Where to start, where to start, eh?

Geoff Tily of the TUC spoke at what looked to be an important event at the LSE last night to launch a new book called The Econocracy, which I could not attend. In his notes for the event on the TUC blog he suggests that:

Academia blocks progress in economic thought

and concludes:

The so-called golden age after the war was not the result of chance: it was the result of a collective exercise of reason and political will. It is a grotesque parody to suggest it was only made possible by war. We should surely proceed on the basis that a second golden age is within our grasp.

I agree with both ideas. The solution is obvious: we have to shatter the stranglehold of falsehood that is sold as if it is economics by almost every university department that bears that name.

Which university department of political economy should we start with d’ye think?

13 thoughts on “Where to start, where to start, eh?”

  1. dearieme is right on. The other things are that the war killed many men of working age, cut a swathe through the life expectancy of the aged and disabled and left huge amounts of maintenance, repairs, rebuilding etc. to do. So wages improved, unemployment reduced etc. But it was only until the late 50’s and into the 60’s that it really improved. Also, property prices were still sane.

  2. ” we have to shatter the stranglehold of falsehood that is sold as if it is economics by almost every university department ”

    Everyone else is wrong, Murphy alone is right.

    The fat turd is delusional.

  3. It was also the “age of infrastructure”. More people were owing cars, so we needed better roads. Electricity, phones likewise. These were, at a bare minimum, things that needed the state to coordinate and regulate.

    And with the cost of transactions, it was cheaper to do things in house. Even if we wanted to give people in the Highlands high speed internet, you wouldn’t have a bunch of ministry men doing it. You’d define a contract for service and subsidise the lowest bidder.

  4. In 1980, my daughter, entering Penn State as a freshman, brought home an economics textbook that was so blatantly in favor of collectivism that I called U. of Utah (where the author was a professor) to try to learn something about this “take” on economic knowledge.

    Within a few minutes, I actually had the author/professor on the line. In condescending manner, he explained that he was not a professor who was a communist, rather, he was a communist who was a professor. It was not his purpose, he assured me, to impart economics from the view of a communist but, rather, to impart communism from the point of view of economics. His job, as he saw it, he explained, was to produce communists, not students knowledgeable in economics. And, no matter my objections, he assured that his was a widely-accepted
    textbook in universities throughout the U.S.

  5. Robinson Crusoe is on the list, I think I was ten when I read that. Surprised it’s not banned now due to his white privilege.

  6. “Robinson Crusoe is on the list, I think I was ten when I read that. Surprised it’s not banned now due to his white privilege.”

    He had his own island!

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