That vote thing looks like a bad idea then

Sara Stewart, who conducted the survey as part of research for a book, said: ‘A lot of women saw large glasses of wine, that contain as much as a third of a bottle, as the equivalent of one unit.
‘Because they didn’t know what a unit was, many thought a glass of whatever size, was a unit.’

For people who cannot count their booze intake are just the people we want voting on how to spend 45% of everything, right?

And just for fun can we make this another example of the patriarchy? Of course we can, just as with not being able to park because they’ve been told that this is 6 inches. The reason that women can’t count their booze is because men have lied to them about the size of drinks in order to get them drunk and thus into their knickers.

See, it’s all the patriarchy!

32 thoughts on “That vote thing looks like a bad idea then”

  1. Is there a handy guide anywhere to how “one unit” has changed over time – it’s possibly the booze frying my brain but I’m certain one bottle of wine used be five or six units, now it’s ten or eleven

  2. Personally, I don’t worry about how much I drink, I leave that to MrsBud. But she doesn’t waste time with units, she is happy to work in bottles (750ml), pints and nips.

  3. DocBud

    The ‘nip’ – now that’s a trip down memory lane – I might go out and pick up a Barley wine for old time’s sake with Xmas approaching. Fantastic!

  4. Tim your numbers are way out. Women spend 70-80% of all household expenditure (depending on country and who is doing the asking).

    If that seems excessive, try walking into your local department store (say M&S). Notice that the entire ground floor – i.e. the premium space – is for women. Notice that the upper floor is shared by kidswear (which women dominate), returns desk (ditto), the restrooms, maybe a cafe area and, oh, some menswear too.

    https://hbr.org/2009/09/the-female-economy

    https://www.bcg.com/documents/file79398.pdf

    http://www.marketingcharts.com/traditional/women-in-mature-economies-control-household-spending-12931/

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/bridgetbrennan/2015/01/21/top-10-things-everyone-should-know-about-women-consumers/#50dc1b6e2897

  5. “A survey of 2,000 middle-aged women found many believed a pint of beer or large glass of wine was the equivalent of just one unit.

    However, a 250ml glass of wine can contain as many as 3.5 units and a strong pint of beer can contain three units.

    So, of that different then. Half a fucking unit. That word ‘However’ is doing quite a lot of work here.

  6. @ Van_P

    If the “nip” has whisked you off to yesteryear, what about it’s imperial cousin, the “peg”, obtainable in two measures: “chhota” and “burra”.

  7. I drink sufficient to get a gentle buzz as the sun sinks into the ocean but not so much that I require more than the assistance of the handrail to retreat upstairs to my bedroom. I regard this amount as a unit of happiness and no prodnose is going to tell me to moderate my intake, now that I have retired, even if my offspring get to their inheritance slightly sooner through my pleasure.

  8. TMB

    I do recall it – I did think the ‘Nip’ was an Imperial measure (1/3 of a pint) although latterly it was rounded down under metrication legislation imposed by the EU….. Wasn’t the Peg changed to a spirit measurement in the Raj or suchlike?

    A warm glow of nostalgia prior to the coming of the Green/Corbynite coalition in 2017

  9. Aah, yes, general disnumeracy.

    A “unit” of 10ml of pure alcohol is quite a useful measurement, what with it being roughly what a healthy liver can clear in an hour.

    Problem is, that this requires school-level arithmetic to calculate yourself, which is beyond most adults these days…

  10. @Ljh

    That should be an official government recommendation. To be adhered to by those who wish to. No other policy is required. Nobody else needs to be told anything.

  11. How on earth can people not know different quantities are different units of alcohol? Its quantity X alcohol strength, FFS, if ‘quantity’ changes, ‘units’ changes.

  12. Van P

    Yes, I think it’s origin was in British India with no specific volume in mind – just big and small. You don’t hear it much nowadays and then only in the mouths of florid duffers who refer to their spouse as ‘the memsahib’ and who have never been further east than Liverpool Street Station.

  13. ‘Because they didn’t know what a unit was, many thought a glass of whatever size, was a unit.’

    Jessica Valenti and Amanda Marcotte, perhaps, but not women of average intelligence…

  14. Henry C – I wonder whether he has a theory for the origin?

    The OED say the origin is obscure though hints at the possibility that it was a peg in one’s coffin. I wondered whether there might be some alternative Hindi derivation.

  15. Flatcap Army said:
    “I’m certain one bottle of wine used be five or six units, now it’s ten or eleven”

    A bottle of wine is 6 units, but only if the wine is 8% abv.

    What’s happened isn’t a change in the definition, but a change in the average bottle of wine. There isn’t much at 8% these days, so they’ve had to bring in the full definition more often.

  16. Bloke in North Dorset

    Gary

    “Tim your numbers are way out. Women spend 70-80% of all household expenditure (depending on country and who is doing the asking).”

    Tim’s referring to the portion that the State takes and spends. As a classic liberal Tim, and most people here, don’t really care how people spend there own money and what proportion is spent by women.

  17. @BiND I stand corrected. Although I now see its a side point, if there is a patriarchy, it pretty shit at doing its job if it funnels 80% of the money to women.

  18. if there is a patriarchy, it pretty shit at doing its job if it funnels 80% of the money to women.

    Absolutely not. It’s brilliant at it, in fact. Bread and games, Gary, bread and games. We have become masters at keeping women in subjection by providing them with colored baubles that we source at places like Cartier and Bulgari and Harry Winston.

    And as the patriarch of my clan I like it.

  19. My rough calculation is that a bottle of normal red wine is about four pints of 4.2% beer, based on how intoxicated I feel after drinking either.

  20. My experience is that they don’t care. They’ve popped the sprogs out, raised them past the years where they’ll fall down the stairs, so it’s sit down with a Maeve Binchy and some Pinot Grigio.

    They know the units. They just don’t like to tell you they’re a bunch of menopausal lushes.

  21. So Much For Subtlety

    Bloke in North Dorset – “As a classic liberal Tim, and most people here, don’t really care how people spend there own money and what proportion is spent by women.”

    I care. I am not a liberal admittedly, but I think all liberals should care. They should just not support a government programme to force people to do something about it.

    But the media is relentlessly hateful to men because women spend so much money. Money that men earn. The path back to a sane society involves men spending 80 to 90 percent of all the money.

    Women should not be allowed to work outside the home or open bank accounts without the permission of their husbands or fathers. As Vatican 1 said. Well, not so much about the bank accounts. That is a little bit of analogy.

  22. Those 2016 alcohol for women measures in brief:

    One unit of alcohol (10ml) is the equivalent to:

    A single measure of spirits (ABV 37.5%); half a pint of average-strength (4%) lager; two-thirds of a 125ml glass of average-strength (12%) wine; half a 175ml glass of average-strength (12%) wine; a third of a 250ml glass of average-strength (12%) wine.

    So it’s a measure of both volume and strength, not entirely obvious if you don’t have the bottle directly in front of you.

    Equally, when was the last time you saw a 125ml glass? Even in pubs, most are serving larger measures in 250ml glasses because it is the large measures that sell.

  23. A unit of alcohol is either a 1/4 bottle of whisky or a bottle of red wine (at >12%). I normally limit myself to two units per evening. As the mast is now well below the yardarm, I’m gently enjoying the former and looking forward to the latter.

    During his “ancestor worship” phase my father traced his family back 400 years to wine merchants in Boston. I come from a long line of livers.

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