The Senior Lecturer tells us!

To which the obvious response is the one O’Toole has to offer:

The cure for poverty is an adequate income.

And yet this is precisely what society does not want to offer. Just listen to the argument on universal back income – that it will permit the idle to do nothing – and all the prejudices O’Toole refers to are apparent.

There is no reason why people cannot have enough to live on in a country of plenty. That they don’t is a decision. And it’s not a decision the poorest made. In which case it’s the responsibility of those with money. And it’s they who have to face up to their responsibility to change that.

And yes, when I talk of peaceful revolution that is one of the things that has to change.

Hmm.

The median equivalised household disposable income in the UK was £26,300 in the financial year ending 2016 (2015/16). After taking account of inflation and changes in household structures over time, the median disposable income has increased by £600 (or 2.2%) since 2014/15 and is £1,000 higher than the pre-economic downturn level observed in 2007/08.

While median income for the majority of households has recovered to pre-economic downturn levels, income for the richest fifth of households has fallen by £1,900 (or 3.4%) in real terms. This has been largely driven by a fall in average income from employment (including self-employment) for this group following the economic downturn.

By contrast, the average income of the poorest fifth has risen by £1,600 (or 13.2%) since 2007/08. This is mainly due to an increase in the average income from employment for this group, reflecting increases in both the wages and employment levels of people living in these households.

We’ve had median household income growth (after tax, benefits and inflation), we’ve had a fall in top end household incomes and a decent enough rise in bottom 20% household incomes.

As it well know, inequality has fallen this past decade therefore the above must in fact be true. Low incomes must have risen relative to higher ones.

He’s spouting cock, isn’t he?

7 thoughts on “The Senior Lecturer tells us!”

  1. The cure for poverty is getting of your arse and going out and earning money. Not sitting around watching Jeremy Kyle or pounding out garbage on a blog from an end terrace in Ely expecting those of us who do work to fund fecklessness and idleness.

  2. Sadly the people who believe the UK is a jobless desert of poverty, with only foodbanks to aid the starving masses, will not believe any data shown to them proving this is not the case.

    This is despite the oft-noted failure of the Guardian et al to find examples of genuine poverty which is not down to poor choices or glitches in the bureaucracy.

    It’s a matter of faith. As I have found when trying to have a rational argument with lefties.

    I am drawn to the conclusion that while all this liberalism/libertarianism etc is all very well in theory and the Ecksian purge of worthless jobs (and associated pensions) sounds nice, what we need is a good old cull. I’d start with one in five and take it from there.

  3. Who exactly decided that we needed to “cure” poverty? I see poverty as a rather excellent teaching aid for stupid life decisions.

  4. Sadly the people who believe the UK is a jobless desert of poverty, with only foodbanks to aid the starving masses, will not believe any data shown to them proving this is not the case.

    A jobless desert which nevertheless requires mass immigration to do the jobs the lazy Brits can’t be bothered to do.

    I think this is the biggest contradiction in Left-wing politics today. God knows they have others but this one is a biggie. Hard to believe they can believe both simultaneously.

  5. There is no reason why people cannot have enough to live on in a country of plenty. That they don’t is a decision. And it’s not a decision the poorest made. In which case it’s the responsibility of those with money. And it’s they who have to face up to their responsibility to change that.

    And when “those with money” (a.k.a. those who work) see that you can get a good standard of living sitting on your arse lots of “those with money” will cease working, thus reducing the number of “those with money” the State can loot.

    Hmm, it’s a problem. But…wait…print more money! Problem solved.

  6. ‘The cure for poverty is an adequate income.

    And yet this is precisely what society does not want to offer.’

    Equating society and government.

    If government were to give out a base salary to all, merchants will raise their prices due to changes in affordability of their products. Hardest hit? The poor he was allegedly trying to help.

    Allegedly. O’Toole is pushing communism, using The Poor™ as tools. He doesn’t care about poverty and inequality, he cares about replacing government. He talks about poverty and inequality because YOU care.

  7. “He’s spouting cock, isn’t he?”

    The sun also rose in the east this morning, Tim.

    Rob

    That’s basically it. Which those on the left, for all their “intelligence”, appear never to understand. And why socialism / communism – outside of small voulntary groupings, such as “a family” (dad works, gives it all to mum to manage, provides for non contributing sprogs) – cannot successfully work in reality.

    Unless the primary KPI is simply “low inequality”, and then it does indeed appear to work just fine, if you both ignore all the benefits that the ruling party inevitably confers on itself and the consequent outward migration of useful skill and talent.

    What is so hard to understand?

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