Err, no Daily Mail, just no

In keeping with centuries-old wedding customs in the Muslim-majority southern state of Johor, he also gave her a dowry of 22.50 ringgit (about £4), and the couple kissed the hands of their parents, aunts and uncles as a mark of respect.

Sigh.

Dowry is a share of her father’s assets which she then brings into the new household. The argument being that as part of the new family she’ll not share in whatever distribution there is in the will when the time comes. A payment by the new husband to the father’s family would be bride price. A payment by the husband to the wife would be what? A wedding present?

7 thoughts on “Err, no Daily Mail, just no”

  1. I went to a Malay wedding, friends of the family, about 10 years ago, in SIngapore.

    The father of the bride dressed me up in his Malay dress, took a look at me and exclaimed “John, you look like a terrorist!”

    Then you had the sight of a white guy in full-on Muslim garb hiding round the corner drinking beers I’d bought from the local 7-11.

    A bizzare day all round really.

  2. “Dongguan John

    I went to a Malay wedding, friends of the family, about 10 years ago, in SIngapore.

    The father of the bride dressed me up in his Malay dress, took a look at me and exclaimed “John, you look like a terrorist!””

    Whoa!

    The father of the bride made you wear his dress?

  3. Bloke in Costa Rica

    There’s never more Dunning-Kruger on display than when a journalist writes about something an ångstrom outside his immediate purview. Everyone with an ounce of reading knows that dowry is bride’s family → groom’s family.

    It’s funny, really. The assorted engineers and finance bods who tend to hang out here could probably make a decent fist of doing journo stuff (at least we can mostly spell and punctuate). Our esteemed host obviously does. But the idea of the average hack (be he Grauniad or Daily Mail or whathaveyou) being able to do anything involving sums or actual subject matter expertise? It is to laugh.

  4. There is some tradition at a Malay wedding where the groom has to ‘bribe’ the bride’s family.

    The wedding ceremony begins as two parties at different places. Later on the groom and his entourage travel to the bride’s ceremony where they are ‘stopped’ at the entrance by the brides family. The groom then has to ‘bribe’ the bride’s family to gain access. I guess that’s what they were talking about.

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