Did the UK produce 20% of the EU’s new jobs last year?

Or net new jobs of course, for there were millions upon millions created.

MD writes in to ask whether this is why they want us to stay so much?

“EU unemployment has dropped by by about 1.5 million people in the last year. UK unemployment has increased by ~20K… but UK employed has increased by ~340K. (Numbers from trading statistics)

EU migration to UK was around 300K people, we found out last week? So the reason that the EU wants freedom to work here is we’ve produced 20% of the jobs for the whole darn EU, over the last year.”

Interesting thought and I don’t know the numbers myself….

41 thoughts on “Did the UK produce 20% of the EU’s new jobs last year?”

  1. When they thought we’d stay in they treated us like shit, but now they’ve got us to go there’s not much introspection.

  2. Biggie–its mutual.

    Perhaps we will be able to pick up all of Europe as cheap real estate after the majority of mugs who live there have finally ruined it. Blood in the streets = bargain prices after all.

  3. @Ecks – I was talking to Tim. Actually they really want you to stay. Isn’t that just lovely of them?

  4. @BiG & @Chris,

    I don’t see how anyone can know what they want, and who is ‘they’ anyway?

    Maybe they should have a referendum 🙂

  5. @Ben S,

    “They” being the faceless eurocrats, the unelected dictators of the fascist soviet EUSSR. The wearers of the boot stamping on your face. Forever. Those who have crushed Europe, forced its governments to bankrupt themselves buying votes, and have now made it the most poverty-stricken, war-scarred in its history. Y’know.

  6. They don’t really want us in the club, but they do want our cash.

    Probably France wants us in because they enjoy screwing us over.

    It would be fun if we started acting like we’re already out regarding some of the EU’s restrictions on us; free trade deals, fines, tariffs – what could they do?

  7. Should this really be a source of great pride? Yes most EU migrants manage to find work here. But by and large they’re low-paid jobs. Importing low-paid workers means our productivity falls, ceteris paribus. Falling productivity means a falling standard of living. And that’s before we take into account any other effects of migration (social cohesion; pressure on housing, transport, schools, GPs; etc.).

  8. > It would be fun if we started acting like we’re already out regarding some of the EU’s restrictions on us; free trade deals, fines, tariffs – what could they do?

    I have wondered why the fuck we aren’t doing that. At least one major British bank has already breached an EU ruling, knowing that the Brexit process will be a lot quicker than any legal action.

  9. BiG

    The wartorn scarring is likely to come soon enough. You saw the Italian referendum, right?

    Additionally, there is much rejoicing that Austria has not elected a ‘Far right’ leader – but they have managed to elect a Green? So Germany’s closest neighbour is now under misanthropic crackpots? Hardly a cause for rejoicing.

    Once whatever comes after ISIS develops the capacity to expand Northwards through the ruins of Algeria and Libya and gets a foothold in Europe it is screwed(at least while the EU still exists) Just might take a little longer

  10. BiG: Tim – they don’t want you to stay.

    I’d not spotted that and they are usually not shy about letting folk know what ‘They’ want.

    Take everyone’s favourite EP Präsident who tweeted yesterday evening.

    Congratulations to @vanderbellen, who won the presidential election with a clear pro-European message and campaign 1/2

    #vanderbellens victory is a heavy defeat of nationalism and anti-European, backward-looking populism #bpw16 2/2

    The “heavy” percentage defeat for Hofer is eerily similar to the “heavy” defeat of our very own remainers but more noteworthy is that Martin Schulz must have been so tuckered out by his tweeting that he had to retire to bed early wasn’t able to tweet his euphoric reaction to nice Mr Renzi’s referendum.

    As “heavy” defeats go, the Italian Job is a bit of a classic and I shouldn’t be surprised if Very Superior Old Pale Juncker hasn’t started a bit early today.

  11. Biggie–They can want but they won’t get. Ruin and oncoming financial-social–maybe military– chaos/disaster is what they’ll get.

    You can pose cod-clever with your mock-ruin japes but it is August 1914 all over again and the sunshine is fading.

  12. ken,

    > The UK is clearly a safety valve for the sclerotic economies of the periphery

    You say that like it’s an unfortunate accident. In fact it’s quite possibly by design.

    Many parts of Mediterranean Europe are quite nice places to live. The weather is warm, the living is cheap (no heating/cooling costs), the food is good. If they also had buoyant economies, they’d find themselves overrun with immigrants from the rest of Europe. Instead they appear to run a deliberate policy of pushing low-productivity workers out, exporting them to the rest of the world.

    The UK does the same thing in nice areas. The good people of Surrey took one look at the crowds in London and quickly established planning restrictions to keep Esher from turning into Tottenham. Young people in nice areas complain about high house prices; they don’t understand that it’s a deliberate policy to keep those areas nice.

  13. The UK is clearly a safety valve for the sclerotic economies of the periphery.

    Canary Wharf is chock-full of Frenchmen who want to work in finance yet don’t want to die waiting for a promotion or decent pay. Can France really afford to take them back?

  14. Ecks:

    ‘You can pose cod-clever with your mock-ruin japes but it is August 1914 all over again and the sunshine is fading.’

    That’s tremendous – Do you suppose in Austria- Hungary and the Otttoman Empire there were the contemporary equivalent of the Remainiacs?

  15. @ken,

    “The UK is clearly a safety valve for the sclerotic economies of the periphery. Its loss will put further pressure on the Eurozone.”

    I have to confess I hadn’t noticed the protests aginst the number of feckless Greeks and Portuguese ransacking the country. I thought it was mostly about the rather non-sclerotic Poles, Slovaks, etc.

  16. @TMB,

    I wouldn’t describe Hofer’s defeat as “heavy” – but I would describe Renzi’s defeat as “heavy”, possibly even “crushing”.

    We all know politicians and media are careful with their choice, and particularly repeated choice, of words. I’m not sure I’d even describe Hofer as “far right”, and describing Lega Nord (founded by ex-communists and libertarians) as “far right” is Grauniad-level mendacity.

    There are certainly some “far right” elements to the philosophy of both, but to equate opposition to mass migration from, er, diverse and vibrant countries (a view I, incidentally, share) with a regime that gassed millions of Jews and others is extremely disingenuous.

  17. You don’t surely expect me to believe that only one side was doing anything “irregular”? It’s an election for crying out loud.

  18. BiG

    Don’t tell me, tell Schulz. Send him a tweet: “Sie spinnen. Ihr Projekt geht zu Ende. Besorgen Sie den Sarg und halten Sie gefälligst die Klappe.”

  19. BiG

    Hmm. Interesting question. If we look at the latest UK Labour Force Survey we find that since 2010

    EU14 (including Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden) workers have increased by 45% or 296,000.

    EU8 Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovak Republic and Slovenia. has increased by 125% and 570,000.

    Romania and Bulgaria have increased by 322% and 213,000

    In absolute levels, EU14 962K, EU8 1,077K, Rom/Bul 279K

    I think I’m comfortable with “safety valve”. As well as destination for those looking to do better for themselves.

    http://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/datasets/employmentbycountryofbirthandnationalityemp06

  20. @BiG

    Going by the UK’s experience, it is usually the leftards that are up to no good. I expect that is because the election process is run by the state, which is full of leftards. Righties don’t have the opportunity.

  21. ” Importing low-paid workers means our productivity falls, ceteris paribus. Falling productivity means a falling standard of living. ”

    No, “our” standard of living (the original individuals) doesn’t have to fall, it might do for the arithmetical average worker (who is now a different person) as we now include new workers with below average productivity. Even these below average workers are still contributing to the economy and themselves as someone is choosing to pay them. That’s the danger at looking at one metric in isolation, whether it be productivity, GDP or anything else.

  22. ”Importing low-paid workers means our productivity falls, ceteris paribus. Falling productivity means a falling standard of living.”

    No, because they’re replacing people who have even lower productivity. Productivity is the measure of output per unit of input. Getting the same work for lower wages is therefore an *increase* in productivity, and means a *higher* standard of living. (i.e. you can find a plumber who turns up on time and gets the job done.)

    From an economic point of view, immigration and free movement of labour is an unqualified good – same as any other element of the free market. Immigration controls operate by the same principle and have the same effect on the economy as a labour union closed shop. (“Only members are allowed to work here!”)

    Conservatives argue against immigration on grounds of dilution of British culture, while socialists argue against it on grounds of the threat to jobs for the British. The latter is as valid as any other socialist argument. But like socialism itself, the argument is intuitively plausible at first glance to a very large proportion of the population (who are by no means stupid), and now is common currency in political thought.

  23. NiV,
    You’re looking at individual productivity, not national. Productivity at the national level is defined either as GDP per capita, or GDP per hour worked.

    Any additional worker whose output is below the mean pulls down productivity. Hence why sensible countries have skills-based immigration systems, to only attract workers with above-average output.

  24. Yes most EU migrants manage to find work here. But by and large they’re low-paid jobs.

    Working underneath locals who have the better paid jobs?

    So everyone wins!

    This complaint is a bit like the one whereby it is said that young people can’t get good jobs, so our economy is stagnant. Except the young never have been able to get good jobs.

    You start at the bottom and work your way up, in general. Why would this not be true of immigrants? Do you honestly think that they should be entering at the top?

  25. Ceterus paribus and average productivity falls = bad, migration in to the country means ceterus paribus doesn’t hold so comparing fall in average productivity is comparing apples and oranges.

  26. NiV,

    > From an economic point of view, immigration and free movement of labour is an unqualified good – same as any other element of the free market.

    No, not in a democracy. The economic system we have that enables free movement of labour to be good is itself a product of voting patterns and election results. Since incoming labour can vote, it is wrong to assume that the economic system will stay the same as labour moves freely. It might, but it might not.

    > Conservatives argue against immigration on grounds of dilution of British culture, while socialists argue against it on grounds of the threat to jobs for the British.

    And sensible democrats can argue against it on the grounds that it may be self-defeating.

  27. @Chester

    “You start at the bottom and work your way up, in general. Why would this not be true of immigrants? Do you honestly think that they should be entering at the top?”

    That makes sense for youngsters, for sure.

    But why for immigrants? If we have highly-skilled ones coming in, filling essential roles where there are gaps, they would be coming in “at the top” or at least well off the bottom. And that, to me, makes sense. You don’t bring in a SAP specialist from Germany or a SQL DBA from Poland and set them to work on the IT Helpdesk.

  28. We’ve had young EU graduates working in our staff canteen who’ve gone on to work in both IT and Finance. They are getting a foot in the door, possibly improving their English and at least earning some money while they are try to get a better job.

  29. Sorry what was your point? Mine was about the impact on productivity, which is neither a position for nor against immigration.

  30. Sorry, I thought you were directly responding to my response to Chester Draws.

    I was pointing out that highly-skilled immigrants don’t need to start at the bottom and work their way up unlike local youngsters, indeed should not do so as they should only be filling a high-skill gap.

    (in other words, we should only accept highly-skilled migrants, in order to fill vacant high-skill roles)

    (we should accept totty too)

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