The Guardian’s found another wibbler about chemicals

Charles Massy grew up here, on the sweeping Monaro plateau that runs off the eastern flank of Mount Kosciuszko, an only child enveloped by the natural world, running barefoot, accompanied by dogs and orphaned lambs. Fifth generation, he has spent his adult life farming this tough, lean, tussock country; he is of this place and it of him. But when his friend and Aboriginal Ngarigo elder Rod Mason came to visit he discovered that a lifetime of intimately knowing the birds, trees and animals of this land wasn’t significant at all.

Super, OK, Abo elder, ancient wisdom. Then the Woo:

“Most of our cereal crops, the soybeans, the corn, are all predicated now on the world’s most widely used chemical which is glyphosate [Roundup],” Massy says. “There is mounting evidence that it is one of the most destructive chemicals ever to get into the system. Its main effect is on the human gut and our entire immune system.

“When you look at the As – autism, ADHD, all the other auto-immune diseases – their take off is a 95% correlation to these chemicals being introduced. The evidence is that it affects the gut and the immune system, though it is not the sole factor, and it is a complex thing. But it is that gut that drives our whole immune system, it is our second brain.”

Sigh. That he’s calling autism an auto-immune disease is just one of those signs, isn’t it?

We have lost touch with the land, we manipulate the Earth to our own ends, we dominate it and are ultimately destroying it. Aboriginal people, he says, saw it differently, as something to be nurtured and nourished, a living entity. He calls their custodianship “one of the greatest ever sustainable partnerships between humankind and the ecosystems they occupied”.

Then white Australians brought what he calls the mechanical mind and the European mind. “It is a totally different continent to anywhere else in the world. It works totally differently to that young landscape of Europe with humidity and rich soils. Until we throw off the European mechanical mind we are going to continue to stuff the joint. It is not something inanimate that you can belt. It is almost like being with a lover, you have got to nurture it and care for it.”

Oooooh, yes, that’ll have the snowflakes screaming for more, won’t it? The Abos nourished the land by regularly setting fire to it of course.

Sigh.

23 thoughts on “The Guardian’s found another wibbler about chemicals”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    Aboriginal people, he says, saw it differently, as something to be nurtured and nourished, a living entity.

    A view made up entirely by White liberals without the slightest supporting evidence at all. Just like every other group of human arriving in a new continent, the first thing they did was eat all the megafauna.

    It is bad enough when Hollywood invents this [email protected] and puts it in the mouths of Native Americans. It must be just humiliating to have second hand patronising nonsense foisted on you by the Big Brother of the dominant culture.

  2. So Much For Subtlety

    Paul Rain – “Fire is powerful technology (also most advanced technology Aboriginals had, above their mildly developed stick-making technology).”

    Some what limited without the associated technologies of pots and pans. Which would have required metal or perhaps the use of clay.

    However it may have had a lasting influence on Australian culture – that may be why they like the barbeques so much. Forty thousand years of raw meat with charcoal on the outside does not seem to have had the effect I would have expected.

  3. SMFS: A true example of cultural exchange. The First Peoples gave the People of the Underhand charred raw meat. The People of the Underhand gave them heavy drinking

    Seriously though, probably the most unfortunate example of the effects of a hunter-gatherer people being subsumed into a modern nation. At least the Polynesians and their Amerindian counterparts had stuff like Kava to bring a little bit of resistance to addictive overindulgence.

  4. So 40000 years of pig ignorance and utter poverty=good.

    Western flush toilets and a doubled–if boozed-fuelled–lifespan =bad.

    Piss off back to the Dreamtime Grandad and take your Magic Boomerang with you.

  5. “Fifth generation, he has spent his adult life farming this tough, lean, tussock country; he is of this place and it of him.”

    Is there somewhere they go to learn to write this pseudo poetic, portentous, cod literature shit?

  6. “Aboriginal people, he says, saw it differently, as something to be nurtured and nourished, a living entity. He calls their custodianship “one of the greatest ever sustainable partnerships between humankind and the ecosystems they occupied”.”

    If you all die at thirty because you haven’t worked out how to defeat disease, famine and wild animals you probably will not make much impact on the planet. I live amongst aboriginal Gloucestershire folk and they are quaint, so I do get it.

  7. an only child enveloped by the natural world, running barefoot, accompanied by dogs and orphaned lambs

    Genuine LOL. This is Peak Guardian. It has absolutely everything.

  8. The bit about orphaned lambs is very LOL-worthy.

    Those brave little creatures, bravely struggling against the vagaries of an unfamiliar and dangerous world. Freed from the oppressive shackles but also the comforting security of mother ewe, they bravely gambol on the unspoilt land. It’s ersatz-Mowgli brought up to date.

    Actually, without human intervention, orphaned lambs never get to do much running with or without dogs (and I suspect their marked preference would be for ‘without’).

  9. And there was me thinking “take this land and make it fruitful” was middle-eastern. You’ll be telling me Jesus was white next.

  10. I’ll be extremely angry if they ban glyphosate. A lot of really effective weedkilling chemicals have already been banned. We’ve been left with glyphosate, which is a bit pissweak, but okay, and it’s safe. If that gets banned too then it’s goodbye weed control.

  11. Tel: then it’s goodbye weed control

    On the face of it yes but I’m sure that human ingenuity will find a way. And no, I don’t mean some genius will knock up a super formula of a wonder herbicide. I mean that people will improvise something that works for them from what they can lay their hands on – rather like those resourceful folk who cut EU emasculated “creosote”-substitute with sump oil so protect their fences.

  12. @Gamecock, September 23, 2017 at 11:36 am

    The war on glyphosate is insane. It is highly effective, and non-persistent. A dream weed killer.

    +1 and EU knows that, but they file every study/trial which proves it is safe in the small round filing cabinet – same as with neonicotinoids.

  13. @The Meissen Bison, September 23, 2017 at 4:50 pm

    Tel: then it’s goodbye weed control

    On the face of it yes but I’m sure that human ingenuity will find a way. And no, I don’t mean some genius will knock up a super formula of a wonder herbicide. I mean that people will improvise something that works for them from what they can lay their hands on – rather like those resourceful folk who cut EU emasculated “creosote”-substitute with sump oil so protect their fences.

    Creosote can still be purchased for trade use, however smallest quantity usually 25L

    Petrol is a good plant-killer; salt is often OKish

  14. I don’t mean goodbye weed control for ever, because I agree that human ingenuity will find a way. But it will be bye bye weed control for a few years, particularly for me who just wants to buy something from a shop and not have to screw around making up some backyard concoction.

  15. @Pcar
    Salt can be effective, but is rather wide-spectrum and persistent. Hence ‘sowing fields with salt’..

  16. @Tel

    Ammonium Sulphamate is available, for example:

    https://mistralni.co.uk/products/ammonium-sulphamate

    It is not licensed as a weedkiller in the EU, but as a compost promoter. It works really well as a weedkiller, though. The EU demanded more studies on animals, and the maker refused saying it was unnecessarily cruel, as enough studies had already been done.

    Just be really careful you don’t accidentally spill any on weeds when you are carrying it to the compost heap. That would upset the EU very much.

    Wiki has some background: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_sulfamate

  17. @JackH

    It’s licensed as a flame retardant in furniture foam, too. I have a large sack for that very purpose, but occasionally some may leak out into the garden.

  18. @Tel, September 23, 2017 at 8:58 pm

    …me who just wants to buy something from a shop and not have to screw around making up some backyard concoction.

    Drive into petrol, station, buy petrol, drive home, spinkle petrol on weeds, sit down & read a book.

    No screwing around [email protected], September 23, 2017 at 8:58 pm

    …me who just wants to buy something from a shop and not have to screw around making up some backyard concoction.

    Drive into petrol, station, buy petrol, drive home, spinkle petrol on weeds, sit down & read a book.

    No screwing around required.

    .
    @Jack Hughes

    Ammonium Sulphamate…

    Thanks

  19. Pcar, you’re forgetting the most important thing… keeping the wife happy. Pouring petrol on her lawn is not going to go down well.

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