You miserable sodding cow

There is so much we luddites in the NHS could learn from the giants of Silicon Valley, if only we’d stop fearing change. As someone whose hospital is already part-branded by that global health giant, McDonald’s (yes, the accommodation for parents in my children’s hospital is genuinely named Ronald McDonald House), I can only hope we embrace more of this tantalising NHS-private sector synergy.

A charity – yes, a genuine bloody charity – provides rooms so that parents can sleep near or in the hospital while their children are receiving treatment. In fact, they provided 2.5 million such overnight stays in 2015.

A facility and option which our glorious NHS did not and does not provide in fact.

And this is to be sneered at as some part of the privatisation of the NHS?

Go fuck yourself Ms. Clarke, right royally.

22 thoughts on “You miserable sodding cow”

  1. She goes on about surgeons wasting theatre time.

    They do. I work in a Aus. Hospital with a private hospital adjancent the theatre time differences is stunning. We regularly have patients waiting 15-20 minutes for their surgeons; under anaesthetic in theatre waiting. In the private hospital its charged by the minute the same surgeons are on time everytime and everyones under pressue.

    As well they should be.

    PS Ronald McDonalds house is genuis. In NZ public healtg types got them banned from middlemore hospital. Because its more important the hospital isn’t seen to endorse fast food than parents be in the same city as their kids.

  2. I suggested exactly this at the ASI a couple of days back. Charge the NHS surgeons for use of the operating theatres. Sure, only a paper based transaction but it’s amazing how making clear the cost of something alters behaviour.

  3. “up to £1,000 per month renting out your spare room”.

    You would have thought it would cheer Rachel up to know what the market rate is for a spare room… something that might be worthy of a tax perhaps?

  4. “There is so much we luddites in the NHS could learn from the giants of Silicon Valley, if only we’d stop fearing change.”

    You can’t even get your fucking IT right. You can’t book a fucking appointment in a hospital outside your region without phoning a few people. That’s not even “giants of silicon valley”, you utter cunt. That’s what Hilton managed at the start of the millenium.

  5. Iirc this person was one of the individuals throwing accusations at J Hunt during the Junior Doctor episode.

  6. First hand experience of the Australian system, public hospital operating theatres running in shifts, surgeons operating into the wee hours of the morning .

    All Pathology is a free visit to anyone of several privately run pathology chains open in every high st. No waiting list for ‘an appointment’ , no hospital visit and queueing , requesting doctor has the results delivered in 48 hours.

    The average Britisher (myself included) have nfi how bad the nhs is until you’ve experienced health care elsewhere in the west

  7. Joe Blow,

    The weird thing is that huge numbers of people see how great the likes of Specsavers, Boots and their local dentist are, yet the NHS is shit, but defended by people.

  8. The weird thing is that huge numbers of people see how great the likes of Specsavers, Boots and their local dentist are, yet the NHS is shit, but defended by people.

    Huge numbers of people are happy to pay £100s/yr on private health insurance for their cats and dogs, and then demand (and receive) levels of service unheard-of in the nationalised health service. Yet they wouldn’t dream of paying similar amounts on private health insurance for themselves, or demand similar levels of service.

  9. Surely the main point of having a nationalised health service is to persuade a majority of the populace of the benevolence of the state. As a side effect it also persuades a large number of people that doctors and nurses are selfless saints, rather than well paid professionals.
    To have charities, businesses or other non state actors credited with the provision of health care rather defeats the object.

  10. Tim, from Friday’s Times:

    Sir, Further to Duncan Geddes’s article (“NHS could perform 750 more operations a day if it were better organised”, News, Oct 25), I worked as a consultant vascular surgeon in Sheffield hospitals for more than 25 years and was frustrated by the theatre time needlessly wasted due to multiple factors that any effective manager could have sorted out.

    My routine operating lists were supposed to start at 8.30am, but it was rare for a patient to be ready for surgery before 10am. Consequently, the last patient on the list was regularly cancelled because the staff were reluctant to send for a patient after 3.30pm even though the list was supposed to run until 5pm.

    In the hope of improving this sad state of affairs, I offered a bottle of champagne for all the staff in my operating theatre if we could start an operation before 9am. The prize was never claimed.
    Professor Jonathan Beard
    Sheffield

  11. Bloke in North Dorset

    “I suggested exactly this at the ASI a couple of days back. Charge the NHS surgeons for use of the operating theatres. Sure, only a paper based transaction but it’s amazing how making clear the cost of something alters behaviour.”

    I’ve thought for a while that giving patients an invoice with “paid” stamped on it might have a similar affect by making everyone realise what and where the various costs are and there’d me more than a few wtf moments. I suspect that it would be a non starter because it would be seen as a major step towards doing away with free at the point of delivery.

  12. njc,

    The problem is that while Robinson understands the problem (bad management) he falls for the fallacy of hiring better managers, which isn’t the problem. You can hire the smartest people around. You put them in a shit structure with bad incentives, they’ll get ground down. They’ll either give up or quit.

  13. My routine operating lists were supposed to start at 8.30am, but it was rare for a patient to be ready for surgery before 10am.

    Fucking hell. Envy of the world.

  14. @Hallowed Be, October 28, 2017 at 9:35 am

    “up to £1,000 per month renting out your spare room”.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-5022531/Tom-Utley-Left-s-outrage-idea-save-NHS-millions.html“>Trust the Left to howl down an idea that’ll save the NHS millions and spread a little human happiness

    Abridged

    Once in a while, someone comes up with an idea so dazzlingly obvious, simple and sensible that the only wonder is why nobody thought of it before.

    Such is the partial solution to the NHS bed-blocking crisis, devised by a start-up company in Essex and revealed this week in the Health Service Journal.

    The problem can be stated simply enough. Every day and night, a record 5,800 NHS beds are occupied by patients who are well enough to be discharged after undergoing such operations as hip or knee replacements.

    That is to say, they would be well enough if only they had someone at home to cook for them and see to their basic needs until they were mobile enough to look after themselves.

    This is where the start-up company’s brainwave comes in. The people behind CareRooms rightly realised that all over the country there are homeowners with spare rooms and the time and inclination to help others.

    Hosts would be gainers, they would be paid £50 a night, up to a maximum of £1,000 a month, while being expected to offer little more than ‘a warm smile, a comfortable, clean room and some microwave meals’.

    Another £50 would go to CareRooms, in return for which it would vet hosts, arrange placements and carry out any work needed to adapt homes, such as fitting handrails. Meanwhile, qualified carers would monitor patients by telephone and online.

    As for the NHS, its total bill of £100 a night would be only a quarter of the cost of a blocked bed — while, of course, those on the waiting list for operations would receive treatment more quickly.

    At the very least it must surely be worth a try. Indeed, who could possibly object?

    Yesterday, we learnt the infinitely depressing answer to that question. For barely was the ink dry on reports of the scheme than the massed ranks of the public sector, the Labour Party and the quangocracy raised howls of disapproval.

    For Labour, shadow social care minister Barbara Keeley fulminated: ‘It’s astonishing that the Tories’ care crisis is now so bad the NHS and councils are looking to private home owners to provide rooms.

    ‘These services cannot be provided on such a casual basis and there are clear risks to the people who accept this cut-price care.’

    Meanwhile, reports that Southend Hospital was interested in piloting the scheme horrified activists campaigning to save the local A&E department.

    ‘We are shocked that an NHS trust is endorsing such a company,’ said a spokesman. ‘Offering beds in private residential homes opens a huge can of worms for safeguarding, governance and possible financial and emotional abuse.’

    What’s wrong with these people? They sneer that the scheme would mean ‘social care on the cheap’, administered on unregulated premises by amateurs without specialist qualifications.

    But what on earth gives them the impression that expensive care is a good thing in itself, and necessarily better than a cheaper variety? And what qualifications does anyone need, apart from a kind heart, for looking after a convalescent patient pronounced medically fit to be discharged from hospital?

    Perhaps I’m missing something, but presumably even the Labour Party would be content to send such patients home to the care of a wholly unqualified family member, if there happened to be one on the premises.

    The tragedy is that the statists always seem to win. Indeed, less than 24 hours after reports of the CareRooms brainwave appeared, the scheme already seems doomed. Faced with the barrage of manufactured outrage, Southend Hospital yesterday backpedalled frantically, announcing that it had ‘no intention to support the pilot at this time’.

    Mind you, even if some other NHS trust plucks up the courage to try the scheme, you can be sure the mighty quangocracy will find ways of wrecking it.

    Before you know it, the kind-hearted widow with the spare room will find her home swarming with council inspectors insisting she must install fire doors, stair-lifts and transsexual toilet facilities. Then they’ll send her off to complete courses in health and safety, first aid, anti-racism, gender fluidity awareness and Muslim dietary requirements.

    After a few weeks of this, the company’s scheme will become just as expensive and unattractive as publicly funded social care — and the chance of spreading a little human happiness will be lost. But then, who cares? The State certainly doesn’t.

  15. If they are lodging in a local house they might actually get fed and watered by people who don’t have a nursing degree so don’t feel themselves to be above that sort of thing. Where would it end?

  16. Rob: they might actually get fed and watered by people who don’t have a nursing degree

    People who do have a nursing degree will make sure that their charges are hydrated rather than just watered – unless they forget, can’t be bothered or consider themselves above such menial chores.

  17. What I will say is that post-op patients have been cared for in Hotels in the US for years. They book you in and you get visited daily until you go home.

    Hospitals are bloody dangerous, it’s probably a good idea to get people out of them.

  18. Pcar- just saw your response. Interesting. However much i think its a great potential idea i am rather inclined to pessimism. A scheme like that is always going to cause worry for politicians. All it takes is one or two awful events, an injury or a death and then politically they can’t carry on with it. Anything of that nature happening in a hospital just doesn’t carry the political fallout, and if it does the blame goes on lack of funding or at worst individual management. The NHS vested interests and the general public instinctive interpretaion of reform or innovation as attacks on the beloved NHS makes this a very sticky wicket to play on.

  19. @Hallowed Be, October 29, 2017 at 2:58 pm

    It’s not new. Similar already exists with full support of Gov’t, Councils et al:

    http://sharedlivesplus.org.uk/

    Difference is it’s not an efficient private profitable company; it’s a bureaucratic mess meaning more public sector employees

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