Umm, yes, well

Plans by Germany’s national rail provider to name a train after the diarist Anne Frank have come under fire, with the Anne Frank foundation saying it “caused new pain” to those who experienced deportations.

19 thoughts on “Umm, yes, well”

  1. That two thirds of them are cowardly cucks in thrall to cultural marxist indoctrination and willing betrayers-unto-death of Western civilisation and their own families and nation.

    That’ll do for a start.

  2. Don’t see the problem with this, really.

    One could call it institutionalising repentance remembrance, which would be a good thing.

  3. Why does Anne Frank deserve a train named after her?

    The Diary of Anne Frank is a great book for getting kids to empathise with what happened and her story is horrible and tragic, but she hid and got caught. There’s plenty of people out there who put themselves in harm’s way by peacefully protesting or executing SS officers who deserve commemoration.

  4. Bloke on M4: “I like my 14 yo Jews whose fathers ghost wrote creepy sexual stuff into an autobiography, to be the 14 yo Jews who didn’t get caught.”

    Had they already signed off on naming the train with a ballpoint pen? Oh the humanity.

  5. Paul Rain,

    WTF?

    it’s not about not getting caught. it’s about people who risk their skin for others, whether they get caught or not.

  6. I came across a discussion on the internet about how genuine the diaries are. The choice seems to be between her writing the diaries and her father editing them, or his largely composing them.

    Nobody seemed to doubt that the gist of the tale was true though, poor lass.

    On this train: OK, the rail company should say, we promise never to name anything in her memory. The “fuck off” could remain implicit.

  7. Die Bahn seem to have a habit of splitting trains into two, so I suggest they name trains after national heroes that were split from their heads by the Nazis – Hans & Sophie Scholl are obvious candidates.

  8. So Much For Subtlety

    I would assume it is simple – the Foundation is on a nice little earner and they do not want the brand diluted.

    It has nothing to do with anyone feeling pain. I mean, to quote the Wickedest Witch of the North, at this point what does it matter? No one much can remember any of those events.

    There are no end of questionable people associated with the Holocaust who never get called out unless they actually make stuff up. Not even then. Elie Wiesel was certainly … creative. And Simon Wiesenthal doesn’t seem to have hunted any Nazis. But it looks bad to beat up on people who undoubtedly were survivors.

  9. Bloke in North Dorset

    The idea of naming things after people is to prompt people in to remembering the,and thinking about what they did. If they haven’t heard of the person perhaps they’ll go and find out.

    That it was a train should add to the narrative and remind us all, not just Germans, that man’s inhumanity to man knows no bounds if left unchecked.

    I know it’s the BBC so there’s likely to be a lot of made up “facts” but the Gunpowder programme is another good reminder.

  10. SMFS,

    “It has nothing to do with anyone feeling pain. I mean, to quote the Wickedest Witch of the North, at this point what does it matter? No one much can remember any of those events.”

    I find a lot of very old memorial stuff odd. There was something down in a West Country village celebrating the 100th anniversary of a soldier in the village getting a VC. And there were loads of people including small children. And I thought, what do you care?

    WW2 means something to me because of my parents being children, and stories from my grandparents, and being raised at a time when people still talked a great deal about it. But I had little connection with WW1. It has little more meaning to me than the Napoleonic war. And there’s kids there. Kids born after 2000. I doubt any of them ever met a veteran. I doubt they met anyone who lived through it.

    I hear these people from survivors associations who talk for the survivors all the time, and most of them were born decades after the war. They probably don’t even know a handful of survivors. It’s just virtue signalling.

  11. My great-grandfather died in the closing months of WW1 and I knew my great-grandmother until she died when I was 15, and she used to talk about him, so at 48 I have a living connection with WW1. It is surprisingly nearer than many people think.

  12. Solid Steve 2: Squirrels of The Patriots

    That it was a train should add to the narrative and remind us all, not just Germans, that man’s inhumanity to man knows no bounds if left unchecked.

    British Rail did that every day.

  13. Bloke on M4,

    I have to say, I don’t feel much for WWI, my grandfather being too young to have fought in it. My great-grandfather did, but then I think he’d also fought in the Boer War and I never met him. I’ve been to the trenches, the battlefields, seen the cemetaries, but it doesn’t mean a lot to me. WWII means more, mainly because I can still see its effects and I’ve met people who lived through it.

  14. I used to visit my great-grandmother after Sunday school. One of her daughters, my grandmother, had married and borne a child before WW1. So the old girl could have told me quite a lot about it, including tales of the men in the family who’d been killed. I don’t know that she ever mentioned it. Nor did anything she might have told my father about it ever get transmitted to me, except for the story of the uncle who had come back from Canada to volunteer. He was killed at Passchendaele.

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