Not much point then really, is there?

Green taxes which are blamed for adding up to £150 to every power bill will not be cut as the result of a government review of rising energy bills announced today.

Dieter Helm, an Oxford academic and critic of wind and solar power, has been hired to lead the official review of energy bills – but has been told he cannot suggest any “detailed” changes to green taxes.

And as I’ve been saying all along it would have been cheaper to simply slap a carbon tax on and be done with it.

13 thoughts on “Not much point then really, is there?”

  1. No indeed. Minor quibble: they aren’t taxes, they’re cross-subsidies to “clean” energy, e.g. feed-in tariffs for solar; but also the significant costs of upgrading the transmission network to cover remote wind farms and to allow reversible connections. Cancelling the network upgrades is doable; but scrapping the feed-in tariffs would cause most of those schemes to collapse overnight. That could cause financial problems for all those homeowners who bought solar panels on credit, on the assumption that the feed-in tariffs would repay their investment. No party wants to face angry middle-class homeowners.

  2. It would have been cheaper for the government never to have interfered in the energy market in the first place and to let people decide for themselves whether or not they wanted to pay extra to combat a non-existent problem.

  3. So don’t change the one thing we have direct control of and that would be the easiest thing to change, interesting parameters for a review to say the least

  4. Don’t change,/i> the taxes, simply itemise them on the bills.

    Require that every bill splits out all the green policy stuff, labels the amount you’re paying to it, and then slaps all the green propaganda over it to make you feel guilty if you don’t support it.

    Remind people that the *entire point* of green taxes is to make energy more expensive so they can’t afford it and will therefore stop using it. And then remind them that they voted for the people who imposed those taxes, and this is therefore the will of the people – i.e. them. So shut up complaining.

    Voters get the government they deserve, good and hard. But it ought to be an informed choice. People should be told the consequences of their choices first, but then they’re free to choose it.

  5. “That could cause financial problems for all those homeowners who bought solar panels on credit, on the assumption that the feed-in tariffs would repay their investment.”

    What investment? Other people’s money? That’s not an investment, that’s a leveraged gamble. Tough.

  6. Oh. Politics? Of the tiny number of well heeled middle classes who bought into the Great Global Warming Swindle on the swindling side? Not many of them are likely Tory voters. This was Cameronian, Hug-a-Husky, bollocks pitching for the Limp-Dim/Green votes eluded him. F**k ’em.

  7. Unfortunately, tax is a toxic word, maybe a few of your regular readers are the types that contribute to that situation.

    Still, nothing bad can come from having some transparency of the composition of a power bill. Whether it be greenery, fatcaterry, inefficiency or plain old economics that is causing it.

  8. Dear Mr Worstall

    “And as I’ve been saying all along it would have been cheaper to simply slap a carbon tax on and be done with it.”

    Ignore for the moment that carbon dioxide is plant food and if it also causes warming that would be good too, where’s the opportunity for corruption, cronyism, excessive bureaucracy or guarantee to fail in that?

    Government is not in the business of providing solutions to problems.

    DP

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