Deeply unsure that Willy understand the Enlightenment

The meaning he seems to believe in is that the enlightened believe as he does, that the Enlightenment means that he and his should rule:

The intensity of the attacks betrays the fragility of the Brexit position. A 52% – 48% result is not overwhelming. Few of the country’s key interest groups – business lobby organisations, trade unions, universities, the City, the security, defence and foreign policy communities, the creative industries and even the property world – supported Leave. But, more importantly, there is and was little support in Britain’s culture.

That’s corporatism there. A reversion to the pre-Enlightenment world of guilds in fact. Precisely and exactly what Adam Smith was raging against.

Then there’s this:

A significant element in western electorates, particularly among the less well-educated and unskilled members of the white working class, is so fearful about the impact of mass immigration on their sense of identity that Enlightenment values can go hang. There are fertile ground for the populist right everywhere – from eastern Europe to the American midwest, including the poorer regions of England.

But a goodly part of that rage and reaction is that what is being thrust upon them is the very opposite of that Enlightenment. It’s not difficult to see at least some (to be mild about it) insistence upon group rather than individual rights in the bleatings of the left these days, is it? Group rights, corporatism and the guilds being exactly what we’re supposed to have left behind.

31 thoughts on “Deeply unsure that Willy understand the Enlightenment”

  1. So Much For Subtlety

    It’s not difficult to see at least some (to be mild about it) insistence upon group rather than individual rights in the bleatings of the left these days, is it?

    The racially motivated gang rapes of White girls does not help either. Britain is full of people who hate us for our genetics. It is inevitable we will hate right back. We tried giving up that racism thing. No one else was interested.

    Few of the country’s key interest groups – business lobby organisations, trade unions, universities, the City, the security, defence and foreign policy communities, the creative industries and even the property world – supported Leave.

    And yet it is precisely those groups who have f**ked up beyond belief and cannot be trusted to do even their basic core functions properly. Why should we respect, much less defer, to this pack of overly-credentialed buffoons?

  2. He needs a T&S double quick.

    Time he and the rest of his Bubbler MC/CM mates started to feel some pain as a result of their treason.

  3. “A 52% – 48% result is not overwhelming.”

    I don’t remember that attitude when Obama won by 51% to 47% against Romney.

  4. I find the inability of our “elite” to grasp that they are indistinguishable from tumbrel fodder endlessly amusing. It’s like that “Are we the baddies?” Sketch. “Are we the powdered wig poncing paracites?” Yes, yes you are.

  5. Brexit: Leave won, Remain lost.

    The percentages are relevant only to anti democracy creeps. Would you feel better little girl if it had been 60% – 40%?

    The rules of a democratic vote have been known since 500 BC, yet allegedly educated people still don’t understand.

  6. “particularly among the less well-educated and unskilled members of the white working class, is so fearful about the impact of mass immigration”

    I lived in a static caravan after I was born and council estates for the majority of my life until leaving for University (where I got a BSc degree). I now have a well-paid job (about 3x median wage in the UK and I don’t work in London).

    I voted to Leave as the EU is a total clusterfuck. I’m obviously this un-educated demographic that the PPE graduate journo is referring to – twat.

  7. Business lobby groups, the City, property owners, foreign and military establishments – this week they are the good guys, because they allegedly support something Hutton believes in. Next week they’ll be back to being Leftist hate groups when their usefulness has ended.

    Still, it is good to see the Left’s seething hatred of the white British laid open. The longer it is exposed, the more likely said Britons will wake up and realise the British Left betrayed them at least two decades ago.

  8. There was no referendum. We thought there was, but Supreme Court said no.

    A non-legally binding referendum is a contradiction in terms. The decision to leave was not ‘referred’, so there wasn’t a referendum. Only a glorified survey.

    The decision to empower the PM to issue the Article 50 was made by Parliament – 498 votes to 114. That’s the only legally binding decision there’s been so far.

    If it was a cricket match it would be a hammering.

  9. The terms of the referendum were set by a government that was firmly on the Remain side of the debate. Brexiteers can hardly be responsible for the terms under which they won the debate.

  10. I thought for a moment that Tim had accidentally cut and pasted from Matthew Parris’s article in the Times, or perhaps Robert Peston’s bizarre letter to his dead father in the Telegraph.

    My confusion was due to the quotes coming from that oft-repeated tract that is The Remainer Article, which is and for ever will be the same, amen:

    To sum up:

    The peasants were duped by dark forces into not Doing What The Were Told, like in a real democracy
    There will be a wailing and gnashing of teeth.
    You’ll be sorry, you racist bastards.

    Don’t get smug; there is a Leave version of this ur-article; it goes like this:

    We won. Fuck you.

  11. “the creative industries”

    Bollocks. I’m working in a software R&D team and almost everyone was pro-Brexit.

    What they really mean is those bits of the creative industries that live off the state and particularly, the bits that live off EU subsidies.

    There weren’t many video game creators who cared either way. But yes, Curzon is very concerned about Brexit because they get product because the EU robs taxpayers to make films that they get.

  12. we all new that the left were bad losers (and bad winners) , however describing himself as enlightened when he is quite happy with the importation of millions of 3rd world breeders who believe the apogee of civilisation was the 7th century takes the biscuit. Sometimes people should withdraw gracefully from public life rather than behave like toddlers who have spat out their dummy. People like hutton give fuel to cretins like soapy joe and the potato.

  13. “A significant element in western electorates, particularly among the less well-educated and unskilled members of the white working class, is so fearful about the impact of mass immigration on their sense of identity that Enlightenment values can go hang. ”

    As opposed to a remote, indifferent elite with no affection for, or loyalty to, this country, who rule over us ignorant serfs without any sense stewardship or of reciprocal obligation. At least the majority of the politicos 50 years ago had a sense of noblesse oblige, this current crew seem to want the Brits dead and gone.

  14. “At least the majority of the politicos 50 years ago had a sense of noblesse oblige,” – lot of these politicians served during ww2 so would have mixed with the peasants on a day to day basis unlike the present lot who are isolated from the hoi polloi from an early age.

  15. The other thing I take issue with is ‘unskilled’. What’s Willy’s skill? What does he make money from that individuals sacrifice other opportunities for? He had some big job in a state funded college. Works for a state funded broadcaster sometimes. Works for the Guardian, much of which is paid for by bleeding a trust fund. He pontificates about business but has never even run a successful whelk stand.

  16. “I’m obviously this un-educated demographic that the PPE graduate journo is referring to – twat.”

    Woolly Willy is not a PPE graduate: he got a 2:1 in social science from Bristol.

  17. “Still, it is good to see the Left’s seething hatred of the white British laid open. The longer it is exposed, the more likely said Britons will wake up and realise the British Left betrayed them at least two decades ago.”

    Since they haven’t woken up after decades, will they ever wake up? Despite being patriotic, un-PC, anti-EU and anti-immigration, most of the working class tribally vote Labour – because of their handouts and often public sector jobs.

  18. A non-legally binding referendum is a contradiction in terms. The decision to leave was not ‘referred’, so there wasn’t a referendum. Only a glorified survey

    Genuine question: is it possible for parliament to authorise a binding referendum? I’ve been having this discussion with prominent Continuity Remainers on The Times: “the referendum was only consultative, if parliament had wanted to, they could have worded it so as to be binding.”

    My argument is that “no parliament can bind its successors” – not only is this a well-known constitutional principle, it’s unavoidable because whatever the law says a future government with a working majority can simply overturn it. See the Fixed-Term Parliament Act for an example.

    So (I believe) where referendums have been explicitly declared to be binding (e.g. the Alternative Vote or the Scottish Independence referendum) this was simply window dressing to placate the LibDems and SNP with no real force behind it.

    What has prevented parliament from saying (as many, possibly a majority of MPs would wish): “We understand the majority voted to Leave, but they’re all thick racist pricks, so we’re just going to ignore you” is not the wording of the Referendum Bill, but fear of the electoral consequences.

    But I am not a constitutional lawyer, so what do I know?

  19. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Anon: hear hear. The soi-disant creative industries are pabulum mills. I do more actual creative stuff in between logging in to my computer on Monday morning and finishing my first mug of coffee than the likes of Hutton do in a month.

  20. @Mr Yan, October 29, 2017 at 12:49 pm

    “particularly among the less well-educated and unskilled members of the white working class, is so fearful about the impact of mass immigration”

    …until leaving for University (where I got a BSc degree)…

    I voted to Leave as the EU is a total clusterfuck. I’m obviously this un-educated demographic that the PPE graduate journo is referring to – twat.

    “I’m obviously this un-educated demographic” as am I, sigh

    Pcar MBA, BSc, DipM

  21. What’s Willy’s skill?

    Fucked up the Industrial Society, didn’t he (now called The Work Foundation)? Ran it into the ground, fucked it good and proper.

    That’s the sort of skills Britain needs!

  22. Will Hutton thinks that he knows about the less well-educated white working class because he is “one of them” having got a second-class degree from a second-class university – I have considered him to be one of the less intelligent rather than less well-educated among them since* he told me that he had failed the Civil Service Examination.
    “Populist right” sounds like an oxymoron – he means populists who do not conform to *his* pet definition of “progressive” (e.g. the Popular Front of Judaea vs the Judaean People’s Front).
    *Actually I already regarded him as less intelligent than he considered himself to be.

  23. @The Meissen Bison, October 30, 2017 at 12:08 am

    Pcar: Pcar MBA, BSc, DipM

    Yes, yes but is your MBA as good as Will Hutton’s?

    Did Willy graduate?

    After studying sociology and economics at the University of Bristol[3] gaining a BSocSc (2.1), he started his career as an equity salesman for a stock broker, before leaving to study for an MBA at INSEAD at Fontainebleau near Paris.

    Pcar: MBA from a Russel Group uni (4th out of 105, 9 didn’t graduate)

    PS: studied for DipM (CIM) & passed concurrently with MBA 🙂

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