Is she really this stupid?

I am currently preoccupied by Mondelēz and the news that the ethical brand from its stable, Green & Blacks is – for the first time ever – launching a chocolate bar that is neither Fairtrade nor organic.

Green & Black’s, the independent brand that was bought by Cadbury in 2005, was founded by two pioneers of ethical consumerism, and awarded the Fairtrade mark in 1994. So this news has rattled ethical shopping baskets the length and breadth of the country.

The official word from Green & Black’s is that there weren’t enough cocoa beans produced to Fairtrade and organic standard to enable it to produce its new Velvet Edition bar. This necessitated other beans procured to the standards of Mondelēz’s own sustainable programme, Cocoa Life. The driving need for this new bar is apparently that some consumers find the flavour of dark chocolate too rich, and must be provided with an alternative immediately. This raises my first question: must the consumer always have a product to satiate every possible desire?

Yes you idiot dingbat, that’s the fucking point. That’s the purpose of the economy, to produce what satiates consumer desire.

Which is why we’ve got Fairtrade, organic, so that those who prefer Fairtrade, and or organic, can satiate their desire.

13 thoughts on “Is she really this stupid?”

  1. “So this news has rattled ethical shopping baskets the length and breadth of the country.”

    All of them? Will they all fit in a phone box?

  2. “…must the consumer always have a product to satiate every possible desire?”

    She evidently imagines that she’s qualified to decide what desires the rest of us should be permitted to satisfy. And all in the interests of Fairtrade, when the only fair trade is free trade.

  3. Questions in IAOOTE we can answer– this one is is a yes and it’s also in the obvious category.

  4. I am currently preoccupied by Mondelēz and the news that the ethical brand from its stable, Green & Blacks is – for the first time ever – launching a chocolate bar that is neither Fairtrade nor organic.

    Are sane people generally preoccupied about the contents of one product sold by a small confectionery company?

  5. Rob – no.
    We are preoccupied by multiple products sold by a large confectionery company. So long as they taste nice.
    I don’t like Green & Blacks fairtrade chocolate so never buy that.

  6. It’s interesting that losing the certification apparently means losing the quality.

    If you’re not Fairtrade then you must be unfair; if you’re not certified Organic then you must be a disaster for the environment.

    Presumably any foodstuff that doesn’t have a royal warrant on it must be barely fit for human consumption…

  7. “It’s an extremely nuanced approach to global trade and anathema to those that think the market ought to be left to do as it pleases.”

    This is what Lucy doesn’t get and it’s very odd because its so simple. Fair trade is the market doing what it pleases. Fair Tescorade is the market doing what it pleases.

    20 odd years down the line, the pioneer, the original badge: has got some competition now, new market entrants. It;s all free market. No law insists on that mark, or what goes into the program, or anything.

    Once Lucy does realise that will she start calling for fair trade mark to protected in legislation or in any of the numerous trade treaties we’re about to embark on. I hope not. Because we need her journalistic services even more. I have no idea what the difference is between the new Tesco virtue points scheme and the Fair Trade one (perhaps we’re soon to see “the original and the best” as its tag line.) I’m sure Tesco’s marketing budget will have a go at informing me but that’s where you come in Lucy, you can inform us, so long as you protect your own brand and don’t jump into bed with one of them.

  8. must the consumer always have a product to satiate every possible desire?

    Well, you can just plough on offering the customer what you think they deserve.

    But then you might find yourself losing tens of millions a year and reduced to publishing pathetic begging letters…

  9. I am currently preoccupied by Mondelēz and the news that the ethical brand from its stable, Green & Blacks is – for the first time ever – launching a chocolate bar that is neither Fairtrade nor organic.

    We are to the point where it is remarkably easy, upon reading a single paragraph, to identify a piece as being published by either The Guardian or Huffington Post.

  10. One of my cooking suppliers does chocolate. Not fairtrade or any of that crap, simply purchased from small farms.
    Up to the individual then to make chocolate. And unless totally dim they make better chocolate than fairtrade chocolate (like its hard!).
    Craft chocolate, something the big boys cannot do.

  11. must the consumer always have a product to satiate every possible desire?

    Ok, let’s shut down all the Gay clubs then.

    (Hears shrieking and screeching in the distance)

  12. @Rob, August 8, 2017 at 10:12 am

    No

    My Food purchases tick boxes:
    look, taste & smell nice to OK?
    price OK?

    Buy

    Don’t care about free-range, organic, fairtrade, country or anything else.

    .
    @Rob, August 8, 2017 at 6:51 pm

    … and vegan & vegetarian restaurants

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