:2011) they adopted the new method for testing coefficient of friction between the sole and the floor from a method developed by a British company. The British method tested the heel slip at 5 degrees. This angle was used after much research. The Germans on the committee demanded the angle be changed to 7 degrees for no other reason than they wanted some input. I know people who were in the meetings who told me about their frustrations. I imagine this sort of pathetic bullshit must be everywhere inside the EU.

    The Americans also adopted this test for their ASTM standard without any such petty bollocks.

  18. Reintroduce the old system of abattoir regulation that had worked perfectly fine for years, to be replaced by the EU version that demanded a qualified vet on hand at all times, resulting in the closure of many of the small local abattoirs, which were far less stressful on the animals, in favour of massive industrialised ones, that the animals have to travel hours to get to in lorries.

    Also the system of meat hygiene and monitoring was changed from one involving inspectors to one that was entirely paper based – hence the horse meat scandal, as once it had been ‘certified’ as beef somewhere there was no-one else anywhere further down the processing chain checking what was on the documentation matched what was in the packaging.

  19. SMFS: Re your point on capital punishment.

    I’m against it because I simply cannot trust the state to get much right and you can’t bring people back from the dead, whereas you can release people from prison and compensate them. May I invite you to persuade me otherwise?

  20. Be utterly, openly and vociferously fvcking beastly and insulting to foreigners who are nationals of countries in the EU, especially the Frogs, the Jerries and the Luxembourgers.

  21. The Germans on the committee demanded the angle be changed to 7 degrees for no other reason than they wanted some input.

    I’m surprised the Germans came up with this, but then I’ve never really worked with them. What I have worked with, lots, is the French. If you are a French “manager” – and I use that term very, very loosely – it is imperative that you “contribute” to a design in some way by suggesting a change – no matter how fuckwitted, and even if you haven’t the faintest idea what you are talking about – because that way you can be seen to be “adding value”, i.e. justifying your employment. You must also be prepared to stubbornly defend your suggestion, hijacking the entire design meeting if necessary, until it is implemented.

  22. I’m against it because I simply cannot trust the state to get much right and you can’t bring people back from the dead, whereas you can release people from prison and compensate them. May I invite you to persuade me otherwise?

    People who dawdle in the street or at airports when I’m trying to get somewhere are clear-cut cases deserving the death penalty, and as such there is very little room for a malevolent state to carry out a miscarriage of justice. There is simply no reason to bring such people back from the dead, even if we could.

  23. TN: That was the same impression I got from my colleagues who are on the committee.

    Still I don’t feel too bad for them now they are moaning that their jollies to Brussels might be coming to an end. Yes, even though they actually experience all this bollocks they are still very pro Remain…. much to my amusement.

  24. “All because the EU banned the chemicals that actually worked.”

    That applies in so many areas, not least in household garden pesticides.

    “We could stop the use of live animals in cIrcuses.”

    I had presumed that was already banned. (Doesn’t really worry me anyway, as long as the animals are treated properly.)

  25. People who dawdle in the street or at airports when I’m trying to get somewhere are clear-cut cases deserving the death penalty, and as such there is very little room for a malevolent state to carry out a miscarriage of justice. There is simply no reason to bring such people back from the dead, even if we could.

    lol can’t argue with that!

  26. There are numerous “home brews” for wood preservation, some involving borax are very good and cheap to make, or you can go all anti eco and bring the wrath of all greenies down on you and use old engine oil for fence posts, a sort of creasote replacement.

  27. Use more landfill.

    Along the same lines, outside the FU we will be able to cart our elderly neighbour’s old newspapers to the tip without needing a waste disposal operators licence.

    We’ll also be able to buy the herbal remedies that have worked fine for 1000s of years, but aren’t sold by massive multinationals that can afford the pharmaceutical licence.

  28. “Use more landfill”

    Hopefully this would result in fewer instances of pikeys dumping crap in country lanes, though deporting pikeys would also help.

  29. the wrath of all greenies down on you and use old engine oil for fence posts, a sort of creasote replacement.
    YES! That’s what I do.

    not least in household garden pesticides.
    Like lindane.

    We could stop the use of live animals in cIrcuses
    I’d sooner end the export of live animals for slaughter.

    EU version that demanded a qualified vet on hand at all times
    Jim – and those vets all seemed to be young spanish women.

  30. Make bilateral labour arrangements with poor countries for jobs that British people won’t do (e.g. agriculture), potentially getting cheaper than Euro labour.

    Protect our waters and allow the fishing industry to re establish

  31. Bloke in North Dorset

    Cook fish and chips in lard and then wrap them in newspaper.

    (Not sure if those are EU issues, but it feels like it.)

  32. Lindane is never coming back. It has been rejected by most of the world, not just the EU

    Nothing like it for treating wasp nests.

  33. With a bit of luck, and a following wind, we might stave off the horrors to come, including VAT on food and medicines, and contributions to the EU integrated armed forces.

    I seem to recall there were numerous instances where the EU imposed unsuitable and/or extraneous regulations on our finance and insurance sectors too.

    Also I second the previous comments about our fisheries (no more “black” fish being forcibly dumped back in the sea), and environmental sectors.

  34. The insurance regulation is called Solvency II and it has cost billions so far to implement and will continue to cost firms billions each year. We had a perfectly good system before this; complicated enough to do the job and yet simple enough that senior execs could have a reasonable understanding of the capital models. Nowadays all firms have to employ an army of actuaries, business analysts and risk specialists, and the capital models have become hugely complicated.

  35. Remember when supermarkets used to give you their old cardboard boxes for putting your shopping in? Apparently, the reason they stopped doing so is that those boxes are industrial waste, so they can’t give them away to you (a) without paying you and (b) because you don’t have an industrial waste disposal licence. I notice that some have started giving them away again in the last couple of years. Whether that’s because someone created a sensible exception in the relevant legislation or because there are now so many petty regulations that it makes sense to just say “Fuck it,” I do not know.
     
     
    > Cook fish and chips in lard and then wrap them in newspaper.

    I think the use of newspaper stopped due to the change in printing tech that means the ink now comes off all over the food. I think.

  36. We can repeal the droit de suite, and let our auction houses compete on a more level playing field with New York and Geneva

  37. “Remember when supermarkets used to give you their old cardboard boxes for putting your shopping in? Apparently, the reason they stopped doing so is that those boxes are industrial waste, so they can’t give them away to you (a) without paying you and (b) because you don’t have an industrial waste disposal licence.”

    Well nobody told Aldi and Lidl then, cos they often have a big pile of them for people to grab and use for their shopping rather than buy ANOTHER plastic bag because who wanders around with shopping bags in their pockets all the time?

    Another one (all these are just farming related cos thats all I know 🙂 ) is to be able to buy simple tractors, that are in fact manufactured in the EU, and currently exported to Africa and S America etc, but can’t be sold in the EU due to emissions requirements. One of the constant moans (among many of course!) from farmers is why modern tractors are less reliable, and far more expensive than older ones ever were, and it entirely down to the emissions rules from the EU forcing industrial engine manufacturers to install increasingly complex engine management systems to reduce emissions. Many tractors now have an ‘AdBlue’ system, which, believe it or not, is basically a tank of piss (urea and water) that is injected into the engine to reduce emissions.

  38. > an ‘AdBlue’ system, which, believe it or not, is basically a tank of piss

    Oh, I know. One of the many esoteric facts I have delighted in teaching my daughter is that any car with a badge on the back denoting any variant of the word “blue” runs on pee as well as petrol.

  39. The cardboard thing is probably because the supermarkets get paid for it nowadays. About £100/mt I believe.

    PS , as someone who works in waste management, it’s amusing to see how many of the above comments are regarding waste. However, I don’t foresee the radical changes you all desire. Plus, a lot of our carbon commitments are international not just European, so things like biofuels and renewable energy are here to stay.

  40. I’m looking forward to no longer seeing any more smug notices declaring that something we could all do without was provided with funds from the EU.

    Likewise, politicians will no longer feel obliged to refer to European leaders, who have shown themselves to have not a shred of empathy with the UK, as “partners” or “colleagues” or such such guff.

    Best of all, we will be able to fart in their general direction.

  41. ” Apparently, the reason they stopped doing so is that those boxes are industrial waste, so they can’t give them away to you (a) without paying you and (b) because you don’t have an industrial waste disposal licence.”

    I always assumed supermarkets stopped keeping cardboard boxes for packing because they were a fire risk.

  42. ” a lot of our carbon commitments are international not just European”

    Unfortunately this applies to a lot of things. Getting out of the EU will only reveal just how many of our rules actually come from UN-type institutions.

  43. “Getting out of the EU will only reveal just how many of our rules actually come from UN-type institutions.”

    Let’s pick the ones we like and ditch the shit ones.

  44. Allow your mobile phone/iPod/iPad/whatever device to play music as loud as you want through headphones that will play it your desired volume.

  45. This by the man from Dorset “Hold our MPs to account for every law and regulation they enact instead of letting them hide behind Brussels.”
    Too often excuses have been made that such-and-such cannot be done because it’s EU rules when with a little investigation it turns out that we can. It’s an excuse for inaction.

    We can devolve fishing and farm policies to local authorities. As well as letting local authorities licence places for khat, cannabis, medical heroine, prostitution etc. We might be able to do that anyway, but it’s good not to be bound by Home Affairs and Justice regulations just in case.

    Full strength e-cigarettes.

  46. The Meissen Bison.

    I get the best old engine oil from a mate who drains the stuff out of VW diesels and the like, that have the 20,000 miles between oil changes. I then mix it at about 30% with some genuine old creosote I have had for some time in a 10 gallon drum. It gets used on my fence every 5 years or so. A fence that has been there for at least 70 years to the best of my knowledge, we have lived in the house for 30 years and we still know the people who lived in the house for 20 years before that. And they knew that the fence was there for the 20 years before that. I had to replace all of the 4″ by 3/8″ angle iron posts due to them rotting out at the bottoms. We had to take some panels down when we built an extension and I have used all of the parts for a partition around the bins. Even when cutting the 3″ by 2″ horizontals the creosote had penetrated almost 30% of way into the timber. NONE of it is rotten in any way.
    Appologies for the long read.

    BRING BACK CREOSOTE!!!

  47. Child car seats: the law

    “Children must normally use a child car seat until they’re 12 years old or 135cm tall, whichever comes first.”

    The law is soon to be made made stricter but since nobody can remember what it is, that makes little difference.

    The law is widely evaded. Most unusually short children, already often subject to mockery, feel further humiliated by being forced to use a baby seat until they are 12.

    The government website always refers only to “UK law” but according to Wikipedia:

    “Directive 2003/20/EC of the European Parliament and the Council[31] has mandated the use of child-restraint systems in vehicles effective May 5, 2006.”

  48. Just to clarify my previous post, the EU Directive 2003/20/EC brought in that children under 135cm in height had to use a child car seat right up to the age of 12. It was already compulsory to use a car seat for babies and toddlers. I cannot remember what the old age limit beyond which a child seat was no longer necessary was.

  49. Tomsmith got my initial thought. Poor African farmers would love to have more access to your markets.

    How about shifting (government if need be) funds to UK projects like Skylon? It’s been quite a while since we’ve had a revolutionary invention like the jet engine or computer.

  50. Chop off the dead hand of EASA, remove it from regulating UK light aircraft and gliders (info: it’s a disaster – a paperwork nightmare, costing a packet and achieving nothing in safety terms. Just ask any of its UK pilot victims)

  51. @ Natalie Solent
    I remember fondly in “the good ‘ole days” when we could drive along, sans seat belts, in our (French!) 2CVs and Dyannes, the roof rolled back and kiddies (under 1350mm high) standing up on the back seat. Of course we drove like maniacs, the better to kill them and ourselves.
    I do wish the regulators would FO&D.

  52. So Much For Subtlety

    Dongguan John – “May I invite you to persuade me otherwise?”

    You can’t really compensate someone for their lost life. You can just make yourself feel better. But I am not sure I need to change anyone’s mind. The famous study by, I think from memory without looking it up, Emory University claimed that each and every execution deterred between eight and twenty eight murders with a mean of 18. So what you mean is that to avoid killing one person, we should let 18 others die. I don’t see the point of that myself.

    Yes, mistakes will be made. Mistakes always are. But murders will not be released to kill again. They will not be able to kill other prisoners or guards while locked up. They will not rape any other prisoners. They will not be able to beat people and run drug syndicates from death row.

    The only downside is that occasionally a mistake will be made and an more or less innocent person will die. We should choose the lesser evil.

  53. The General Data Protection Regulation looks like it’s going to be a nightmare for firms to follow by May 2018.

  54. Gareth

    I remember fondly in “the good ‘ole days” when we could drive along, sans seat belts, in our (French!) 2CVs and Dyannes, the roof rolled back and kiddies (under 1350mm high) standing up on the back seat

    Which reminds of an occasion a couple of decades back, post reunification and driving towards the re-opened Brandenburg Gate, when my front seat passenger suddenly had the comedic urge to attempt to open the sun roof, stand, and adopt a particular pose..

    I had to point out rather quickly that, in the modern Republic, such an action could render both provocateur and driver instantly being transported without trial “somewhere east”. Common sense prevailed.

    It’s a red herring of course in terms of the thread title – because my best guess would be that any renegotiation in our relationship with Berlin is unlikely to change too much on that score…

  55. Rootout (ammonium sulphamate)

    unlicensed, and therefore effectively banned, from 2008 as the Irish Rapporteur refused to review the data supplied unless it contained details of animal testing on dogs.
    Although still available as ‘compost acellerator’.

  56. rosscoe,

    I was blaming the EU for lack of progress. Don’t bring facts into it. Besides, we all know Al Gore invented the internet and I don’t think any Brit wants to claim him as one of your own.

  57. Won’t have to give free uni education to EU students, via student loans we can’t get repaid when they leave the UK.

  58. @djc

    Yes, Root Out was just about the only thing effective against Japanese Knotweed* (I do hope that isn’t being waycist). Although it’s now verboten as weedkiller, it’s widely used in (e.g.) the furniture industry as a flame retardant treatment for foam and other ‘stuffing’, so perfectly safe as long as you don’t eat the stuff.

    Fortunately, contacts in industry can easily and legally order 20kg sacks, which will meet my needs for a few years.

    * A mate tells me that turning pigs out onto the affected area for a few months is a guaranteed fix, but that’s not always practicable.

  59. “Buy a kettle that dims the lights when you switch it on”

    If common sense doesn’t return to our energy policy PDQ there won’t be enough electricity to make the lights glow in the first place: http://euanmearns.com/blackout-the-sequel/.

    “All because the EU banned the chemicals that actually worked.”

    I remember using “Casenit” to harden tools in the metalwork class at school. Apparently it contained cyanide, and is now only available in some less effective variant. Predictably, many forum posts are describing how to “make your own”, which is undoubtedly at damn sight more dangerous.

    As for farm tractors – there are plenty of “Little Grey Fergies” about, some still working daily after 60 years. My friend has had his restored (along with a slightly newer MF35), and they will still be going strong after both of us have passed on…

  60. SMFS
    Well said on the death penalty. Yes, the study was done at Emory, and there several other studies with similar results. The death penalty is social hygiene.

  61. I’m against the death penalty (on the grounds that it’s destruction of evidence), but I’m also a democrat uber alles. It was abolished in return for a promise to the public that those who would previously have been executed would never leave prison. Since then, that has turned out to be a complete lie, but the debate has been taken off the table by our lords & masters. I strongly believe that the public ought to be given the option of bringing it back democratically — if no party will put even a consulation on the matter into their manifesto, maybe it’s a subject for another referendum. If the public disagree with me and bring it back, so be it.

  62. And Frost and Harpending (2015) “Western Europe, state formation, and genetic pacification.”

    “Courts imposed the death penalty more and more often and, by the late Middle Ages, were condemning to death between 0.5 and 1.0% of all men of each generation, with perhaps just as many offenders dying at the scene of the crime or in prison while awaiting trial. Meanwhile, the homicide rate plummeted from the 14th century to the 20th. The pool of violent men dried up until most murders occurred under conditions of jealousy, intoxication, or extreme stress. The decline in personal violence is usually attributed to harsher punishment and the longer-term effects of cultural conditioning. It may also be, however, that this new cultural environment selected against propensities for violence.”

  63. @S2, yep lead free solder is actually worse for the health than leaded solder.

    And for everyone else, leaded solder is only dangerous if you handle it a lot and then eat without washing your hands or if you solder with no extractor fan. It’s the flux that causes problems not the lead. Lead free solder is more dangerous because of the fumes from it when you are using it and more powerful extractor fans are needed. Plus lead free solder leads to more equipment failures due to something called Tin Whiskers. So lead free solder is banned in NASA kit and medical stuff.

  64. James James
    Interesting quote. Yet we have imported millions of people from ethnic groups that have not been through this process of genetic selection and cultural conditioning. It cannot end well.

  65. “BRING BACK CREOSOTE!!!”

    Its hasn’t actually gone away – its just not supposed to be sold to domestic purchasers, so its disappeared from garden centres, and DIY stores. Commercial buyers can still get it, but only in larger quantities that would put off most domestic users. You can buy a 20l drum of real creosote (not the pretend stuff) over the internet, I have, admittedly my address is a farm, but no-one asked what I wanted it for, I doubt the sellers are that bothered as long as you pay.

  66. JIM,

    Many thanks. I’ve found a supplier who can supply it to my company. And only £45 delivered for 25 Litres. My fence is going to be looking good this summer, may do it every other year now instead of every 5.

    I’ll have a pint for you when I’m out later.

    Daedalus

  67. @ Chris Miller

    Amonium Sulphamate is readily obtainable from eg Amazon, and can be sold as a compost accelerator but it is not licensed to be used a a herbicide, So you just have to be careful not to spill any on the weeds on your way to the compost heap.

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