An alternative solution for Ellie

Let’s restrict the number of privately educated people in Britain’s elite
Ellie Mae O’Hagan

A quota system would redress the woeful under-representation of state-educated people in our establishment, and improve the quality of our government

Why don’t we just make state controlled education less shit?

So here’s a solution: instead of collectively rolling our eyes every time a new report on these statistics comes out, let’s introduce quotas. If 7% of the population goes to private school, then it seems only fair that 7% of Britain’s elite jobs should go to privately educated individuals. This would include chief executives, barristers, journalists, judges, medical professionals and MPs.

BTW, since when has journalism been an elite job? It’s a sodding craft you daft bint. It’s not even well paid.

20 thoughts on “An alternative solution for Ellie”

  1. Let’s restrict the number of privately educated people in Britain’s elite

    Let’s start at the Guardian. All Change!!

  2. ‘Daft bint’ is unreasonably mild, like Tesco curry. She merits the complete vindaloo, with subsequent eversion of the alimentary tract and, I need scarcely add, fumigation of the entire neighbourhood by the emergency services.

  3. The funny thing is that if such a policy were implemented, the effect might not be what those proposing think it would be. The Establishment is entirely on board with the liberal SJW consensus at the moment, public school education notwithstanding. Throw out those public school educated liberal elites and they might end up with Brexit voting non-liberal types in the top jobs, which would be an interesting outcome!

  4. Journalism may not be well paid compared to a top City job or a Premier League footballer, but there are plenty of trustafarians at the Grauniad, who would be otherwise completely unemployable, and must be grateful for their healthy pay-cheques.

  5. ‘This is supposed to be seen as a good thing, because it’s down from nearly half in 1979.’

    So it’s being fixed. STFU.

    Good one, Ecksy! You may have to be ‘Merican to get it.

  6. Bloke in North Dorset

    LY,

    “I read, “Our public school system is crap, let’s ban the alternatives.””

    There are plenty who make that argument. Their line of reasoning is that if the middle class have to send their off spring to State schools they will become more engaged which will raise standards for all.

    Obviously that will only work in middle class areas unless they also want to start bussing.

    It goes without saying that the socialist elite will have special private schools for their brats.

  7. “This would include chief executives, barristers, journalists, judges, medical professionals and MPs.”

    MPs?

    Sorry, Ashford. We know Damian Green got 59% of the vote, but he went to private school and we’re over our quota. So Sally Gathern with 29.8% of the vote will be your MP.

  8. That would exclude Blair’s children, who benefitted from private tutoring from a teacher at Westminster. Hell, it would exclude me, since I had private swimming lessons, dancing lessons, piano lessons, driving lessons, and (only once, m’Lud) a golf lesson.

    Looked at that way I’ll bet that more than 50% of children benefit from private education. How many used to have a lesson at something or other at Butlin’s, eh?

    And let me have a moan too: being “privately educated” once meant something different. It meant you were schooled at home by a governess or tutor.

  9. I’m dead keen to go under the knife knowing that the surgeon is the beneficiary of a quota system.

  10. This is a completely safe virtue signal for Ellie. She gets back at the posh bitch who was catty to her at lunch a week ago, and all her privately educated colleagues at the Guardian (I.e. the rest of the organisation) love nothing more than another turn on the rack of self-disgust, as long as it doesn’t actually mean anything.

  11. ‘Let’s restrict the number of privately educated people in Britain’s elite’

    How does one become a ‘lite? Does the clique pick you? Does the Guardian anoint you? ‘Let us’ would indicate the Guardian picks. Perhaps Ginger can give us a weekly list of who is no longer ‘elite.’

  12. @Rob

    all her privately educated colleagues at the Guardian (I.e. the rest of the organisation) love nothing more than another turn on the rack of self-disgust, as long as it doesn’t actually mean anything.

    I particularly enjoy the idea of a bunch of self-hating over-educated poshos working crappy hours on pay that’s (for London) on the low side of moderate, worn out from their daily grind of press-release rehashing, social-media-story trawling and clickbait SEOing churnalism, all taking a moment of lunchtime escapism around their cafe table to decry the moral turpitude of a broken system that enables them and their privately-educated ilk to dominate the “elite” estate of the press. Like Timmy says, that’s got to be a comforting illusion.

  13. I read the article, well skimmed it, and then scanned a few more of their online articles. I didn’t get asked for money. Has something changed at the G?

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