Transatlantic flight attendant arrested for being eight times alcohol limit

Jeez, can you actually survive that level?

An flight attendant was arrested for being eight times the alcohol limit while on board a trans-Atlantic jet.

Officers smelled alcohol on the breath of American Airlines worker Stacy Rosehill, 57, while she was carrying out an in-flight safety demonstration ahead of a flight from Manchester to Chicago.

She was escorted off the Boeing 787 Dreamliner plane in October and taken into custody as around 300 passengers were waited for takeoff. Tests showed she had 71 microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath. The legal limit under aviation rules is 9mg.

Ah, different limit. She was actually legal to drive….that’s if I’ve read the microg bits right.

26 thoughts on “Transatlantic flight attendant arrested for being eight times alcohol limit”

  1. Not quite:

    In the UK the drink driving limit is:

    35 micrograms of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath; or
    80 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood; or
    107 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of urine

    So she was just over double the driving limit

  2. The UK doesn’t have a uniform limit now that Scotland halved it. Don’t worry though the pressure is being applied for England to follow suit.

  3. I don’t understand- why does her intoxication level count for anything?

    The only thing she’s driving is the trolley?

  4. John Square: I guess there is the argument that the flight attendants should be in the best possible shape to either help the passengers in a serious emergency, or defuse a aggressive passenger (rather more likely). You could argue that they should be under the same sort of constraints as say, foremen working around heavy machinery, and it would be fair enough. Some flight attendants certainly take that pretty seriously.

    Of course.. I only realised that after listening to an interview with a ‘Rebekah Roth’ on Red Ice Radio. She basically had reasonable arguments, right up to the point where she was suggesting that the passengers on Flight 93 would have followed instructions from the flight attendants to stay calm and do nothing- because they’re Official- rather than follow the lead of some burly top-tier salesmen/managerial types.

    I could believe many things of the US government, but I’m not that bloody stupid.

  5. @BIND
    If a stewardess is chosen for the job on her ability to cope in an emergency? Why do they all have long legs, pretty faces and wear short skirts and high heels?

  6. So, as Tim N repeatedly points out, you’ve not flown BA recently then?

    Although back in the early days of working in Moscow (91, 92 etc) I was rather grateful for that more mature workforce. BA planes never stayed overnight there and all crew were filled to paranoia with stories about how the entire population were starving and there was simply nothing at all to be consumed in the entire country. So, as the drinks trolley came around let slip that you’d like two gins because, you know, you were going to be on the ground for a couple of weeks, and the motherly types would go all dewy eyed. Leading to placcie bags full of booze an juice ‘n’ stuff as one exited the plane into that rumbustious and most enjoyable early post-Soviet Moscow.

  7. @Tim N

    Are Russian pilots sober these days, at least when flying?

    Cultural change re professionalism? Organizational change – more competent, less corrupt – means they can’t take the mick anymore without risking their career?

  8. I was on an Aeroflot plane shortly after the Russians had shot down that Korean airliner in ’83. I looked up from my book to see everyone looking out of the windows on one side. Curiously I peered out as well and saw a fighter jet flying along side us. “Is that a Korean jet?” I asked. Ah, happy days.

    What I was going to say was, if a freak accident sucks the aircrew out the stewardess has to fly the plane. That’s why they have to be sober.

  9. ‘An flight attendant was arrested for being eight times the alcohol limit while on board a trans-Atlantic jet.’

    Is the penalty for that greater than the penalty for being seven times the alcohol limit while on board a trans-Atlantic jet? What is the legal alcohol limit while on board a trans-Atlantic jet? What about a lesbian-Pacific jet?

    It’s getting to be where ignorance of the law SHOULD be an excuse.

  10. I was hoping someone would have clarified what that legal limit actually meant.

    With the US standard all I know is that if I have a single shot a breathalyzer will show me as intoxicated for far too long after I’ve consumed it. Meanwhile a double shot with a 30 minute wait and a bite to eat before the test can lead to a pass. A comparison to our test would be useless as it is not an accurate judge of impairment.

    Note to any kids reading: Keep some carb heavy food in your car if you end up driving after drinking.

  11. Bloke in North Dorset

    “So, as Tim N repeatedly points out, you’ve not flown BA recently then?”

    I’ve spent more time on BA flights than is healthy and agree with TimN, but they are relatively efficient compared to some airlines I’ve have had to use. (Flying internally in India for example).

    But they are a glamour models compared to United. I had the misfortune to fly from LA to HK and the cabin crew were, to put it delicately, far more mature than BA cabin crew and with the attitude of surly teenagers who’d just been told that they couldn’t go to their best friend’s sleepover. And that was business, God knows what it was like at the back of the plane.

  12. Are Russian pilots sober these days, at least when flying?

    Cultural change re professionalism? Organizational change – more competent, less corrupt – means they can’t take the mick anymore without risking their career?

    Things have improved a lot in Russia on most levels, albeit from an astonishingly low base. Even the traffic police aren’t as corrupt any more. So yes, pilots tend not to be as shitfaced as they were, for the reasons you state plus better standards of living all round. Snowplough drivers working airport runways are still shitfaced though, obviously.

  13. That Korean airliner’s flight number was 007. To be fair, obviously it was spying.

    Shot down over the sea just south of my beloved Sakhalin Island. I went to the airfield they scrambled the jet from.

  14. So Much For Subtlety

    On the plus side, it would greatly increase some lucky bugger’s chance of joining the Mile High Club. Somewhat over-rated I suspect.

    But the important question is if you shag a trolly dolly on an American Airlines plane while over international waters after leaving Moscow, under whose law are you charged with rape?

  15. MBE,

    There has been a glimmer of hope for Nigeria for several years now. Reforms that have led to some opportunities for capitalists. For example, private industry is making moves to develop the coal resources in kobi* state. Whether or not this works depends on if the socialists gain control again. Given recent history I wouldn’t rush to invest in Nigerian coal, despite the benefits the people will eventually see.

    SMFS,

    Whoever’s laws the SJWs believe will give the harshest sentence.

    Tim W,

    Thank you for introducing me to the concept of Kuznets curves. I now have a term to use to describe things that others can recognize. Sadly I am now far too knowledgeable about economics to pass a course at City College. Previously I was just too knowledgeable so I consider it an improvement.

    * Apparently Nigerian state names do not get capitalized in Nigeria. Hopefully SMFS’s airline SJWs don’t come after me for cultural appropriation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *